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The Lead

Growing New Bones without a Human Body

May 5, 2015 12:56 pm | by Ryan Bushey, Associate Editor | Videos | Comments

This start-up found a unique way to help the 900,000 patients who have to go through bone-related surgeries each year.

Fungus Enhances Crop Roots and Could Be a Future 'Bio-fertilizer'

May 5, 2015 11:36 am | by University of Cambridge | News | Comments

“Ancient relationship” between fungi and plant roots creates genetic expression that leads to...

Researchers Say Off-Label Use of Device to Prevent Stroke May Be Dangerous

May 5, 2015 11:22 am | by University of Pennsylvania | News | Comments

Findings suggest need for FDA reassessment of safety and efficacy of devices for off-label use...

Diabetes Sugars and Alzheimer’s Brain Plaques Potentially Linked

May 5, 2015 11:12 am | by Seth Augenstein, Digital Reporter | Articles | Comments

Diabetes and Alzheimer’s could have a cause-and-effect connection, according to a study...

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Potentially Reversible Driver of Aging Found

May 5, 2015 11:01 am | by Cynthia Fox, Science Writer | Articles | Comments

Using stem cells and gene editing, researchers have unearthed a major driver of aging, from cancer to diabetes. That driver: loss of heterochromatin, which is potentially reversible as it is an epigenetic process that does not initially forge permanent gene mutations.

Telomere Changes Predict Cancer

May 5, 2015 10:27 am | by Northwestern University | News | Comments

A distinct pattern in the changing length of blood telomeres, the protective end caps on our DNA strands, can predict cancer many years before actual diagnosis, according to a new study.

How Studying Bat Touch Could Help Build Better Planes

May 4, 2015 10:45 am | by Columbia University | News | Comments

A study published April 30 in Cell Reports shows, for the first time, that a unique array of sensory receptors in the wing provides feedback to a bat during flight. The findings also suggest that neurons in the bat brain respond to incoming airflow and touch signals, triggering rapid adjustments in wing position to optimize flight control.

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How Some Beetles Produce a Scalding Defensive Spray

May 4, 2015 10:37 am | by David L. Chandler, MIT | News | Comments

New analysis shows how bombardier beetles produce an explosive defensive chemical jet.

How to Short-Circuit Hunger

May 4, 2015 10:20 am | by Harvard University | News | Comments

Artificially activating a neural link in mice can reduce eating without chronic hunger.

Vital Step in Stem Cell Growth Revealed

May 4, 2015 10:06 am | by Salk Institute for Biological Studies | News | Comments

Stem cells, which have the potential to turn into any kind of cell, offer the tantalizing possibility of generating new tissues for organ replacements, stroke victims and patients of many other diseases. Now, scientists have uncovered details about stem cell growth that could help improve regenerative therapies.

Researchers Find Bitter Taste Receptors on Human Hearts

May 4, 2015 9:38 am | by University of Queensland | News | Comments

A team of researchers is investigating the surprising discovery that smell and taste receptors normally found in the nose and mouth can also be present on the human heart.

Space madness: Long-term Space Trips Could Impair Astronaut Brains

May 1, 2015 2:59 pm | by Seth Augenstein, Digital Reporter | Articles | Comments

When NASA first began sending astronauts out into space, they worried about “space madness” – a malady they thought weightlessness and claustrophobia would trigger out beyond the atmosphere of the earth. It never materialized. But they may have been on to something.

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Researchers Create DNA Repair Map of Entire Human Genome

May 1, 2015 10:20 am | by UNC | News | Comments

The new experimental assay can help scientists find the precise locations of repair of DNA damage caused by UV radiation and common chemotherapies. The invention could lead to better cancer drugs or improvements in the potency of existing ones.

DNA Suggests All Early Eskimos Migrated from North Slope

May 1, 2015 10:04 am | by Northewestern University | News | Comments

First evidence to genetically tie all Inuit populations to Alaska's North Slope. Genetic testing of Iñupiat people currently living in Alaska’s North Slope is helping scientists fill in the blanks on questions about the migration patterns and ancestral pool of the people who populated the North American Arctic over the last 5,000 years.

Stem Cells Transplanted, Followed in Brain

May 1, 2015 9:42 am | by Stanford University | News | Comments

The ability to detect successful engraftment, integration and function of human cells implanted into the brain of a living animal could potentially speed stem-cell therapies’ path to clinical use.

