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BST This Week #9: Can Sweat Power Your Smartphone?

August 20, 2014 2:48 pm | Videos | Comments

On this episode of Bioscience Technology This Week, Christina Jakubowski highlights the possibility of using small sensors as biobatteries that can harvest power from sweat. Our second story covers a newly discovered plant “language."     

Multi-purpose Freeze Dry System

August 20, 2014 1:02 pm | Product Releases | Comments

The FreeZone Triad Benchtop Stoppering Tray Dryer and Lyophilizer from Labconco has four valves...

Are Failing Bees a Warning Sign to Human Health?

August 20, 2014 12:14 pm | News | Comments

A researcher believes that the potential human health implications of bee colony collapse...

Brain Size Linked to Parental Duties in Fish

August 20, 2014 12:06 pm | News | Comments

Male stickleback fish that protect their young have bigger brains than counterparts - male white...

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Serial Dilution in 96-, 384-well Microplates

August 19, 2014 2:00 pm | Product Releases | Comments

Integra’s Row Dilution Plate Holder accessory for the VIAFLO 96 and 384 handheld benchtop pipettes adds the functionality to perform serial dilutions in rows. Serial dilutions are often carried out in row format because it allows experimenters to dilute more samples.

Physical Fitness Makes Kids' Brains Bigger

August 19, 2014 1:41 pm | News | Comments

A new study of 9- and 10-year-olds finds that those who are more aerobically fit have more fibrous and compact white-matter tracts in the brain than their peers who are less fit.                     

Engineering New Bone Growth

August 19, 2014 12:07 pm | News | Comments

Chemical engineers have devised a new implantable tissue scaffold coated with bone growth factors that are released slowly over a few weeks. When applied to bone injuries or defects, the scaffold induces the body to rapidly form new bone that looks and behaves just like the original tissue.

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Breakthrough in the Fight Against Drug-resistant Superbugs

August 19, 2014 11:51 am | News | Comments

Scientists have made a breakthrough in the fight against the most resistant hospital superbugs by developing the first innovative antibacterial gel that acts to kill Pseudomonas aeruginosa, staphylococci and E. coli, using natural proteins.     

Critical Wound-healing Proteins Identified

August 19, 2014 11:13 am | News | Comments

Mice missing two important proteins of the vascular system develop normally and appear healthy in adulthood, as long as they don’t become injured. If they do, their wounds don’t heal properly, a new study shows.           

Next-Generation Sequencing and the Transformation of Cancer Care

August 18, 2014 3:20 pm | by Darren Lee, Vice President, Marketing & Business Development, Nabsys | White Papers

NGS is revolutionizing the field of genome biology, with much faster data generation, increased accuracy, and a dramatic reduction of sequencing costs. Multiple genomes can now be sequenced in parallel by a single instrument in a matter of days. In the medical field, NGS is already having an impact in genetic screening and holds great potential in oncology, given the genetic aspects of cancerous disease.

High-Vacuum Benchtop Solvent Evaporator

August 18, 2014 1:28 pm | Product Releases | Comments

Genevac's EZ-2 Elite Centrifugal Evaporator has been designed to provide unmatched final drying of stubborn samples and fast lyophilisation of HPLC fractions.

Bioscience Technology This Week #8: Safe Nuts for Allergy Sufferers

August 15, 2014 12:43 pm | Videos | Comments

On this episode of Bioscience Technology This Week, Christina Jakubowski reports on the possibility of making nuts safer to eat for those with allergies. Our second story tackles important questions about which genes may drive antibiotic resistance. 

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CDC Scientist Kept Quiet About Flu Blunder

August 15, 2014 12:21 pm | by Mike Stobbe - AP Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

An investigation into a potentially dangerous blunder at a government lab found that a scientist kept silent about the accident and revealed it only after other employees noticed something fishy.               

Bats Bolster Brain Hypothesis, Maybe Technology, Too

August 15, 2014 11:11 am | News | Comments

Decades of research on how bats use echolocation to keep a focus on their targets not only lends support to a long debated neuroscience hypothesis about vision but, according to researchers at Brown University, also could lead to smarter sonar and radar technologies.

Single Enzyme is Necessary for Development of Diabetes

August 15, 2014 11:04 am | News | Comments

An enzyme called 12-LO promotes the obesity-induced oxidative stress in the pancreatic cells that leads to pre-diabetes, and diabetes. 12-LO’s enzymatic action is the last step in the production of certain small molecules that harm the cell, according to a team from Indiana University School of Medicine. The findings will enable the development of drugs that can interfere with this enzyme, preventing or even reversing diabetes.

Autism, SPD Hit Different Brain Areas

August 14, 2014 11:10 am | by Cynthia Fox | Articles | Comments

Children with sensory processing disorder (SPD) have decreased white matter brain connections in sensory regions very different from those with autism, say researchers. Their study is the first to compare, and find critical differences in, brain connectivity in autism versus SPD versus controls.

