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The Lead

Many People Never Grow Out of Growing Pains

July 28, 2014 11:48 am | News | Comments

A new research project shows that many adolescents suffer from knee pain for several years. The pain impacts both sporting activities and quality of life.                            

Six New Genetic Risk Factors for Parkinson’s Found

July 28, 2014 11:36 am | News | Comments

Using data from over 18,000 patients, scientists have identified more than two dozen genetic...

A New Look at Stomach Cancer

July 28, 2014 11:30 am | News | Comments

In a massive effort to catalog the molecular causes of stomach cancer, scientists have...

Scientists ID New Mechanism of Drug Resistance

July 28, 2014 11:24 am | News | Comments

Microorganisms can evade treatment by acquiring mutations in the genes targeted by antibiotics...

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Cooler Bedroom Temperatures May Boost Metabolic Activity

July 28, 2014 11:17 am | News | Comments

A new study has found that turning the thermostat down a few notches at night may expand brown fat tissue mass and activity, which could lead to metabolic benefits such as more effective disposal of glucose.             

Cloning Offers Intriguing Stem Cell-Making Tips

July 28, 2014 10:36 am | by Cynthia Fox | Articles | Comments

Two recent studies— one human, one mouse— have found cloning creates better pluripotent stem cells than the Nobel Prize-winning induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) method. A third study also came out supporting the conclusions.     

Nigeria Death Shows Ebola Can Spread by Air Travel

July 28, 2014 8:21 am | by Heather Murdock - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

Nigerian health authorities raced to stop the spread of Ebola on Saturday after a man sick with one of the world's deadliest diseases brought it by plane to Lagos, Africa's largest city with 21 million people.            

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Fist Bumps Less Germy Than Handshakes

July 28, 2014 12:15 am | by Mike Stobbe - AP Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

When it comes to preventing the spread of germs, maybe the president is on to something with his fondness for fist bumps. The familiar knocking of knuckles spreads only one-twentieth the amount of bacteria that a handshake does, researchers report.

Is Europe Putting Cancer Research at Risk?

July 25, 2014 1:53 pm | News | Comments

The European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO) has expressed concern that the proposed EU General Data Protection Regulation could make cancer research impossible and add a significant burden to both doctors and cancer patients.         

Scientists One Step Closer to Stem Cell Therapy for MS

July 25, 2014 1:29 pm | News | Comments

Scientists at The New York Stem Cell Foundation (NYSCF) Research Institute are one step closer to creating a viable cell replacement therapy for multiple sclerosis from a patient's own cells.                  

Key Muscle Component's Atomic Structure Revealed

July 25, 2014 12:54 pm | News | Comments

In a new study, biophysicists describe– in minute detail- how actin filaments are stabilized at one of their ends to form a basic muscle structure called the sarcomere.                        

Monitoring the Rise and Fall of the Microbiome

July 25, 2014 12:23 pm | News | Comments

Trillions of bacteria live in each person’s digestive tract, but their role in human health is not well understood. To help shed light on the role of these bacteria, a team of researchers recently tracked fluctuations in the bacterial populations of two research subjects over a full year.

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Only 8.2% of DNA is ‘Functional’

July 24, 2014 2:45 pm | News | Comments

Only 8.2 percent of human DNA is likely to be doing something important – is “functional”– say researchers. This figure is very different from one given in 2012, when some scientists stated that 80 percent of our genome has some biochemical function.

Dyes Used to Paint New Picture of Disease

July 24, 2014 2:12 pm | News | Comments

By using brightly hued dyes, George Mason University (GMU) researchers discovered an innovative way to reveal where proteins touch each other, possibly leading to new treatments for cancer, arthritis, heart disease, and even lung disease.

Background TV Can be Bad for Kids

July 24, 2014 1:24 pm | Videos | Comments

Parents, turn off the television when your children are with you. And when you do let them watch, make sure the programs stimulate their interest in learning. At least, that's the advice arising from researchers who examined the impact of television and parenting on children’s social and emotional development.

Researchers Show How Stress Hormones Promote Building of Negative Memories

July 24, 2014 1:16 pm | News | Comments

When a person experiences a devastating loss or tragic event, why does every detail seem burned into memory whereas a host of positive experiences simply fade away? It’s a bit more complicated than scientists originally thought, according to a study.

