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Cloning Making a Comeback?

April 18, 2014 1:46 pm | by Cynthia Fox | Articles | Comments

Cloning has finally generated immunologically compatible embryonic stem cells for older humans: two men aged 35 and 75. It may also generate significantly fewer tumor-causing mutations than the popular induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) method of making ES cells.

Deadly Human Pathogen Cryptococcus Fully Sequenced

April 18, 2014 12:36 pm | News | Comments

Researchers have sequenced the entire genome and all the RNA products of the most important...

Lost Stem Cells Naturally Replaced by Non-stem Cells

April 18, 2014 11:58 am | News | Comments

Researchers have discovered an unexpected phenomenon in the organs that produce sperm in fruit...

Breaking News: Marijuana Use Linked to Brain Abnormalities

April 16, 2014 8:30 am | News | Comments

Young adults who used marijuana only recreationally showed significant abnormalities in two...

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MS Syringe Filter Certified for Low LCMS Extractables in Small Samples

April 15, 2014 1:53 pm | Product Releases | Comments

Pall introduced a 13 mm Acrodisc MS syringe filter certified for low extractables in high performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LCMS) applications. The new 13 mm size, which is designed specifically for small sample analysis using LCMS, complements Pall’s current Acrodisc MS syringe filter offering of a 25 mm filter.

Young Dads at High Risk of Depression, Too

April 15, 2014 12:07 pm | News | Comments

Depression can hit young fathers hard- with symptoms increasing dramatically during some of the most important years of their children’s lives, a new study has found.                        

Have Easy-To-Use Cell Sorters Finally Arrived?

April 14, 2014 2:25 pm | by Robert Archer, Ph.D., Bio-Rad Laboratories | White Papers

Patience may be a virtue. But in a lab that’s bustling with scientists conducting meaningful biological research, excessive waiting can be downright frustrating. Such was the case leading up to 2012, when researchers at The University of Chicago Flow Cytometry Core Facility— known as UCFlow— would routinely wait as long as 16 days to be able to sort cells. 

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Breaking News: Coffee Intake Linked to Liver Cancer Risk

April 9, 2014 11:16 am | News | Comments

The more cups of coffee a person drank, the lower the risk for developing hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), the most common type of liver cancer, according to new research.                       

Movies Synchronize Brains of Different People

April 7, 2014 1:58 pm | News | Comments

Researchers have succeeded in developing a method fast enough to observe immediate changes in the function of the brain even when watching a movie. When we watch a movie, our brains react to it immediately in a way similar to other people's brains.

Scientists ID Key Cells in Touch Sensation

April 7, 2014 1:49 pm | Videos | Comments

In a new study, researchers solved an age-old mystery of touch: how cells just beneath the skin surface enable us to feel fine details and textures.                              

Energy Efficient Freezers with Heated Bypass Coil

April 2, 2014 2:45 pm | Nuaire, Inc. | Product Releases | Comments

NuAire’s Glacier -86 C Ultralow Temperature Freezers’ energy efficient cascade cooling system monitors temperature and pressures throughout high and low stage circuits. The inner chamber is surrounded by foam-in-place polyurethane insulation.

Scientist Said He May Have Made STAP Cells—Just As Riken Called Fraud

April 2, 2014 1:23 pm | by Cynthia Fox | Articles | Comments

Riken Institute brass want co-authors of the “acid bath” stem cell papers to retract one, after appeal, citing deliberate misconduct. But two developments may complicate this. First, lead author Haruko Obokata refuses to accept it. And Kenneth Lee has become the first scientist outside the co-authors to publicly claim that, following the latest protocol for acid bath cells, he may have made them.

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Storage System with Evaporators Above Samples

April 1, 2014 2:04 pm | Product Releases | Comments

Brooks BioStore II has fully redundant refrigeration circuits that provide reliability as well as additional cooling capacity under unusual heat load conditions. The system may also use liquid nitrogen as a backup refrigerant in case of power failure.

Breaking News: Growing Concerns Over STAP Cell Sources

March 27, 2014 10:25 am | by Cynthia Fox | Blogs | Comments

Cloning pioneer Teru Wakayama found two STAP stem cell batches made for recent Nature STAP papers were apparently not derived from a 129 mouse strain, as he was told, but F1 and B6 strains. While the erroneous data, which appeared in one of the papers, does not affect the works' main thrust, it is spurring calls for reviews of other STAP stem cell sources.

Nature Rejects Challenge to "Acid Stem Cells"; Scientists Try New Tips

March 24, 2014 9:51 am | by Cynthia Fox | Blogs | Comments

Nature has rejected the paper of a top Hong Kong researcher whose lab several times failed to replicate results of the now-famous “acid bath” stem cell papers. That researcher is now trying to reproduce the work as it appears in yet another new updated protocol, posted Thursday by Harvard researchers. Meanwhile, in interviews, Harvard's Vacanti clarifies some mysteries.

Archaeologists Discover the Earliest Complete Example of a Human with Cancer

March 18, 2014 2:10 pm | News | Comments

Archaeologists have found the oldest complete example in the world of a human with metastatic cancer in a 3,000 year-old skeleton. The skeleton of the young adult male was found by a Durham University PhD student in a tomb in modern Sudan in 2013 and dates back to 1200BC.