Bioscience Technology This Week #7: Fruit Flies Unlock the Mysteries of Diabetes

August 13, 2014 2:20 pm | Videos | Comments

In this episode of Bioscience Technology This Week, Rob Fee discusses how studying fruit flies could revolutionize diabetes research. Our second story focuses on how venom could form the basis of a new class of cancerfighting drugs.    

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Scientists Pinpoint Gene Likely to Promote Childhood Cancers

August 12, 2014 2:28 pm | News | Comments

Researchers at the Children’s Medical Center Research Institute at UT Southwestern (CRI) have identified a gene that contributes to the development of several childhood cancers, in a study conducted with mice designed to model the cancers. If the findings prove to be applicable to humans, the research could lead to new strategies for targeting certain childhood cancers at a molecular level.

Synthetic Molecule Makes Cancer Self-Destruct

August 12, 2014 2:21 pm | News | Comments

Researchers from The University of Texas at Austin and five other institutions have created a molecule that can cause cancer cells to self-destruct by ferrying sodium and chloride ions into the cancer cells. These synthetic ion transporters confirm a two-decades-old hypothesis that could point the way to new anticancer drugs while also benefiting patients with cystic fibrosis.

An Easier Way to Manipulate Malaria Genes

August 12, 2014 2:06 pm | News | Comments

Plasmodium falciparum, the parasite that causes malaria, has proven notoriously resistant to scientists’ efforts to study its genetics. It can take up to a year to determine the function of a single gene, which has slowed efforts to develop new, more targeted drugs and vaccines.

Hijacking the Brain's Blood Supply: Tumor Discovery Could Aid Treatment

August 12, 2014 1:55 pm | News | Comments

Dangerous brain tumors hijack the brain’s existing blood supply throughout their progression, by growing only within narrow potential spaces between and along the brain’s thousands of small blood vessels, new research shows for the first time.

Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis: Hope, At Last

August 11, 2014 2:26 pm | by Cynthia Fox | Articles | Comments

There have been stunning “firsts” in research on idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), a mysterious disease that stiffens and stills the lungs, killing half its victims in three years. In May, results of Phase 3 clinical trials on the first two effective drugs for IPF were published in the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM). And in June, the first paper explaining IPF was published in Science Translational Medicine.

Editing HPV's Genes to Kill Cervical Cancer Cells

August 11, 2014 2:13 pm | News | Comments

Researchers have hijacked a defense system normally used by bacteria to fend off viral infections and redirected it against the human papillomavirus (HPV), the virus that causes cervical, head and neck, and other cancers.Using the genome editing tool known as CRISPR, the Duke University researchers were able to selectively destroy two viral genes responsible for the growth and survival of cervical carcinoma cells.

Scientists Unlock Key to Blood Vessel Formation

August 11, 2014 2:09 pm | News | Comments

Scientists from the University of Leeds have discovered a gene that plays a vital role in blood vessel formation, research which adds to our knowledge of how early life develops. The discovery could also lead to greater understanding of how to treat cardiovascular diseases and cancer.

Like Cling Wrap, New Biomaterial Can Coat Burn Wounds and Block Infection

August 11, 2014 2:01 pm | News | Comments

Wrapping wound dressings around fingers and toes can be tricky, but for burn victims, guarding them against infection is critical. Today, scientists are reporting the development of novel, ultrathin coatings called nanosheets that can cling to the body’s most difficult-to-protect contours and keep bacteria at bay.

Solving a Sticky Problem with Fetal Surgery Using Glue Inspired by Sandcastle Worm

August 11, 2014 1:48 pm | News | Comments

In creating an adhesive patterned after glue produced by the lowly underwater sandcastle worm, researchers are reporting today that they may have solved the problem of premature births that sometimes result from fetal surgery. It also could open up numerous opportunities to safely perform more complex fetal surgeries in the future.

Making Cashews Safer for Those with Allergies

August 11, 2014 1:37 pm | News | Comments

For the millions of adults and children in the U.S. who have to shun nuts to avoid an allergic reaction, help could be on the way. Scientists are now developing a method to process cashews—and potentially other nuts—that could make them safer to eat for people who are allergic to them.

Bioscience Technology This Week #6: What Can Bears Teach Us About Diabetes?

August 8, 2014 1:48 pm | Videos | Comments

In this episode of Bioscience Technology This Week, Rob Fee reports on the findings that researchers studying diabetes learned by observing grizzly bears. He also discusses a stem cell therapy that could lead to new and effective spinal cord injury treatments.

Can People with Type 2 Diabetes Live Longer?

August 8, 2014 1:26 pm | News | Comments

A large-scale University-led study involving more than 180,000 people shows that patients treated with a drug widely prescribed for type 2 diabetes can live longer than people without the condition. The findings indicate that a drug known as metformin, used to control glucose levels in the body and already known to exhibit anticancer properties, could offer prognostic and prophylactic benefits to people without diabetes.

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