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Bioscience Technology This Week #8: Safe Nuts for Allergy Sufferers

August 15, 2014 12:43 pm | Comments

On this episode of Bioscience Technology This Week, Christina Jakubowski reports on the possibility of making nuts safer to eat for those with allergies. Our second story tackles important questions about which genes may drive antibiotic resistance. 

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Lasers Can Control Mouse Brain Switchboard

August 15, 2014 12:31 pm | Comments

Ever wonder why it’s hard to focus after a bad night’s sleep? Using mice and flashes of light, scientists show that just a few nerve cells in the brain may control the switch between internal thoughts and external distractions.         

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Bioscience Technology This Week #7: Fruit Flies Unlock the Mysteries of Diabetes

August 13, 2014 2:20 pm | Comments

In this episode of Bioscience Technology This Week, Rob Fee discusses how studying fruit flies could revolutionize diabetes research. Our second story focuses on how venom could form the basis of a new class of cancerfighting drugs.    

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Prostate Cancer Diagnosis Improves with MRI Technology

August 13, 2014 11:03 am | Comments

Oncologists are melding magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technology with a traditional ultrasound prostate exam to create a three-dimensional map of the prostate that allows physicians to view growths that were previously undetectable.      

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Size Matters When Convincing Brain to Eat Healthy Foods

August 12, 2014 12:05 pm | Comments

Playing with the portions of good and not-so-good-for-you foods is better than trying to eliminate bad foods, according to a new study. The idea is to not give up entirely foods that provide pleasure but aren’t nutritious.         

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Bioscience Technology This Week #6: What Can Bears Teach Us About Diabetes?

August 8, 2014 1:48 pm | Comments

In this episode of Bioscience Technology This Week, Rob Fee reports on the findings that researchers studying diabetes learned by observing grizzly bears. He also discusses a stem cell therapy that could lead to new and effective spinal cord injury treatments.

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Bioscience Technology This Week #5: Protein Hub Crucial to Brain Development

August 6, 2014 2:27 pm | Comments

In this episode of Bioscience Technology This Week, News Editor Christina Jakubowski highlights the role of the protein GSK-3 in brain development and also reports that running, regardless of duration or speed, reduces death risk.      

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Researchers Boost Insect Aggression by Altering Brain Metabolism

August 6, 2014 1:36 pm | Comments

Scientists report they can crank up insect aggression simply by interfering with a basic metabolic pathway in the insect brain. Their study, of fruit flies and honey bees, shows a direct, causal link between brain metabolism (how the brain generates the energy it needs to function) and aggression.

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New Way to Generate Insulin-producing Cells in Diabetes

July 31, 2014 3:20 pm | Comments

A new study has found that a peptide called caerulein can convert existing cells in the pancreas into those cells destroyed in type 1 diabetes-insulin-producing beta cells.                       

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Bioscience Technology This Week #4: Gold Nanoparticles Show Promise for Drug Delivery

July 30, 2014 2:02 pm | Comments

On this episode of Bioscience Technology This Week, Editor-in-Chief Rob Fee reports on gold nanoparticles' promise in drug delivery. Our second story examines the work being done to decipher the wheat genome and the implications of this work.

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Retinal Regeneration in Zebrafish

July 30, 2014 12:27 pm | Comments

Biologists are studying retinal regeneration in zebrafish to find ways to combat human eye diseases. The small, minnow-like fish have eyes that develop in a way very similar to humans, but have the ability to regenerate retinal cells following an injury.

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Memory Relies on Astrocytes

July 29, 2014 11:46 am | Comments

When you're expecting something— like the meal you've ordered at a restaurant— or when or when something captures your interest, unique electrical rhythms called gamma oscillations sweep through your brain. New research shows that little known supportive cells in the brain known as astrocytes may in fact be major players that control these waves.

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Implantable Sensors Improve Control for Prosthetic Limbs

July 25, 2014 1:52 pm | Comments

When a muscles contracts it generates electricity. This electrical activity remains in the muscles of an amputated limb. It has long been a goal to use these natural muscle signals to enhance the control of hand and arm prosthetics. Previously, researchers did this by attaching two external sensors to the surface of the skin of the residual limb. The sensors were connected to a prosthesis controller by wires.

Background TV Can be Bad for Kids

July 24, 2014 1:24 pm | Comments

Parents, turn off the television when your children are with you. And when you do let them watch, make sure the programs stimulate their interest in learning. At least, that's the advice arising from researchers who examined the impact of television and parenting on children’s social and emotional development.

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Bioscience Technology This Week #3: Sense of Smell Linked to Alzheimer's Disease

July 23, 2014 10:50 am | Comments

On this episode of Bioscience Technology This Week, Editor-in-Chief Rob Fee reports on research claiming that the sense of smell is linked to Alzheimer's Disease development. Our second story examines a new process that could aid cells in gobbling up undesirable neighbors.

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