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UCLA to Help Biologists, Doctors Mine 'Big Data'

December 19, 2014 9:45 am | by Eryn Brown, UCLA | News | Comments

Millions upon millions of medical records and test results. Countless DNA sequences. Hard drives stuffed with images of all kinds - pictures of cells, scans of body parts. It's all part of the deluge of information often known as "big data," an ever-growing stockpile of digital material that scientists hope will reveal insights about biology and lead to improvements in medical care.
 

Healthy Brain Development Balanced on Edge of Cellular 'Sword'

December 18, 2014 5:09 pm | by Bill Hathaway, Yale University | News | Comments

A new Yale-led study of children with neurodevelopmental abnormalities of the brain identifies a...

Serotonin Neuron Subtypes

December 18, 2014 4:37 pm | by Stephanie Dutchen, Harvard Medical School | News | Comments

Neuroscientists have proposed that brain cells come in different subtypes that have...

'Master Regulator' Gene Can Stimulate Other Genes in Early Brain Development

December 18, 2014 4:10 pm | by NYU | News | Comments

Chemical modifications to DNA’s packaging — known as epigenetic changes — can activate or...

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10 Up-and-Coming Healthcare Medical Innovations

December 17, 2014 5:32 pm | by Christina Jakubowski, Managing Editor | Articles | Comments

The Cleveland Clinic recently unveiled their annual Top 10 Medical Innovations for 2015– a list that casts an optimistic light on up-and-coming healthcare advances that may reach consumers next year.                                       

New Lens-Free Microscope Detects Cancer At Cellular Level

December 17, 2014 4:27 pm | by UCLA | News | Comments

Researchers have developed a lens-free microscope that can be used to detect the presence of cancer or other cell-level abnormalities with the same accuracy as larger and more expensive optical microscopes.         

Reading Leaves a Dramatic Imprint on the Brain

December 17, 2014 4:23 pm | by Cynthia Fox, Science Writer | Articles | Comments

A good book recreates the world so robustly that it activates some of the same brain regions that “everyday life” does, according to a recent PLOS One study. In the study, innovative MRI analyses of people reading a richly imaginative book showed movement of characters occurring in a brain region where others’ motions are processed in the real world.

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Insight Into How Brain Motor Neurons Die During ALS

December 17, 2014 4:13 pm | by Thomas Jefferson University | News | Comments

Researchers look to understand the causes of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), in the hope of finding new ways to treat the disease. A new study published online in the Cell Press journal Neuron shows that a common gene mutation in ALS generates a deadly protein that may cause the damage in the brain that leads to ALS.

Stem Cells Faulty in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

December 17, 2014 4:03 pm | by Stanford University | News | Comments

Like human patients, mice with a form of Duchenne muscular dystrophy undergo progressive muscle degeneration and accumulate connective tissue as they age. Now, researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine have found that the fault may lie at least partly in the stem cells that surround the muscle fibers.

Brain-Injury Program Working With NFL Players

December 17, 2014 11:07 am | by Associated Press | News | Comments

A brain-injury treatment program originally designed for military veterans injured on the battlefield has been updated to include professional athletes. Representatives with the Eisenhower Center announced that it will be the primary facility used by the NFL Players Association for treating brain injuries and other neurological issues through the After the Impact program.  

Targeted Computer Games Can Change Behavior of Psychopaths

December 17, 2014 11:03 am | by NYU Langone | News | Comments

Psychopaths generally do not feel fear and fail to consider the emotions of others, or reflect upon their behavior — traits that make them notoriously difficult to treat.                                              

New Technology Advances Eye Tracking As Biomarker for Brain Function

December 17, 2014 10:59 am | by NYU Langone | News | Comments

Researchers at NYU Langone Medical Center have developed  new technology that can assess the location and impact of a brain injury merely by tracking the eye movements of patients as they watch music videos for less than four minutes, according to a study publishedin the Journal of Neurosurgery.

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Thumbs-Up for Mind-Controlled Robotic Arm

December 17, 2014 10:44 am | News | Comments

A paralysed woman who controlled a robotic arm using just her thoughts has taken another step towards restoring her natural movements by controlling the arm with a range of complex hand movements.                                             

Novel Tool to Study Life-Threatening Arrhythmias: A Genetically Engineered Pig

December 17, 2014 10:18 am | by NYU Langone | News | Comments

Researchers at NYU Langone Medical Center have developed the first large animal model of an inherited arrhythmic syndrome – an advance that will lead to a better understanding of the biologic mechanisms important in normal heart conduction and rhythm. 

