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Genomes Help Map Early Humans' Route Out of Africa

May 29, 2015 10:12 am | by Cell Press | News | Comments

New genomic analyses of people currently living in Ethiopia and Egypt indicate that Egypt was the major gateway out of Africa and that migration followed a northern rather than a southern route.

Autism Linked to Genetic Mutation – and Researchers Say They Can Undo it

May 28, 2015 12:14 pm | by Seth Augenstein, Digital Reporter | News | Comments

The genetic roots of autism have been investigated for more than a decade, as DNA sequencing has...

Zebrafish Model Gives New Insight on Autism Spectrum Disorder

May 28, 2015 9:46 am | by University of Miami | News | Comments

Study of zebrafish reveals how dysfunction of SHANK3 or SYNGAP1 genes play a role in the...

A New Era for Genetic Interpretation

May 28, 2015 9:30 am | by UNC | News | Comments

Researchers are collaborating through the ClinGen consortium to pinpoint disease-causing genetic...

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Study Reveals Flaws in Gene Testing; Results Often Conflict

May 28, 2015 9:04 am | by Marilynn Marchione, AP Chief Medical Writer | News | Comments

The first report from a big public-private project to improve genetic testing reveals it is not as rock solid as many people believe, with flaws that result in some people wrongly advised to worry about a disease risk and others wrongly told they can relax.

From Worker to Queen at the Drop of a Gene

May 27, 2015 9:36 am | by University of Leicester | News | Comments

Researchers discover the genes that cause the buff-tailed bumblebee to develop into a male, worker or queen.

Master Gene Regulator Could be New Target for Schizophrenia Treatment

May 26, 2015 10:12 am | by MIT | News | Comments

Researchers have identified a master genetic regulator that could account for faulty brain functions that contribute to schizophrenia.

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Study Maps Prenatal Cells

May 26, 2015 9:57 am | by UCLA | News | Comments

Research delivers new data for stem cell scientists to more accurately study infertility.

Genetics Allow Animals to Produce their Own Sunscreen

May 20, 2015 10:33 am | by Joe Shust, Editor, Continuity Insights | Articles | Comments

Researchers have discovered that unique genome sequences allow fish, reptiles, birds and other animals to create a compound that acts as sunscreen.

Diagnosing Sepsis through Genetic Signature

May 15, 2015 9:11 am | by Stanford University | News | Comments

Investigators at the Stanford University School of Medicine have identified a pattern of gene activity that could help scientists create a blood test for quickly and accurately detecting whether patients are experiencing a deadly immune-system panic attack.

Improved Accuracy in Genome Editing

May 11, 2015 9:52 am | by Harvard Gazette | News | Comments

Scientists engineer helpful protein that has greatly increased specificity

Researchers Create DNA Repair Map of Entire Human Genome

May 1, 2015 10:20 am | by UNC | News | Comments

The new experimental assay can help scientists find the precise locations of repair of DNA damage caused by UV radiation and common chemotherapies. The invention could lead to better cancer drugs or improvements in the potency of existing ones.

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Bringing Order to Big Data of Human Biology

April 29, 2015 10:02 am | by Simons Foundation | News | Comments

'Network-guided association study,' or NetWAS, led to identification of gene interaction networks for organs as diverse as the kidney, the liver and the whole brain.

New Technology Speeds Analysis of Whole Genome Sequence Tenfold

April 29, 2015 9:10 am | News | Comments

 Results achieved in approximately six hours, compared to 60 hours with standard software.  

Genetics Startup Raises $15M to Launch Low-Cost Cancer Tests

April 29, 2015 8:57 am | by Ryan Bushey, Associate Editor | Articles | Comments

The test can assess the risk for breast and ovarian cancer.

Gene Associated with Rare Disease Determines How Body Processes Pain

April 28, 2015 8:58 am | by Institut de Recherches Cliniques de Montreal | News | Comments

Researchers uncovered the critical role in pain processing of a gene associated with a rare disease. Their breakthrough, published in The Journal of Neuroscience, paves the way for a better understanding of chronic pain conditions.

