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The Lead

Body’s Good Fat Tissue Communicates With Brain Through Sensory Nerves

March 27, 2015 3:50 pm | by Georgia State University | News | Comments

Brown fat tissue, the body’s “good fat,” communicates with the brain through sensory nerves, possibly sharing information that is important for fighting human obesity, such as how much fat we have and how much fat we’ve lost.

Disrupted Biological Clock Linked to Alzheimer's

March 27, 2015 3:21 pm | by Oregon State University | News | Comments

New research has identified some of the processes by which molecules associated with...

Stanford Professor Receives $1M Stem Cell Grant for 'Bubble Boy' Disease

March 27, 2015 3:20 pm | by Stanford Medicine | News | Comments

With this award, Stanford has received a total of around $297 million from CIRM.

HIV Can Lodge Quickly in Brain After Infection

March 27, 2015 3:15 pm | by Bill Hathaway, Yale University | News | Comments

HIV can establish itself in the brain as soon as four months after initial infection.

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The Brain in the Supermarket

March 27, 2015 3:11 pm | by Peter Dizikes, MIT | News | Comments

Researchers suggest that your brain is making a simpler calculation when you shop.

Researchers Help Create 'Gold Standard' Method for Measuring Alzheimer's Disease

March 27, 2015 10:42 am | by Mark Wheeler, UCLA | News | Comments

A team of researchers has validated the first standardized protocol for measuring one of the earliest signs of Alzheimer’s disease.

Genetic Mutation Explains Why, in Rare Cases, Flu Can Kill

March 27, 2015 10:39 am | by Rockefeller University | News | Comments

Nobody likes getting the flu, but for some people, fluids and rest aren’t enough. A small number of children who catch the influenza virus fall so ill they end up in the hospital — perhaps needing ventilators to breathe — even while their family and friends recover easily. New research helps explain why: a rare genetic mutation.

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Study Announces Durable Ebola Vaccine

March 26, 2015 10:40 am | by Andrew Gould, University of Plymouth | News | Comments

A new study shows the durability of a novel CMV based Ebola virus vaccine strategy that may eventually have the potential to reduce ebolavirus infection in wild African ape species. 

Common Bacteria on Verge of Becoming Antibiotic Resistant Superbugs

March 26, 2015 10:20 am | by Michael C. Purdy, Washington University in St. Louis | News | Comments

Antibiotic resistance is poised to spread globally among bacteria frequently implicated in respiratory and urinary infections in hospital settings, according to new research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.

Why Some HPV Infections Go Away and Others Become Cancer

March 25, 2015 11:05 am | by Duke University | News | Comments

Immune system response isn't as crucial as activity of the infected cells themselves.

Farmers Fund Research to Breed Gluten-free Wheat

March 24, 2015 11:35 am | by Associated Press | News | Comments

Kansas farmers are paying for genetic research to figure out exactly why some people struggle to digest wheat.

Behind the Measles Outbreak

March 24, 2015 11:23 am | by Tom Ulrich, Harvard | News | Comments

Study finds vaccination rate far below what's needed to keep virus in check.

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The Untapped Potential of 3-D Printing

March 24, 2015 11:07 am | by Ryan Bushey, Associate Editor | Videos | Comments

3-D printing could make a huge impact on digital dentistry, manufacturing, organ transplants, and multiple other fields.

Non-FDA Approved Hormone Therapies on the Rise

March 24, 2015 11:06 am | by Cynthia Fox, Science Writer | Articles | Comments

Use of potentially risky, non-FDA approved hormone therapies may soon be as common as use of FDA-approved hormone therapies, according to a study by University of Virginia gynecology researcher JoAnn Pinkerton.

Brain Fitness For a Long and Healthy Life

March 23, 2015 10:03 am | by Dan Gordon, UCLA | News | Comments

The strategies for living a long and healthy life are well known and relatively simple, if not always easily executed: Maintain an appropriate weight. Eat the right foods. Exercise. Limit stress. Somewhat less has been known, or said, about ways to keep the mind fit for the duration. But that’s changing.

