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The Lead

Proteins May Slow Memory Loss in People With Alzheimer’s

May 22, 2015 10:04 am | by Iowa State University | News | Comments

Certain proteins may slow the devastating memory loss caused by Alzheimer’s disease, according to a study.

Seeking Deeper Understanding of How the Brain Works

May 22, 2015 9:17 am | by MIT | News | Comments

Edward Boyden develops techniques to study the brain, and how it operates, in finer detail.

Women With MRI Abnormality Nine Times More Likely to Get Breast Cancer

May 22, 2015 9:11 am | by Cynthia Fox, Science Writer | Articles | Comments

Healthy women possessing a certain abnormality on MRIs are nine times more likely to get breast...

Panda Gut Bacteria Can’t Efficiently Digest Bamboo

May 21, 2015 10:40 am | by American Society for Microbiology | News | Comments

It’s no wonder that giant pandas are always chewing and eating, say Chinese researchers: their...

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Uncovering Mechanisms of Replication in HPV

May 21, 2015 10:28 am | by Northwestern University | News | Comments

Scientists have identified proteins that mediate aspects of virus replication in the lifecycle of human papillomavirus (HPV), a finding that may lead to new therapeutic targets for treatment of infections caused by the virus.

Genetics Allow Animals to Produce their Own Sunscreen

May 20, 2015 10:33 am | by Joe Shust, Editor, Continuity Insights | Articles | Comments

Researchers have discovered that unique genome sequences allow fish, reptiles, birds and other animals to create a compound that acts as sunscreen.

Study Explains How Early Childhood Vaccination Reduces Leukemia Risk

May 20, 2015 10:09 am | by University of California San Francisco | News | Comments

A team of researchers has discovered how a commonly administered vaccine protects against acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), the most common type of childhood cancer.

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Researchers Identify Potentially Effective Treatment for Methamphetamine Addiction

May 20, 2015 10:07 am | by UCLA | News | Comments

A new study has found that Naltrexone, a drug used to treat alcoholism, may also be a promising treatment for addiction to methamphetamine.

Neuroscientists ID Part of Brain Devoted to Processing Speech

May 19, 2015 9:49 am | by New York University | News | Comments

A team of  neuroscientists has identified a part of the brain exclusively devoted to processing speech. Its findings point to the superior temporal sulcus (STS), located in the temporal lobe, and help settle a long-standing debate about role-specific neurological functions.

Inflammation Stops the Biological Clock

May 19, 2015 9:33 am | by University of Pennsylvania | News | Comments

An important link between the human body clock and the immune system has relevance for better understanding inflammatory and infectious diseases, researchers discovered.

Designing Better Medical Implants

May 19, 2015 9:09 am | by Anne Trafton, MIT | News | Comments

Optimal size and shape allow implantable devices to last longer in the body.

Genetic Test for Heightened Prostate Cancer Risk Touted

May 19, 2015 9:01 am | by Seth Augenstein, Digital Reporter | News | Comments

A new genetic test to determine risk factors for prostate cancer can help target the men most likely to develop aggressive forms for the cancer – and make screening a priority for them, according to research presented yesterday at the American Urology Association’s annual conference.

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Cognition Improves After Supplemented Mediterranean Diet, Finds a Rare Trial

May 19, 2015 8:54 am | by Cynthia Fox, Science Writer | Articles | Comments

Cognition improves in older people who eat a plant-based Mediterranean diet with antioxidant-rich extra virgin olive oil or mixed nuts, according to rare clinical trial research published by JAMA Internal Medicine.

Hong Kong to Use DNA Technology to Publicly Shame Litterbugs

May 18, 2015 11:42 am | by Seth Augenstein, Digital Reporter | Articles | Comments

DNA phenotyping is just starting to be used to track down criminals, generate new leads on cold-case homicides, and put faces to unidentified and missing people. Now in Hong Kong, it’s being used to threaten litterbugs with public shame, according to organizers of a new anti-polluting campaign.

Drug Perks Up Old Muscles and Aging Brains

May 18, 2015 9:39 am | by University of California Berkeley | News | Comments

Whether you’re brainy, brawny or both, you may someday benefit from a drug found to rejuvenate aging brain and muscle tissue.

