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Proteins May Slow Memory Loss in People With Alzheimer’s

May 22, 2015 10:04 am | by Iowa State University | News | Comments

Certain proteins may slow the devastating memory loss caused by Alzheimer’s disease, according to a study.

Seeking Deeper Understanding of How the Brain Works

May 22, 2015 9:17 am | by MIT | News | Comments

Edward Boyden develops techniques to study the brain, and how it operates, in finer detail.

Researchers Identify Potentially Effective Treatment for Methamphetamine Addiction

May 20, 2015 10:07 am | by UCLA | News | Comments

A new study has found that Naltrexone, a drug used to treat alcoholism, may also be a promising...

Neuroscientists ID Part of Brain Devoted to Processing Speech

May 19, 2015 9:49 am | by New York University | News | Comments

A team of  neuroscientists has identified a part of the brain exclusively devoted to processing...

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Drug Perks Up Old Muscles and Aging Brains

May 18, 2015 9:39 am | by University of California Berkeley | News | Comments

Whether you’re brainy, brawny or both, you may someday benefit from a drug found to rejuvenate aging brain and muscle tissue.

Bioscience Bulletin

May 18, 2015 8:54 am | by Bevin Fletcher, Associate Editor | News | Comments

In case you missed any exciting news on Bioscience Technology last week, here is a round-up of the top five most popular stories.

Long-Term Depression May Double Stroke Risk for Middle-Aged Adults

May 15, 2015 10:30 am | by University of California San Francisco | News | Comments

Adults over 50 who have persistent symptoms of depression may have twice the risk of stroke as those who do not, according to a new study led by researchers at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and UC San Francisco. Researchers found that stroke risk remains higher even after symptoms of depression go away, particularly for women.

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Researchers Solve Multiple Sclerosis Puzzle

May 15, 2015 9:09 am | by Yale University | News | Comments

Evidence has long suggested multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disease, but researchers have been puzzled because they found the same T cells that attack the myelin sheathing around nerve cells in MS patients are present in healthy subjects as well.

New Device May Allow Sensations in Prosthetic Hands

May 15, 2015 9:07 am | by University of Washington in St. Louis | News | Comments

To the nearly 2 million people in the United States living with the loss of a limb, including U.S. military veterans, prosthetic devices provide restored mobility, yet lack sensory feedback. A team of engineers and researchers at Washington University in St. Louis is working to change that so those with upper limb prosthetics can feel hot and cold and the sense of touch through their prosthetic hands.  

Brains of Smokers Who Quit Successfully Might be Wired for Success

May 14, 2015 9:33 am | by Duke University | News | Comments

Smokers who are able to quit might actually be hard-wired for success, according to a study from Duke Medicine.

Researchers Create Microscope Allowing Deep Brain Exploration

May 13, 2015 9:58 am | by University of Colorado Denver | News | Comments

 A team of neuroscientists and bioengineers have created a miniature, fiber-optic microscope designed to peer deeply inside a living brain.

Brain Cells Capable of "Early-career" Switch

May 13, 2015 9:27 am | by Salk Institute for Biological Studies | News | Comments

Scientists find a single molecule that controls the fate of mature sensory neurons.

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An Important Step in Artificial Intelligence

May 12, 2015 10:27 am | by University of California - Santa Barbara | News | Comments

Researchers are seeking to make computer brains smarter by making them more like our own.

Scientists Link Brain Protein to Binge-Drinking Behavior

May 12, 2015 10:11 am | by The Scripps Research Institute | News | Comments

Scientists have discovered that a brain protein has a key role in controlling binge drinking in animal models. They found that deleting the gene for this protein in mice ramped up alcohol consumption and prevented the brain from signaling the rewarding properties of alcohol. 

How Does Adderall Work?

May 12, 2015 9:45 am | by American Chemical Society | Videos | Comments

More than 25 million people rely on Adderall and other similar drugs to help treat narcolepsy, depression and attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). But how does amphetamine, the active ingredient in Adderall, work? This week, Reactions from the American Chemical Society explains how amphetamine helps you focus.

