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The Lead

Alzheimer's Disease Linked to Heart's Effect on the Brain

March 2, 2015 10:53 am | by University of Sydney | News | Comments

The prevailing medical wisdom that Alzheimer's Disease has its origins in the brain has a radical and disputed rival with shocking implications for medicine's relentless efforts to forestall disease, ageing and death, according to a new review of the evidence.

Perception of Food Consumption Overrides Reality

March 2, 2015 10:27 am | by Karen Feldscher, Harvard Gazette | News | Comments

Research suggests anti-aging benefits of calorie restriction without the restriction...

A Gene for Brain Size - Only Found in Humans

March 2, 2015 9:56 am | by Max Planck Institute | News | Comments

Following the traces of evolution: researches find a key to the reproduction of brain stem cells...

New Target Identified in Fight Against Alzheimer's, Multiple Sclerosis

March 2, 2015 9:24 am | by Michael C. Purdy, Washington University in St. Louis | News | Comments

Highlighting a potential target in the treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS) and Alzheimer’s...

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Researchers Develop Method for Mapping Neuron Clusters

February 27, 2015 9:52 am | by NYU | News | Comments

A team of scientists has developed a method for identifying clusters of neurons that work in concert to guide the behavior.                       

Study Identifies Neurons That Help Predict What Individuals Will Do

February 27, 2015 9:25 am | by Massachusetts General Hospital | News | Comments

A study by Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) investigators has discovered two groups of neurons that play key roles in social interactions between primates – one that is activated when deciding whether to cooperate with another individual and another group involved in predicting what the other will do.

Scientists Discover Beliefs Can be as Powerful as Nicotine

February 26, 2015 10:32 am | by Ashley WennersHerron, Virginia Tech | News | Comments

Study participants inhaled nicotine, yet they showed significantly different brain activity.                            

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New Molecule Could Slow Progression of Parkinson's

February 26, 2015 10:22 am | by University of Bath | News | Comments

Researchers have designed a molecule that, if developed into a drug, could slow the progression of Parkinson's Disease.                       

A New Understanding of Alzheimer's

February 26, 2015 9:46 am | by Peter Reuell, Harvard Gazette | News | Comments

Findings point to role of natural selection in disease.                                  

Researchers Redefine Role of Brain's 'Hunger Circuit'

February 25, 2015 9:54 am | by Pete Farley, UCSF | News | Comments

Unexpected findings have implications for anti-obesity therapies.                                

How Brain Waves Guide Memory Formation

February 25, 2015 9:42 am | by Anne Trafton, MIT | News | Comments

Neurons hum at different frequencies to tell the brain which memories it should store.                             

Skin Test May Shed New Light on Alzheimer's, Parkinson's Diseases

February 25, 2015 9:32 am | by American Adcademy of Neurology | News | Comments

The study showed that skin biopsies can be used to detect elevated levels of abnormal proteins found in the two diseases.                       

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New ALS Gene and Signaling Pathways Identified

February 20, 2015 4:37 pm | News | Comments

Using advanced DNA sequencing methods, researchers have identified a new gene that is associated with sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), or Lou Gehrig’s disease.                       

Disruption in Brain Signals Shed New Light on Melancholic Depression

February 19, 2015 11:54 am | by University of New South Wales | News | Comments

Researchers have identified a distinctive brain signature in people with melancholic depression, supporting calls for its classification as a unique mood disorder type.               

How Right Hemisphere Assists Left When Damaged in Stroke

February 18, 2015 12:46 pm | by George Washington Univ. | News | Comments

A new study conducted by a researcher at the George Washington University suggests that the right hemisphere of the brain may be able to assist a damaged left hemisphere in protecting visual attention after a stroke.

Amyloid Formation May Link Alzheimer's, Type 2 Diabetes

February 18, 2015 12:28 pm | by Elsevier Health Sciences | News | Comments

The pathological process amyloidosis, in which misfolded proteins (amyloids) form insoluble fibril deposits, occurs in many diseases, including Alzheimer disease (AD) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D). 