Orange Juice is Good for Your Brain

May 18, 2015 9:16 am | by Unviersity of Reading | News | Comments

Drinking orange juice could help improve brain function in elderly people, according to new research from the University of Reading.

Great White Shark Cruising East Coast Becomes Twitter Star

May 18, 2015 9:04 am | by Philip Marcelo, Associated Press | News | Comments

An organization studying great white sharks is enjoying some welcome attention after one of the creatures they've been monitoring started gaining a loyal social media following. (at)MaryLeeShark is the fake Twitter handle for a very real, nearly 3,500-pound great white whose movements can be tracked online and in real time.

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Five Biotech Startups to Check Out This Month

May 18, 2015 8:53 am | by Ryan Bushey, Associate Editor | Articles | Comments

These companies are having an interesting year so far.

Vitamin D Levels Help Predict Survival of Sick Cats

May 15, 2015 10:39 am | by Bevin Fletcher, Associate Editor | Articles | Comments

Vitamin D could give your sickly feline friend its 10th life, according to a recent study. New research from the University of Edinburgh found that higher levels of vitamin D were linked to increased survival changes for hospitalized cats.

Diagnosing Sepsis through Genetic Signature

May 15, 2015 9:11 am | by Stanford University | News | Comments

Investigators at the Stanford University School of Medicine have identified a pattern of gene activity that could help scientists create a blood test for quickly and accurately detecting whether patients are experiencing a deadly immune-system panic attack.

Electrical Stimulation Accelerates Wound Healing

May 15, 2015 8:54 am | by University of Manchester | News | Comments

The most detailed study to date showing how electrical stimulation accelerates wound healing has been carried out in 40 volunteers by University of Manchester scientists.

How a Smartphone Camera Can Find Eye Cancer

May 15, 2015 8:23 am | by Ryan Bushey, Associate Editor | Videos | Comments

ABC News featured an interview with Julie Fitzgerald, a mom who noticed a white glow in her son Avery’s eye after taking a picture of him with her smartphone. 

Creating a Dinosaur Snout in Bird Embryos, Science Forces Step Back in Evolution

May 14, 2015 10:08 am | by Seth Augenstein, Digital Reporter | News | Comments

By replicating the fossil record, a group of researchers has successfully turned back the clock on evolution. An Ivy League team recreated a dinosaur’s snout on bird embryos, reversing millions of years of natural selection.

Baboons Prefer to Spend Time with Others of the Same Age, Status and Personality

May 14, 2015 10:03 am | by University of Cambridge | News | Comments

Latest research shows that, within large troops, baboons spend more time grooming those with similar dominance rank and boldness to themselves. Preferring such grooming partners may prevent new skills and knowledge being transmitted around the wider troop, say researchers.

Study: Vitamin B3 May Help Prevent Certain Skin Cancers

May 14, 2015 9:55 am | by Marilynn Marchione, AP Chief Medical Writer | News | Comments

For the first time, a large study suggests that a vitamin might modestly lower the risk of the most common types of skin cancer in people with a history of these relatively harmless yet troublesome growths.

Brains of Smokers Who Quit Successfully Might be Wired for Success

May 14, 2015 9:33 am | by Duke University | News | Comments

Smokers who are able to quit might actually be hard-wired for success, according to a study from Duke Medicine.

Personalized Screening Test for Ovarian Cancer Shows Encouraging Results

May 13, 2015 9:32 am | by Ryan Bushey, Associate Editor | Articles | Comments

Standard versions of this screening process would have only been able to pinpoint ovarian cancer in less than half of this group.

Brain Cells Capable of "Early-career" Switch

May 13, 2015 9:27 am | by Salk Institute for Biological Studies | News | Comments

Scientists find a single molecule that controls the fate of mature sensory neurons.

Scientists Link Brain Protein to Binge-Drinking Behavior

May 12, 2015 10:11 am | by The Scripps Research Institute | News | Comments

Scientists have discovered that a brain protein has a key role in controlling binge drinking in animal models. They found that deleting the gene for this protein in mice ramped up alcohol consumption and prevented the brain from signaling the rewarding properties of alcohol. 

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