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Cranberry Juice Each Day Keeps Disease Risk at Bay

July 6, 2015 9:22 am | by Seth Augenstein, Digital Reporter | News | Comments

Two glasses of cranberry juice a day might keep some disease away, according to a new study.

Bioscience Bulletin: Doubts about DNA, the Impact of Digital Health, Cancer-fighting Magnolias

July 2, 2015 3:12 pm | by Bevin Fletcher, Associate Editor | News | Comments

Welcome to Bioscience Technology’s new series Bioscience Bulletin, where we bring you the five...

Study Offers Clue to Link Between Swine Flu Shot, Narcolepsy

July 2, 2015 11:07 am | by Lauran Neergaard, Associated Press | News | Comments

One vaccine used in Europe during the 2009 swine flu pandemic was linked to rare cases of a...

Small, Magnetic Robots Aim to Inject Drugs into the Bloodstream

July 1, 2015 8:30 am | by Ryan Bushey, Associate Editor | Videos | Comments

Scientists from the University of Houston and Boston Children’s Hospital presented a new...

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USDA Proposes Healthier Fare for Child, Adult Day Cares

June 30, 2015 10:43 am | by Heather Hollingsworth, Associated Press | News | Comments

As teachers lament seeing toddlers too large to fit in playground swings, a federal program that feeds millions of low-income children may be overhauled for the first time in almost 50 years, aiming to make the meals at day cares healthier and reduce obesity.

Low Scores on Memory and Thinking Tests May Signal Alzheimer’s Earlier than Thought

June 29, 2015 9:50 am | by American Academy of Neurology | News | Comments

A new study suggests that errors on memory and thinking tests may signal Alzheimer’s up to 18 years before the disease can be diagnosed.

Major Step for Implantable Drug Delivery Device

June 29, 2015 9:21 am | by MIT | News | Comments

An implantable, microchip-based device may soon replace the injections and pills now needed to treat chronic diseases.

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Biotech Suneris to Launch Wound Care Gel

June 29, 2015 8:24 am | by Ryan Bushey, Associate Editor | Articles | Comments

The company unveiled the gel at a launch event on Friday.

Bioscience Bulletin: Autism Insights, Goodbye to a Big Cat, Perils of Extreme Exercise

June 26, 2015 4:24 pm | by Bevin Fletcher, Associate Editor | News | Comments

Welcome to Bioscience Technology’s new series Bioscience Bulletin, where we bring you the five most popular headlines from the week.

Diagnosing Ebola in Minutes

June 26, 2015 10:54 am | by Harvard University | News | Comments

A  new test can accurately diagnose the Ebola virus disease within minutes at the point of care, providing clinicians with crucial, on-the-spot information for treating patients and containing outbreaks.

BIO 2015: How the 'Internet of Everything' Will Impact Digital Health

June 26, 2015 8:33 am | by Ryan Bushey, Associate Editor | Articles | Comments

The panel analyzed how the proliferation of internet-connected communication devices, like smartphones and wearables, can generate challenges and opportunities for the future of the healthcare industry. 

Global Gene Therapy Deals Sky-Rocketed to Nearly $5B in 2014

June 25, 2015 8:28 am | by Adam Dion, MS, Senior Industry Analyst, GlobalData | Articles | Comments

The total number of deals in the global gene therapy market more than doubled from 16 in 2013 to 36 in 2014.

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Extreme Exercise Could Lead to Blood Poisoning

June 23, 2015 9:57 am | by Joe Shust, Editor, Continuity Insights | Articles | Comments

A new study reveals that extreme exercise could result in blood poisoning, related to the leakage of intestinal bacteria into the blood stream.

New Sleep Genes Found

June 22, 2015 10:32 am | by Thomas Jefferson University | News | Comments

Researchers discover that a protein called Taranis could hold the key to a good night's sleep.

Pancreatic Cancer Treatment Pipeline Dominated by Early-Stage Development

June 22, 2015 9:07 am | by Joshua Libberton, Analyst, GBI Research | Articles | Comments

While the Phase III portion of the pipeline is comparatively small, it is followed by a relatively large Phase II, indicating that there will be a sustained stream of products moving through the later development stages.

Bioscience Bulletin: Benefits of Chocolate; Performance Based on Pupils; the Thin Line Between Madness and Genius

June 19, 2015 4:25 pm | by Bevin Fletcher, Associate Editor | News | Comments

Welcome to Bioscience Technologys new series Bioscience Bulletin, where we bring you the five most popular headlines from the week.

