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The Lead

Bioscience Bulletin: Doubts about DNA, the Impact of Digital Health, Cancer-fighting Magnolias

July 2, 2015 3:12 pm | by Bevin Fletcher, Associate Editor | News | Comments

Welcome to Bioscience Technology’s new series Bioscience Bulletin, where we bring you the five most popular headlines from the week.

Researchers Define Unique Group of High-Risk Lymphoma Patients

July 2, 2015 11:15 am | by University of Rochester | News | Comments

The goal for many cancer patients is to reach the five-year, disease-free mark, but new research...

Too Exhausted to Fight – and to Do Harm

July 2, 2015 10:58 am | by University of Cambridge | News | Comments

An ‘exhausted’ army of immune cells may not be able to fight off infection, but if its soldiers...

Forgetfulness and Errors Can Signal Alzheimer’s Decades Before Diagnosis

July 2, 2015 10:29 am | by Seth Augenstein, Digital Reporter | News | Comments

Mistakes on memory and thought tests may give an indication of the future onset of Alzheimer’s,...

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Ex-Iowa State Scientist Gets Prison for Faking HIV Research

July 2, 2015 10:15 am | by David Pitt, Associated Press | News | Comments

A former Iowa State University scientist who altered blood samples to make it appear he had achieved a breakthrough toward a potential vaccine against HIV was sentenced Wednesday to more than 4 1/2 years in prison for making false statements in research reports.

Rearming Immune Cells Blasts Ovarian Cancer in Mice

July 2, 2015 9:47 am | by Cynthia Fox, Science Writer | Articles | Comments

One reason ovarian cancer is so deadly: it turns off immune cells that try to fight it. A Weill Cornell Medical College team has found that disarming a gene called XBP1 rearms immune cells—which successfully combat ovarian cancer.

Microarray for Research into Haematological and Solid Cancers

July 1, 2015 12:56 pm | Product Releases | Comments

Oxford Gene Technology (OGT) released a new microarray designed to improve the accuracy and efficiency of cancer research. The CytoSure Cancer +SNP array (4x180k) combines long oligo array comparative genomic hybridisation (aCGH) probes with fully validated single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) content.

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Failure of Cells’ ‘Garbage Disposal’ System May Contribute to Alzheimer’s

July 1, 2015 12:54 pm | by Yale University | News | Comments

Lysosomes, the “garbage disposal” systems of cells, are found in great abundance near the amyloid plaques in the brain that are a hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease. Scientists have long assumed that their presence was helpful — that they were degrading the toxic proteins that trigger amyloid plaque formation.  

Researchers Develop Innovative Gene Transfer-based Treatment Approach

July 1, 2015 12:37 pm | by UNC | News | Comments

The experimental treatment uses a genetically modified virus to deliver a missing gene into the cerebrospinal fluid of children with giant axonal neuropathy (GAN).

Stem Cell Gene Therapy Holds Promise for Eliminating HIV Infection

July 1, 2015 10:48 am | by UCLA | News | Comments

Scientists are one step closer to engineering a tool that could one day arm the body’s immune system to fight HIV — and win. The new technique harnesses the regenerative capacity of stem cells to generate an immune response to the virus.

A First: New Guidelines Back Device for Treating Strokes

July 1, 2015 9:58 am | by Marilynn Marchione, AP Chief Medical Writer | News | Comments

Many stroke patients have a new treatment option -- if they seek help fast enough to get it. New guidelines endorse using a removable stent to open clogged arteries causing a stroke.

His and Her Pain Circuitry in the Spinal Cord

June 30, 2015 10:28 am | by McGill University | News | Comments

New animal research reveals fundamental sex differences in how pain is processed.

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TSRI and Biotech Partners Find New Antibody Weapons Against Marburg Virus

June 29, 2015 10:08 am | by TSRI | News | Comments

A new study identifies new immune molecules that protect against deadly Marburg virus, a relative of Ebola virus.