A New Way to Think About Migraines

May 1, 2015 9:28 am | by Bevin Fletcher, Associate Editor | Articles | Comments

This is the second of three research findings highlighted by Dr. Rost, vice chair of the American Academy of Neurology Science Committee, at the AAN 67th annual meeting.

Brain Scan Reveals Out-of-Body Illusion

May 1, 2015 9:20 am | by Karolinska Institutet | News | Comments

The feeling of being inside one’s own body is not as self-evident as one might think. In a new study neuroscientists created an out-of-body illusion in participants placed inside a brain scanner. They then used the illusion to perceptually ‘teleport’ the participants to different locations in a room and show that the perceived location of the bodily self can be decoded from activity patterns in specific brain regions.

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Foreign Antibodies Fight Cancer

April 30, 2015 10:13 am | by Stanford University | News | Comments

A mouse’s T cells can be primed to attack and eliminate a malignant tumor by injecting antibodies from another mouse with resistance to the tumor, as well as by activating certain signaling cells, a study has found.

How the Brain Tells Good From Bad

April 30, 2015 10:04 am | by Anne Trafton, MIT | News | Comments

Eating a slice of chocolate cake or spending time with a friend usually stimulates positive feelings, while getting in a car accident or anticipating a difficult exam is more likely to generate a fearful or anxious response.

3 Boys Saved by Customized Airway Tube Made on 3-D Printer

April 30, 2015 9:04 am | by Lauren Neergaard, Associated Press Medical Writer | News | Comments

In a striking example of how 3-D printers could customize medical care, doctors turned powdered plastic into tiny devices that saved the lives of three baby boys by holding open defective airways so they could breathe - and the implants even expanded as the tots grew.

Cardiorespiratory Fitness Contributes to Successful Brain Aging

April 29, 2015 10:08 am | by Boston University | News | Comments

Cardiorespiratory fitness may positively impact the structure of white matter in the brains of older adults. These results suggest that exercise could be prescribed to lessen age-related declines in brain structure.

Bringing Order to Big Data of Human Biology

April 29, 2015 10:02 am | by Simons Foundation | News | Comments

'Network-guided association study,' or NetWAS, led to identification of gene interaction networks for organs as diverse as the kidney, the liver and the whole brain.

Rare Dune Plants Thrive on Disturbance

April 29, 2015 9:53 am | by Washington University in St. Louis | News | Comments

Stabilizing dunes suppresses native species and makes the dunes themselves more prone to erosion.

New Technology Speeds Analysis of Whole Genome Sequence Tenfold

April 29, 2015 9:10 am | News | Comments

 Results achieved in approximately six hours, compared to 60 hours with standard software.  

Genetics Startup Raises $15M to Launch Low-Cost Cancer Tests

April 29, 2015 8:57 am | by Ryan Bushey, Associate Editor | Articles | Comments

The test can assess the risk for breast and ovarian cancer.

Affordable Personalized RNA Cancer Vaccine Works, Aided by CD4 T Cells

April 29, 2015 8:53 am | by Cynthia Fox, Science Writer | News | Comments

A team from Johannes Gutenberg University engineered a relatively cheap, and comparatively easy-to-make, personalized vaccine—and wiped out lung, skin, and colon cancer cells in mice.

Genocea's GEN-003 in Prime Position to Lead GH Vaccine Space

April 28, 2015 1:08 pm | by Daian Cheng, Ph.D., GlobalData Infectious Disease Analyst | Articles | Comments

An analysis of Genocea Biosciences’ investigational genital herpes (GH) vaccine, GEN-003. 

Scientists Uncover Surprising New Details of Potential Alzheimer’s Treatment

April 28, 2015 10:14 am | by TSRI | News | Comments

Scientists have uncovered some surprising details of a group of compounds that have shown significant potential in stimulating the growth of brain cells and memory restoration in animal models that mimic Alzheimer’s disease.

Microneedle Patch for Measles Vaccination Could be Global Game Changer

April 28, 2015 10:08 am | by Georgia Institute of Technology | News | Comments

A new microneedle patch being developed by the Georgia Institute of Technology and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) could make it easier to vaccinate people against measles and other vaccine-preventable diseases.

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