Researchers Discover How Cocaine, Amphetamines Disrupt the Brain’s Normal Functioning

May 12, 2015 9:36 am | by Oregon Health & Science University | News | Comments

Research sheds light on how addictive drugs interfere with the dopamine transporter, expected to usher in long-sought advances in treatments

The BioDigital Human: Exploring Health in 3D

May 12, 2015 8:39 am | by Bevin Fletcher, Associate Editor | Articles | Comments

It has been hailed as the equivalent of Google Maps for the human body by The New York Times, and now the award-winning mobile-friendly platform BioDigital Human is looking to change the way healthcare information is shared, consumed and understood.

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Plugging In Your Vision's Autostabilization Feature

May 11, 2015 10:38 am | by Johns Hopkins | News | Comments

New study reveals how important neurons find their way from the retina to the inner brain.

Epilepsy Drug Could Help Treat Alzheimer's Disease

May 11, 2015 10:30 am | by University of British Columbia | News | Comments

Researchers say a new epilepsy drug holds promise as a treatment for Alzheimer's disease.

Seeing Gender

May 11, 2015 10:21 am | by Rob Matheson, MIT | News | Comments

Neuroscientists pinpoint neurons that help primates tell faces apart.

Bioscience Bulletin

May 11, 2015 9:38 am | by Bevin Fletcher, Associate Editor | Articles | Comments

In case you missed any exciting news on Bioscience Technology last week, here is a round-up of the top five most popular stories.

Enhanced Analysis of Extracellular Vesicles with Imaging Flow Cytometry

May 8, 2015 10:11 am | by Sherree Friend, Ph.D. Product Manager, Amnis, and Robin Clark, Content Development Scientist, EMD Millipore | Articles | Comments

The translation of extracellular vesicle research to the clinic to aid in the diagnosis and treatment of many disease types will require the development of standard assays for their characterization and quantification. The challenge of such analysis lies in the submicron size (generally 50-1000 nm in diameter) of each vesicle, as well as the complexity of the biofluids in which they are typically suspended.

Genes Influence How Your Brain Reacts to Emotional Information

May 7, 2015 11:05 am | by University of British Columbia | News | Comments

Your genes may influence how sensitive you are to emotional information, according to new research. The study, recently published in The Journal of Neuroscience, found that carriers of a certain genetic variation perceived positive and negative images more vividly, and had heightened activity in certain brain regions.

Study Reveals Link Between Protein, Sleep Cycle

May 7, 2015 9:06 am | by Joe Shust, Editor, Continuity Insights | Articles | Comments

An international team of scientists, led by researchers at McGill and Concordia Universities in Montreal, discovered what could become a way for humans to re-set their ‘biological clock’ without light.  This could lead to breakthroughs in treating a wide range of issues, from sleeping disorders to jetlag.

Alzheimer’s Disease Treatment Market Value Will Exceed $13 Billion

May 7, 2015 8:54 am | by Kyle S. Nicholson, PharmD, GlobalData Neurology Analyst | Articles | Comments

Disease-modifying treatments and novel symptomatic therapies with innovative mechanisms of action will enter the arena during the forecast period and become routinely used in care.

Electric Brain Stimulation Has Mixed Effect on IQ

May 7, 2015 8:54 am | by Ryan Bushey, Associate Editor | Articles | Comments

The goal of the study was to see how transcranial direct current stimulation affected IQ scores. 

Green Tea Extract and Exercise Hinder Progress of Alzheimer’s Disease in Mice

May 6, 2015 10:51 am | by University of Missouri | News | Comments

Comprehensive study of EGCG, a compound found in green tea, could lead to treatments of Alzheimer’s in humans.

Research Finds “Fuzzy Thinking” Effect in Depression, Bipolar Disorder is Real

May 6, 2015 9:50 am | by University of Michigan | News | Comments

 Very large study adds to evidence that mood disorders are points on a spectrum, not completely separate – and could lead to better diagnostic tests.

Scientists Reconcile Three Unrelated Theories of Schizophrenia

May 6, 2015 9:24 am | by Duke University | News | Comments

Mouse model will help scientists parse brain-based findings.

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