CDC Using New Technology to Track Listeria Illnesses

April 23, 2015 10:35 am | by Mary Clare Jalonick | News | Comments

The government is relying on some new technology - as well as a bit of luck - to track an outbreak of life-threatening listeria linked to Blue Bell ice cream products.

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International Team Cracks Genetic Code of Upland Cotton

April 23, 2015 9:42 am | by Clemson University | News | Comments

The intricately woven genetic makeup of Upland cotton has been decoded for the first time in the ancient plant’s history.

DNA Abnormalities Found in Children with Chronic Kidney Disease

April 22, 2015 10:18 am | by Columbia University | News | Comments

Routine genetic screening of children with CKD could lead to earlier, more precise diagnoses.

Noise-related Hearing Loss Might be in Your Genes

April 17, 2015 9:29 am | by Bevin Fletcher, Associate Editor | News | Comments

A genome-wide association study conducted by an international team led by the University of Southern California identified Nox3 as a critical gene for susceptibility to noise-induced hearing loss in mice.  The gene, which is almost exclusively expressed in the inner ear, was identified in a study published in the April 16 edition of PLOS Genetics.

Rare, Deadly Lymphoma Demystified

April 16, 2015 10:46 am | by Columbia University | News | Comments

Findings identify a cause of the disease and highlight potential therapeutic approach.

Study Questions Accuracy of Certain Tumor-only Gene Mapping

April 16, 2015 9:23 am | by Lauran Neergaard, Medical Writer, Associated Press | News | Comments

More cancer patients are getting the genes in their tumors mapped to help guide their treatment. New research suggests that isn't always accurate enough, and a second test could help ferret out the culprit genes.

A Guide to Targeted NGS: Generating Accurate Data for Personalized Medicine

April 15, 2015 8:57 am | by Ellen Prediger, Ph.D., Senior Writer, Integrated DNA Technologies (IDT) | Articles | Comments

As personalized medicine is integrated into mainstream medical treatment, sequencing clinically relevant genes using the latest next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies will prove instrumental in guiding clinicians towards informed treatment decisions.

Mountain Gorilla Genome Study Provides Optimism About Population Numbers

April 14, 2015 10:41 am | by University of Cambridge | News | Comments

An international research project to sequence whole genomes from mountain gorillas has given scientists and conservationists new insight into the impact of population decline on these critically endangered apes. While mountain gorillas are extensively inbred and at risk of extinction, research published today in Science finds more to be optimistic about in their genomes than expected.

Peltier-Cooled Incubators

April 10, 2015 10:00 am | Product Releases | Comments

Thermo Scientific Peltier-cooled incubators feature solid-state Peltier cooling designed for biological and genomics laboratory researchers engaged in fruit fly and biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) research.

The First Personalized Genomic Cancer Vaccines

April 8, 2015 9:10 am | by Cynthia Fox, Science Writer | Articles | Comments

The first personalized cancer vaccine using genomics to define targets elicits robust immune responses, says a recent Science study.

Study Identifies Protein Associated with Lupus

April 7, 2015 9:49 am | by Massachusetts General Hospital | News | Comments

Investigators have identified an inflammatory molecule that appears to play an essential role in the autoimmune disorder commonly known as lupus.  Researchers describe finding that a protein that regulates certain cells in the innate immune system activates a molecular pathway known to be associated with lupus and that the protein’s activity is required for the development of lupus symptoms in a mouse model of the disease.

New Genetic Clues Emerge on Origin of Hirschsprung's Disease

April 6, 2015 2:12 pm | by Johns Hopkins | News | Comments

Genetic studies in humans, zebrafish and mice have revealed how two different types of genetic variations team up to cause a rare condition called Hirschsprung’s disease.

3-D Human Skin Maps Aid Study of Relationships Between Molecules, Microbes and Environment

March 31, 2015 4:39 pm | by University of Calif, San Diego | News | Comments

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences used information collected from hundreds of skin swabs to produce three-dimensional maps of molecular and microbial variations across the body. 

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