"Acid Bath" Stem Cell Developments Rapidly Accumulate

March 17, 2014 10:16 am | by Cynthia Fox | Blogs | Comments

Harvard's Charles Vacanti will post tips to make "acid bath" stem cells as early as today. This, even as "acid bath" lead author Haruko Obokata said she plans to withdraw her 2011 thesis. And four of 14 co-authors of "acid bath" papers—along with some coauthors’ boss— want them retracted. Yet that same boss signaled confidence in the papers' premise. “Almost too amazing,” says CIRM's recent chief.

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LC Columns Available in 30 Configurations

March 13, 2014 2:57 pm | Product Releases | Comments

CORTECS Columns from Waters Corporation are new 1.6 micron solid-core UltraPerformance LC Columns that set a new standard in LC column performance. The higher efficiency brought with the columns allows laboratories to produce greater amounts of information faster with every chromatographic separation.

NIH Opens Research Hospital to Outside Scientists

March 13, 2014 2:44 pm | News | Comments

Ten projects that will enable non-government researchers to conduct clinical research at the National Institutes of Health’s Clinical Center in Bethesda, Md. were announced. Through these three-year, renewable awards of up to $500,000 per year, scientists from institutions across the United States will collaborate with government scientists in a highly specialized hospital setting.

Breaking News: Forgetting is Actively Regulated

March 13, 2014 12:00 pm | News | Comments

Through memory loss, unnecessary information in the brain is deleted and the nervous system retains its plasticity. Previously, it was not clear if this process was active or passive, but scientists have now discovered a molecular mechanism that actively regulates the process of forgetting.

Cancer Stem Cell Camps

March 4, 2014 4:51 pm | by Cynthia Fox | Articles | Comments

At least two camps have formed in the “breast cancer stem cell” world. One camp believes most cancers may come from stem cells—or stem-like progenitors—gone awry. Others agree cancers can be most virulent when reaching a stem cell-like state—but believe they may come from both stem cells and mature cells gone awry.

Liver Metabolism Study Could Help Patients Awaiting Transplants

March 4, 2014 1:17 pm | News | Comments

In a new study that could help doctors extend the lives of patients awaiting liver transplants, a Rice University-led team of researchers examined the metabolic breakdown that takes place in liver cells during late-stage cirrhosis and found clues that suggest new treatments to delay liver failure.

Blasts May Cause Brain Injury Even Without Symptoms

March 4, 2014 12:16 pm | News | Comments

Veterans exposed to explosions who do not report symptoms of traumatic brain injury (TBI) may still have damage to the brain's white matter comparable to veterans with TBI, according to researchers at Duke Medicine and the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs. The findings suggest that a lack of clear TBI symptoms following an explosion may not accurately reflect the extent of brain injury.

Light Zaps Viruses: How Photosensitization Can Stop Viruses from Infecting Cells

March 4, 2014 11:55 am | News | Comments

A of researchers has found evidence that photosensitizing a virus's membrane covering can inhibit its ability to enter cells and potentially lead to the development of stronger, cheaper medications to fight a host of tough viruses. The UCLA AIDS Institute study is part of ongoing research on a compound called LJ001, a "broad-spectrum" antiviral that can attack a wide range of microbes.

Researchers Identify Brain Differences Linked to Insomnia

March 4, 2014 11:36 am | News | Comments

Johns Hopkins researchers report that people with chronic insomnia show more plasticity and activity than good sleepers in the part of the brain that controls movement. They found that the motor cortex in those with chronic insomnia was more adaptable to change - more plastic - than in a group of good sleepers. They also found more "excitability" among neurons in the same region of the brain among those with chronic insomnia.

Emergency Alert in the Cell

February 28, 2014 12:10 pm | News | Comments

When a cell is exposed to dangerous environmental conditions such as high temperatures or toxic substances, the cellular stress response, also called heat shock response, is initiated. Scientists could uncover an entire network of cellular helpers and thus identify new regulatory mechanisms of this stress response.

A Bird's Eye View of Cellular RNAs

February 28, 2014 11:57 am | Videos | Comments

In biology, as in real estate, location matters. Working copies of active genes—called messenger RNAs or mRNAs—are positioned strategically throughout living tissues, and their location often helps regulate how cells and tissues grow and develop. But to analyze many mRNAs simultaneously, scientists have had to grind cells to a pulp, which left them no good way to pinpoint where those mRNAs sat within the cell.

Breaking News: Do Obesity, Birth Control Pills Up MS Risk?

February 27, 2014 4:00 pm | News | Comments

In two new studies, the so-called “obesity hormone” leptin and hormones used for birth control are being examined for their potential role in the development of multiple sclerosis (MS).                   

3-D Printer Creates Transformative Device for Heart Treatment

February 26, 2014 2:14 pm | News | Comments

Using a 3-D printer, biomedical engineers have developed a custom-fitted, implantable device with embedded sensors that could transform treatment and prediction of cardiac disorders. An international team of biomedical engineers and materials scientists have created a 3-D elastic membrane made of a soft, flexible, silicon material that is precisely shaped to match the heart’s epicardium, or the outer layer of the wall of the heart.

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