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Newly-Found T Memory Stem Cells May Be Key to Gene Therapy

February 27, 2015 10:41 am | by Cynthia Fox, Science Writer | Articles | Comments

Genetically engineered T memory stem cells (Tscm) can last more than 12 years in patients’ bodies, and can continually generate appropriate T cell armies for them, says an innovative study looking at two historic clinical trials.     

Academic Leaders on the Troubled Future of Biomedical Research

February 27, 2015 9:40 am | by Karl Bates, Duke University | News | Comments

Discussion targets changing financial environment for biomedical research.

Software Suite for Raman, AFM, SNOM

February 26, 2015 10:35 am | Product Releases | Comments

The new WITec Suite software is now available for all WITec imaging systems. It was specifically...

Telemedicine Set to Bloom in 2015

February 24, 2015 1:39 pm | by Steve Boccone, Greybox Communications | Articles | Comments

New technologies will help the field of telemedicine drastically grow this year...

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Mass Spec Imaging Services

February 24, 2015 9:59 am | Product Releases | Comments

The Ion Mobility Software from Protea Biosciences Group is now available on a Waters Synapt G2S High Definition mass spectrometer as a powerful extension to Protea’s portfolio of mass-spectrometry-based molecular imaging services.

The Evolution of Birth Control

February 20, 2015 4:46 pm | by Ryan Bushey, Associate Editor | Videos | Comments

The Atlantic’s Olga Khazan wrote a new feature for the magazine examining the future of contraception.                                     

Remote Access Blot and Gel Imager

February 20, 2015 3:57 pm | Product Releases | Comments

The T:Genius imaging system from Syngene allows high performance, walk-away imaging of gels and blots on a smartphone or tablet.

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The Latest Anti-Science War: Christians Against Dinosaurs

February 18, 2015 3:57 pm | by Cynthia Fox, Science Writer | Blogs | Comments

All day last Friday, a cyber-war waged over, essentially, books: textbooks versus The Good Book; Peer Review vs. the Psalms, etc. Starting at 9 a.m. EST that day, on Reddit (the famous entertainment and news social networking website), a ‘Redditor’ posted a quote from Mumsnet (a parenting website), by a member of the Facebook group “Christians Against Dinosaurs (CAD)” who called herself “CADministry."

Is Strenuous Running Really as Bad for Health as Lounging?

February 18, 2015 11:32 am | by Cynthia Fox, Science Writer | News | Comments

Running hard may be as bad for your longevity as being a couch potato, says a recent study—one that should be taken with a grain of salt (hold the butter), say some critics. The study, in a recent Journal of the American College of Cardiology, examined 5,048 healthy people enrolled in the Copenhagen City Heart Study. For 12 years, 1,098 healthy joggers and 413 healthy, but sedentary non-joggers were followed.

How Technology Can Block Our Creativity

February 17, 2015 2:21 pm | by Ryan Bushey, Associate Editor | Videos | Comments

The Atlantic's James Hamblin explores how our obsession with smartphones could stifle creative impulses.                              

Tickling Rats Reduces Stress of Injections

February 17, 2015 10:44 am | by Elizabeth Doughman, Editor-in-Chief, ALN Magazine | Articles | Comments

A new study, published in Applied Animal Behaviour Science, found that rats shows less stress when tickled before given an injection. This finding could help refine laboratory animal care standards and improve the quality and validity of data collected from animals used in biomedical research.

Researchers Test Device to Help Deaf Children Detect Sounds

February 17, 2015 10:28 am | by Lauran Neergaard, AP Medical Writer | News | Comments

The device goes beyond cochlear implants that have brought hearing to many deaf children but that don't work for tots who lack their hearing nerve.                   

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Ebola Victims Infectious for a Week After Death, Nonhuman Primate Study Finds

February 13, 2015 4:32 pm | by Elizabeth Doughman, Editor-in-Chief, ALN Magazine | News | Comments

The Ebola virus remains viable for at least seven days after death in non-human primates. A new study, published in Emerging Infectious Diseases, suggests that Ebola transmission from deceased individuals may be possible for an extended period of time after death, underscoring the importance of using safe practices for handling corpses.  

Measuring Extracellular Vesicle Stability: A New Frontier in Analytical Technology

February 12, 2015 2:14 pm | by Pauline Carnell, Product Manager – NanoSight, Malvern Instruments Ltd. & Agnieszka Siupa, Application Scientist, Malvern Instruments Ltd. | Articles | Comments

The study of extracellular vesicles is an area that has recently become the subject of intense interest. These vesicles are apparently ubiquitous in prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms and it is believed they have a wide role to play in many physiological and pathological processes. 