Women in Cell Biology Award Winners Announced at ASCB Meeting

December 17, 2014 10:05 am | by Stephanie Guzowski, Editor, Drug Discovery & Development | Articles | Comments

Three exceptional women were given awards for their achievements and contributions to the scientific community at the 2014 ASCB (American Society for Cell Biology) meeting recently held in Philadelphia, Pa.

Going After Colon Cancer With Strep Bacteria

December 17, 2014 9:40 am | by Skip Derra, Contributing Writer | Articles | Comments

A novel therapeutic to fight colon cancer by using the bacteria primarily responsible for causing strep throat is being explored in the labs of John McCormick of the Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry at the University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada.

Interactions Between Proteins Govern Tumor Suppression, Aging

December 16, 2014 12:54 pm | by UC Davis | News | Comments

Scientists have long known the p53 protein suppresses tumors. However, a recent animal study by UC Davis researchers has uncovered a complicated relationship between p53 and another protein, Rbm38, highlighting how the body calibrates protein levels. Too much Rbm38 reduces p53 levels, increasing the risk of cancer. Too little Rbm38 allows p53 overexpression, causing premature aging.

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Which Dot Will They Hunt?

December 16, 2014 12:28 pm | by Max Planck Institute | News | Comments

Scientists are now able to shed light on important neural circuitry involved in the prey capture behavior of young zebrafish.                       

Protecting The Brain

December 16, 2014 12:18 pm | by Cory Burris, Dalhousie University | News | Comments

New research focuses of detecting and treating damage to blood vessels in the brain.                              

Predicting Sepsis

December 16, 2014 11:56 am | by Susan McGreevey, Harvard Medical School | News | Comments

A team of investigators has identified what may be a biomarker predicting the development of sepsis.                           

Technology Directly Reprograms Skin Cells for New Role

December 16, 2014 11:29 am | by University of Pennsylvania | News | Comments

Scientists have discovered a way to repurpose fibroblasts into functional melanocytes.                             

'Super Bacteria' Found in Rio's Olympic Waters

December 16, 2014 11:21 am | by Jenny Barchfield - Associated Press | News | Comments

A drug-resistant super bacteria that's normally found in hospitals and is notoriously difficult to treat has been discovered in the waters where Rio de Janeiro's Olympic sailing events will be held.           

Proteins Drive Cancer Cells to Change States

December 16, 2014 11:12 am | News | Comments

A new study implicates a family of RNA-binding proteins in the regulation of cancer.                              

Neuronal Circuits Filter Out Distractions in the Brain

December 15, 2014 1:32 pm | by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory | News | Comments

The next time you are in a crowded room, or a meeting, or even at the park with your kids, take a look around. How many people are on their phone? Distractions invade every aspect of our lives. Status updates, text messages, email notifications all threaten to steal our attention away from the moment. 

Tackling One of The Biggest Questions in Dementia Research

December 15, 2014 12:09 pm | News | Comments

Researchers in Southampton are tackling one of the biggest questions in dementia research; why might current approaches in Alzheimer’s trials be failing? The new study is published in the Journal of Pathology and funded by Alzheimer’s Research UK and the Medical Research Council.          

Cancer Patients Testing Drugs on Mouse Avatars

December 15, 2014 11:58 am | by Marilynn Marchione - AP Chief Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

They are paying a private lab to breed mice that carry bits of their own tumors so treatments can be tried first on the customized rodents.                    

Signaling Mechanism Could be Target for Survival, Growth of Tumor Cells

December 15, 2014 11:54 am | by UT Southwestern | News | Comments

UT Southwestern Medical Center neurology researchers have identified an important cell signaling mechanism that plays an important role in brain cancer and may provide a new therapeutic target.                                 

Robotic Surgery Tool Treats Previously Inoperable Head and Neck Cancer

December 15, 2014 11:47 am | News | Comments

Researchers have advanced a robotic surgical technique to successfully access a previously unreachable area of the head and neck.                      

Blow to Chest Could Trigger Potentially Dangerous Heart Rhythm

December 15, 2014 11:39 am | News | Comments

A hard hit to the chest can cause an irregular heartbeat that may lead to death even days after the impact.                           

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