Having a Purpose in Life May Improve Health of Aging Brain

March 23, 2015 9:55 am | by American Heart Association | News | Comments

Having a strong sense that your life has meaning and direction may make you less likely to develop areas of brain damage caused by blockages in blood flow as you age.

Google Teams With MIT, Harvard for Genetics Research Project

March 23, 2015 9:48 am | by Ryan Bushey, Associate Editor | News | Comments

The project will focus on finding cures for aging-related diseases like cataracts and atherosclerosis.

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Brain Injuries - Not Worth the Risk for One NFL Player

March 20, 2015 3:03 pm | by Bevin Fletcher, Associate Editor | Articles | Comments

It’s not all in your head. Brain injuries from sports are a steady unease for athletes.

Officials Urge Meningitis Shots at University of Oregon

March 20, 2015 9:21 am | by Jeff Barnard, Associated Press | News | Comments

More than half of the undergraduates at the University of Oregon have not been vaccinated against meningitis, despite the fact that one student has died and five others have been sickened since January.

New Tool May Help Predict Who Will Develop Memory Problems

March 19, 2015 11:05 am | by American Academy of Neurology | News | Comments

Researchers have developed a new scoring system to help determine which elderly people may be at a higher risk of developing the memory and thinking problems that can lead to dementia, according to a new study published in the March 18, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Study Links Stress to Chromosomal Damage

March 19, 2015 10:27 am | by Colorado State University | News | Comments

A new wildlife preserve in India recently became a laboratory for Colorado State University researchers who studied not endangered animals but villagers displaced by the preserve. They found that such stress takes a measurable toll on people’s health.

Spread of Infectious Diseases Could be Linked to Changing Climate

March 19, 2015 10:13 am | by Joe Shust, Editor, Continuity Insights | Articles | Comments

Could a changing climate and changing environments have an impact on the spread of infectious diseases?  At least one zoologist thinks so.

Obese Women 40 percent More Likely to Get Cancer

March 18, 2015 12:00 pm | by Cancer Research UK | News | Comments

Obese women have around a 40 percent greater risk of developing a weight-related cancer in their lifetime than women of a healthy weight, according to new figures* released by Cancer Research UK Tuesday.

Recalling Memories May Make Us Forget

March 18, 2015 11:49 am | by University of Cambridge | News | Comments

Intentionally recalling memories may lead us to forget other competing experiences that interfere with retrieval, according to a study published today. In other words, the very act of remembering may be one of the major reasons why we forget.

Apple's ResearchKit Must Outlast Novelty Value to Aid Medical Insight

March 17, 2015 10:03 am | by Niharika Midha, MSc, GlobalData Medical Device Analyst | Articles | Comments

Apple's ResearchKit needs to make an impact beyond the initial launch period.

American Who Contracted Ebola Arrives at Maryland Hospital

March 13, 2015 9:35 am | by Associated Press | News | Comments

An American healthcare worker who contracted Ebola while volunteering in a Sierra Leone treatment unit arrived safely at the National Institutes of Health's hospital in Maryland, officials announced early Friday.

A Good Night’s Sleep Does More Than Prevent Yawning

March 12, 2015 9:59 am | by TSRI | News | Comments

Scientists show that proteins critical in day-night cycles also protect cells from mutations.

Stanford Showcases New App for Studying Heart Health

March 10, 2015 4:07 pm | by Ryan Bushey, Associate Editor | Videos | Comments

Apple teamed up with a handful of universities to create these medical research applications.                            

First Look at Hospitalized Ebola Survivors' Immune Cells Could Guide Vaccine Design

March 10, 2015 10:29 am | by Emory University | News | Comments

In the ongoing Ebola outbreak in West Africa, whose death toll is approaching 10,000, little information has been available about how the human immune response unfolds after infection. Researchers have now obtained a first look at the immune responses in four Ebola virus disease survivors who received care at Emory University Hospital in 2014, by closely examining their T cells and B cells during the acute phase of the disease.

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