Storage System with Evaporators Above Samples

February 12, 2015 1:46 pm | Product Releases | Comments

Brooks BioStore II has fully redundant refrigeration circuits that provide reliability as well as additional cooling capacity under unusual heat load conditions. The system may also use liquid nitrogen as a backup refrigerant in case of power failure.

Smartphone Apps Just as Accurate as Wearable Devices: Study

February 12, 2015 10:04 am | News | Comments

Although wearable devices have received significant attention for their ability to track an individual’s physical activity, most smartphone applications are just as accurate, according to a new research letter in JAMA.              

Startup Uses Google Glass to Improve Patient-Physician Relationship

February 10, 2015 9:28 am | by Tracie White, Stanford Medical School | News | Comments

Firsthand experience working in hospitals and clinics helped inspire third-year Stanford medical student Pelu Tran to explore a potential career path in the world of high-tech startups.             

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Senate Approves Ex-Mass Official as U.S. Drug Czar

February 10, 2015 9:00 am | by Matthew Daly - Associated Press | News | Comments

President Barack Obama's nominee to serve as U.S. drug "czar" won unanimous approval in the Senate Monday as lawmakers vowed to curb an epidemic that results in more than 40,000 deaths a year from overdoses of prescription painkillers, heroin and other substances.

Tests Show NFL Brain Damage May Linger, Start Young

February 9, 2015 2:42 pm | by Cynthia Fox, Science Writer | Articles | Comments

After the highly charged Super Bowl, two sobering studies emerged. One unveiled an improved molecular imaging technology that verified—and precisely identified—brain damage in some National Football League (NFL) players. The other study revealed that brain damage can be more severe in NFL players who start playing football before age 12.

Next-Gen Sequencing Maps 'Highly Degraded' DNA

February 6, 2015 12:46 pm | by Sean Alloca, Editor, Forensic Magazine | Articles | Comments

Next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology can now profile highly damaged DNA samples that contain 75 percent less base-pair information, compared with previous systems. This is a significant improvement for law enforcement in cases involving missing persons or unidentified human remains.

Revolution in Imaging Tech Brings Heart Failure Molecule Into View

February 4, 2015 10:32 am | by Columbia University | News | Comments

Using the same technology that made smartphone cameras possible, scientists at Columbia University Medical Center are capturing images of individual molecules at a level of detail never before possible—including images of a molecule implicated in heart disease and muscle diseases.

Beethoven’s Arrhythmias Likely Inspired Some of His Masterpieces

February 3, 2015 1:54 pm | by Cynthia Fox, Science Writer | Articles | Comments

"Washington University cardiologist Zachary Goldberger once made music out of heartbeats. Now, with a Beethoven scholar and a medical historian, he has discovered that three musical compositions that Beethoven created while stressed are arrhythmic in a way mirroring the composer's own probable heart arrhythmias."

President Obama Reveals Details About Precision Medicine Project

February 1, 2015 6:45 pm | by Ryan Bushey, Associate Editor | Videos | Comments

President Obama held a press conference revealing new details surrounding the Precision Medicine initiative he announced during the State of The Union.                               

Inside Google's Secretive Life Sciences Lab

January 29, 2015 4:11 pm | by Ryan Bushey, Associate Editor | Videos | Comments

This is the first official look at the life sciences division of Google X.                               

Novel Eye-Tracking Technology Detects Concussions and Head Injury Severity

January 29, 2015 2:49 pm | by NYU Langone | News | Comments

This research could move the medical community one step closer toward effectively detecting concussion and quantifying its severity.                      

Women Less Welcome Than Men in Fields Demanding Brilliance

January 28, 2015 4:25 pm | by Cynthia Fox, Science Writer | Articles | Comments

Women are less welcome than men in fields—including philosophy, physics, math, and music composition—where brilliance is viewed as more important than effort, says a co-ed Princeton University/University of Illinois group in a recent Science.

Researchers Design Tailored Tissue Adhesives

January 28, 2015 2:47 pm | by Anne Trafton, MIT | News | Comments

After undergoing surgery to remove diseased sections of the colon, up to 30 percent of patients experience leakage from their sutures, which can cause life-threatening complications.             

Harvard's Odyssey Unlocks Big Data

January 28, 2015 2:40 pm | by Harvard Gazette | News | Comments

As technology evolves and becomes further integrated into society, massive amounts of data are being collected and stored.                       

Incubators for Demanding Cell Culture Applications

January 26, 2015 9:57 am | Product Releases | Comments

The Thermo Scientific Heracell VIOS incubator series is ideal for academic research and pharmaceutical applications, allowing scientists to maximize their productivity with excellent reproducibility, reliability and efficiency.

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