Low Scores on Memory and Thinking Tests May Signal Alzheimer’s Earlier than Thought

June 29, 2015 9:50 am | by American Academy of Neurology | News | Comments

A new study suggests that errors on memory and thinking tests may signal Alzheimer’s up to 18 years before the disease can be diagnosed.

DNA Damage Linked with Dementia

June 29, 2015 9:30 am | by University of Sheffield | News | Comments

High levels of DNA damage in nerve cells can lead to dementia, researchers  have found.

Major Step for Implantable Drug Delivery Device

June 29, 2015 9:21 am | by MIT | News | Comments

An implantable, microchip-based device may soon replace the injections and pills now needed to treat chronic diseases.

Scientists Look into Why Most Alzheimer's Patients are Women

June 29, 2015 9:13 am | by Lauran Neergaard, AP Medical Writer | News | Comments

Nearly two-thirds of Americans with Alzheimer's disease are women, and now some scientists are questioning the long-held assumption that it's just because they tend to live longer than men.

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Diagnosing Ebola in Minutes

June 26, 2015 10:54 am | by Harvard University | News | Comments

A  new test can accurately diagnose the Ebola virus disease within minutes at the point of care, providing clinicians with crucial, on-the-spot information for treating patients and containing outbreaks.

Cancer Drug Prolongs Life in Flies

June 26, 2015 10:42 am | by Max Planck Institute | News | Comments

Trametinib inhibits the same signal pathway in flies and humans and could thus conceivably also extend life expectancy in humans.

Compound in Magnolia May Combat Head and Neck Cancers

June 26, 2015 10:13 am | by U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs | News | Comments

Honokiol, from magnolia bark, shuts down cancer cells in lab.

Redrawing Language Map of the Brain

June 26, 2015 9:56 am | by Northwestern University | News | Comments

Old beliefs upended as dementia research yields new locations for word and sentence comprehension.

High Blood Pressure Linked to Reduced Alzheimer's Risk, Meds May be Reason

June 26, 2015 9:46 am | by Brigham Young University | News | Comments

A new study suggests that people with a genetic predisposition to high blood pressure have a lower risk for Alzheimer's disease.

Drug Discovery for Parkinson's: Researchers Grow Neurons in 3-D

June 25, 2015 10:20 am | by University of Luxembourg | News | Comments

Researchers have now managed to grow the types of neurons affected by Parkinson's starting from neuronal stem cells in a three-dimensional cell culture system.

Study Suggests New Treatment for Impulsivity in Some Dementia Patients

June 25, 2015 10:06 am | by University of Cambridge | News | Comments

Restoring the low levels of the chemical serotonin may help improve brain function and reduce impulsivity in some dementia patients, according to researchers.

Study Hints at Why Parrots are Great Vocal Imitators

June 25, 2015 9:54 am | by Duke University | News | Comments

An international team of scientists has uncovered key structural differences in the brains of parrots that may explain the birds' unparalleled ability to imitate sounds and human speech.

Alzheimer’s Expert Jams with Aerosmith

June 25, 2015 9:44 am | by Bevin Fletcher, Associate Editor | Articles | Comments

One of the world’s leading Alzheimer’s researchers doubles as a guest organist for Aerosmith.

Future Antibiotics

June 25, 2015 9:35 am | by MIT | News | Comments

Researchers have engineered particles, known as “phagemids,” capable of producing toxins that are deadly to targeted bacteria.

Memory Does Not Require Permanent Synapses in the Hippocampus

June 24, 2015 11:14 am | by Max Planck Institute | News | Comments

Scientists study how new impressions are transferred in long-term memory.

Research Sheds Light on How Neurons Control Muscle Movement

June 24, 2015 11:04 am | by Stanford University | News | Comments

Researchers studying how the brain controls movement in people with paralysis, related to their diagnosis of Lou Gehrig’s disease, have found that groups of neurons work together, firing in complex rhythms to signal muscles about when and where to move.

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