Tadpole Model Links Drug Exposure to Autism-Like Effects

February 18, 2015 11:51 am | News | Comments

Research suggests that fetal exposure to chemicals or drugs can cause neurological problems. Babies whose mothers take the epilepsy drug valporic acid (VPA) during pregnancy, for example, appear to have an elevated risk of developing an autism spectrum disorder.

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Broca's Area is the Brain's Scriptwriter, Shaping Speech

February 17, 2015 4:27 pm | by Johns Hopkins University | News | Comments

This new insight about Broca’s area, which is located in the frontal cortex above and behind the left eye, could ultimately benefit the treatment of language impairments due to stroke, epilepsy and brain injuries.        

Iron May be a Factor in Dementia

February 17, 2015 4:09 pm | by Leigh Dayton, UTS | News | Comments

There is no way to spot Alzheimer's early, no effective treatment and no known cure.                             

How Technology Can Block Our Creativity

February 17, 2015 2:21 pm | by Ryan Bushey, Associate Editor | Videos | Comments

The Atlantic's James Hamblin explores how our obsession with smartphones could stifle creative impulses.                              

Molecular Inhibitor Breaks Cycle That Leads to Alzheimer's

February 17, 2015 10:15 am | by University of Cambridge | News | Comments

A molecule that can block the progress of Alzheimer’s disease at a crucial stage in its development has been identified by researchers in a new study, raising the prospect that more such molecules may now be found.        

Gambling, Obsessive Compulsive Behaviors Linked

February 13, 2015 3:49 pm | by Bill Hathaway, Yale University | News | Comments

Problem gambling and obsessive-compulsive behaviors share genetic as well as behavioral links, according to a new study.                       

Apes Prefer the Glass Half Full

February 12, 2015 2:27 pm | by Duke University | News | Comments

Humans aren’t the only species to be influenced by spin. Our closest primate relatives are susceptible, too.                         

Brain Stents Show Big Promise for Certain Stroke Patients

February 12, 2015 9:53 am | by Associated Press | News | Comments

Stroke experts are reporting a major advance: Stents similar to the ones used to open clogged heart arteries also can be used to clear a blood clot in the brain, greatly lowering the risk a patient will end up disabled.

Serotonin-Deficient Brains More Vulnerable to Social Stress

February 10, 2015 5:17 pm | by Duke University | News | Comments

Mice genetically deficient in serotonin—a crucial brain chemical implicated in clinical depression—are more vulnerable than their normal littermates to social stressors, according to a Duke study appearing this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Grey Matter Loss from Smoking May be Reversible: Study

February 10, 2015 5:12 pm | News | Comments

Damage to the brain's outer layer caused by smoking may be reversible after quitting, but it could take years, a study said. Brain scans of 500 Scottish septuagenarians confirmed a link between smoking and an acceleration of age-related thinning of the cortex—the outer layer of grey matter, researchers reported.

Serotonin-Deficient Brains More Vulnerable to Social Stress

February 10, 2015 9:23 am | by Duke University | News | Comments

Mice genetically deficient in serotonin -- a crucial brain chemical implicated in clinical depression -- are more vulnerable than their normal littermates to social stressors.              

Impact of Obesity on Fertility Can be Reversed

February 10, 2015 8:56 am | by University of Adelaide | News | Comments

Researchers have revealed how damage from obesity is passed from a mother to her children, and also how that damage can be reversed.                      

Tests Show NFL Brain Damage May Linger, Start Young

February 9, 2015 2:42 pm | by Cynthia Fox, Science Writer | Articles | Comments

After the highly charged Super Bowl, two sobering studies emerged. One unveiled an improved molecular imaging technology that verified—and precisely identified—brain damage in some National Football League (NFL) players. The other study revealed that brain damage can be more severe in NFL players who start playing football before age 12.

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