BIO 2015: Three Intriguing Biotech Companies Featured at the Convention

June 18, 2015 8:50 am | by Ryan Bushey, Associate Editor | Articles | Comments

These three businesses had exhibits in an area of the convention center called BIO Metropolis.

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‘Core’ Immune Cells Reduce Symptoms, Spread of Seasonal and Pandemic Influenza

June 17, 2015 11:19 am | by University of Oxford | News | Comments

Research shows that certain T cells, immune cells that fight infection, can help to control influenza infections by targeting a core structural protein common to all strains of influenza .

Longevity Hormone is Lower in Stressed and Depressed Women

June 17, 2015 11:04 am | by University of California San Francisco | News | Comments

Women under chronic stress have significantly lower levels of klotho, a hormone that regulates aging and enhances cognition, researchers have found in a study comparing mothers of children on the autism spectrum to low-stress controls.

DDT’s Health Effects Continue to Ripple, with New Breast Cancer Link

June 17, 2015 10:12 am | by Seth Augenstein, Digital Reporter | News | Comments

DDT was a wonder pesticide, which turned the tide on everything from bed bugs to malaria-carrying mosquitoes during the 20th century. But even after its health and environmental effects were acknowledged and its agricultural use was banned in 1972, its toxic legacy continues, according to a new study.

Chocolate — it’s Good for Your Heart, New Study Says

June 17, 2015 9:55 am | by Bevin Fletcher, Associate Editor | Articles | Comments

Chocolate-lovers rejoice: new research says eating up to 100g of chocolate every day is linked to lower cardiovascular risks such as heart disease and stroke.

Chemists Find Efficient, Scalable Way to Synthesize Potential Brain-Protecting Compound

June 16, 2015 9:04 am | by The Scripps Research Institute | News | Comments

Chemists have invented the first practical, scalable method for synthesizing jiadifenolide, a plant-derived molecule that may have powerful brain-protecting properties.

MERS Not Given Same Vaccine Attention as Ebola, Other Viruses

June 16, 2015 8:51 am | by Seth Augenstein, Digital Reporter | News | Comments

A MERS outbreak has infected about 150 people in South Korea, after a businessman apparently brought the virus back from the Middle East. Authorities are scrambling to control the spread of the illness, known fully as the Middle East Respiratory Syndrome. But a vaccine is not among their tools – since it doesn’t yet exist, and is probably not close to being developed.

Toxic DNA Breaks

June 16, 2015 8:50 am | by Jessica Fujimori, MIT | News | Comments

A bacterium that is the most common cause of pneumonia — a leading cause of death worldwide — can damage DNA in lung cells, a new study has shown.

Medella Plans to Take on Google, Microsoft in Building a Smart Contact Lens

June 16, 2015 8:45 am | by Ryan Bushey, Associate Editor | Articles | Comments

Medella received an investment of $100,000 from the Thiel Foundation this month, a philanthropic funding organization created by well-known venture capitalist Peter Thiel. 

Some Heartburn Drugs May Boost Risk of Heart Attack

June 15, 2015 11:17 am | by Stanford University | News | Comments

A data-mining study has found an association between the use of proton-pump inhibitors, which account for 100 million prescriptions per year in the United States alone, and the likelihood of incurring a heart attack down the road.

WHO: MERS Not Spreading Outside S. Korea Hospitals

June 15, 2015 10:54 am | by Kim Tong-Hyung, Associated Press | News | Comments

The MERS virus in South Korea, which has killed 14 people and infected nearly 140 in the largest outbreak outside the Middle East, hasn't spread outside hospitals among the wider community or become easier to transmit between humans, the World Health Organization said.

Captive Chimps Now an Endangered Species, Affecting Science and Showbiz

June 15, 2015 10:13 am | by Seth Augenstein, Digital Reporter | News | Comments

Wild chimpanzees have been considered an endangered species since 1990, but their captive counterparts never had the same legal protections. That will change with a new rule announced today by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, which animal rights groups say could bring huge changes to chimps used in performing and in scientific experiments.

Bioscience Bulletin: Birth Month and Your Health; Spider-silk Fabric; A Protein with Many Shapes

June 12, 2015 4:32 pm | by Bevin Fletcher, Associate Editor | News | Comments

Welcome to Bioscience Technology’s new series Bioscience Bulletin, where we bring you the five most popular headlines from the week.

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