China Lifts Quarantine in Plague City

July 24, 2014 1:20 am | News | Comments

A nine-day quarantine imposed on parts of a northern Chinese city where a man there died of bubonic plague has been lifted, China's official news agency reported Thursday.                       

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Head of Troubled CDC Anthrax Lab Resigns

July 23, 2014 1:20 pm | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

Health officials say that the head of the government lab which potentially exposed workers to live anthrax has resigned. Michael Farrell was head of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention lab since 2009.            

Try, Try Again? Study Says No

July 23, 2014 11:00 am | News | Comments

In a new study, a team of researchers has found evidence for a factor that contributes to adults’ language difficulties: When learning certain elements of language, adults’ more highly developed cognitive skills actually get in the way.     

Human Platelets Generated in Bioreactor

July 23, 2014 10:47 am | News | Comments

Scientists have developed a scalable, next-generation platelet bioreactor to generate fully functional human platelets in vitro. The work might help address blood transfusion needs worldwide.                  

Researchers ID Mechanism to Clear Diabetes-related Pancreatic Protein

July 23, 2014 10:43 am | News | Comments

People with Type 2 diabetes have an excess of a protein called islet amyloid polypeptide, or IAPP, and the accumulation of this protein is linked to the loss of insulin-producing pancreatic beta cells. Now, a team of researchers may have found a solution in autophagy, a process that clears damaged and toxic proteins from cell.

Mapping Finds New Schizophrenia-linked Genes

July 23, 2014 8:30 am | by Seth Borenstein - AP Science Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

Scientists have linked more than 100 spots in our DNA to the risk of developing schizophrenia, casting light on the mystery of what makes the disease tick. Such work could eventually point to new treatments, although they are many years away.   

Stem Cells Aid Muscle Repair and Strengthening After Resistance Exercise

July 22, 2014 2:10 pm | News | Comments

A new study in mice reveals that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) help rejuvenate skeletal muscle after resistance exercise. By injecting MSCs into mouse leg muscles prior to several bouts of eccentric exercise, researchers were able to increase the rate of repair and enhance the growth and strength of those muscles in the exercising mice.

Researchers Successfully Eliminate the HIV Virus from Cultured Human Cells

July 22, 2014 1:49 pm | Videos | Comments

The HIV-1 virus has proved to be tenacious, inserting its genome permanently into its victims' DNA, forcing patients to take a lifelong drug regimen to control the virus and prevent a fresh attack. Now, a team of Temple University School of Medicine researchers has designed a way to snip out the integrated HIV-1 genes for good.

Mixed Genes Mix Up the Migrations of Hybrid Birds

July 22, 2014 1:23 pm | News | Comments

Mixed genes appear to drive hybrid birds to select more difficult routes than their parent species, according to new research from University of British Columbia zoologists. the researchers harnessed a flock of B.C. Swainson’s thrushes with tiny geolocating backpacks to map their routes as they migrated south through the U.S. to Central and South America.

Breaking News: Lack of Vitamin D Ups Schizophrenia Risk

July 22, 2014 1:17 pm | News | Comments

Vitamin D-deficient individuals are twice as likely to be diagnosed with schizophrenia as people who have sufficient levels of the vitamin, according to a new study.                        

Long-Awaited, Global Trial of Fetal Cells for Parkinson’s

July 21, 2014 2:45 pm | by Cynthia Fox | Articles | Comments

In two months, the first of many new Parkinson’s disease (PD) patients will receive a fetal cell transplant. The transplant will mark the end of a voluntary moratorium by many Western nations after complications arose a decade ago. This, combined with news that embryonic stem (ES) cell PD therapies may also near prime-time, made Parkinson’s a big topic at the recent International Society for Stem Cell Research (ISSCR) meeting.

Metabolic Enzyme Stops Progression of Kidney Cancer

July 21, 2014 1:52 pm | News | Comments

In an analysis of metabolites used by the body to make fuel in normal and cancerous cells in human kidney tissue, a research team identified an enzyme that is key to applying the brakes on tumor growth.              

New Technique Maps Life's Effects on Our DNA

July 21, 2014 1:39 pm | News | Comments

Researchers have developed a powerful new single-cell technique to help investigate how the environment affects our development and the traits we inherit from our parents. The technique can be used to map all of the 'epigenetic marks' on the DNA within a single cell.

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