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Why Ebola Kills Some People, Others Survive

October 21, 2014 10:29 am | by Lauran Neergaard - AP Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

People who shared an apartment with the country's first Ebola patient are emerging from quarantine healthy. And while Thomas Eric Duncan died and two U.S. nurses were infected caring for him, there are successes, too: A nurse infected in Spain has recovered, as have four American aid workers infected in West Africa. Even there, not everyone dies.

EDXRF for a Wide Range of Samples

October 20, 2014 2:16 pm | Product Releases | Comments

The JSX-1000S ElementEye from JEOL is an easy-to-use, smart solution for high-sensitivity...

Fairness is in the Brain

October 20, 2014 12:18 pm | News | Comments

Ever wondered how people figure out what is fair? Look to the brain for the answer....

Scientific Evidence Does Not Support 'Brain Game' Claims

October 20, 2014 11:39 am | News | Comments

A group of scholars issued a statement skeptical about the effectiveness of so-called "...

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Stem Cell-based Intestinal Tissue Implanted in Mice

October 20, 2014 10:21 am | Videos | Comments

Researchers have successfully transplanted “organoids” of functioning human intestinal tissue grown from pluripotent stem cells in a lab dish into mice– creating an unprecedented model for studying diseases of the intestine.        

Pre-stained Protein Ladders

October 17, 2014 1:08 pm | Product Releases | Comments

The Chameleon Pre-stained Protein Ladders from LI-COR offer the unique advantage of multi-colored visible and two-color near infrared (NIR) fluorescence detection in a single ladder.

New Front in War on Alzheimer’s, Other Protein-folding Diseases

October 17, 2014 12:06 pm | News | Comments

A surprise discovery that overturns decades of thinking about how the body fixes proteins that come unraveled greatly expands opportunities for therapies to prevent diseases such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s, which have been linked to the accumulation of improperly folded proteins in the brain.

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Babies’ Hearts May Beat Path to Heart Attack Treatments

October 17, 2014 11:50 am | Videos | Comments

The seemingly miraculous power of babies’ hearts to repair themselves after being injured has spurred a research team to investigate if this ability can be harnessed for new heart attack treatments.               

Explaining More About Airway Closure During Asthma Attacks

October 16, 2014 2:28 pm | News | Comments

In acute asthma, various triggers, including viral illnesses and aeroallergens, can cause acute narrowing of the airways leading to a life-threatening respiratory crisis and sometimes death. Researchers have identified a novel factor that puts the brakes on airway smooth-muscle contraction relevant to asthma.

Embryonic Stem Cells in Trial for Diabetes

October 16, 2014 11:44 am | by Cynthia Fox, Science Writer | Articles | Comments

As San Diego’s ViaCyte was in the midst of launching the first FDA-approved embryonic stem (ES) cell clinical trial for diabetics last week, Boston’s Harvard University reported that cells made from ES cells “cured” diabetic mice.     

Secondary Antibodies with Guaranteed Bright Staining

October 15, 2014 3:31 pm | Product Releases | Comments

Alexa Fluor 680/790 secondary antibodies from Abcam plc are for use in fluorescent western blotting.

Tiny, Sound-Powered Chip May Serve as Medical Device

October 15, 2014 2:43 pm | News | Comments

Using ultrasound to deliver power wirelessly, researchers are working on a new generation of medical devices that would be planted deep inside the body to monitor illness, deliver therapies and relieve pain.             

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2nd Dallas Nurse Tests Positive for Ebola

October 15, 2014 12:58 pm | by Emily Schmall and Nomaan Merchant - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

The second health care worker diagnosed with Ebola in Texas is a 29-year-old nurse who treated the Liberian man who died of the disease in a Dallas hospital.                           

Reversing Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis

October 14, 2014 2:42 pm | by Cynthia Fox, Science Writer | Articles | Comments

Lethal fibrosis in lungs of mice with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) can be reversed, say researchers. No drug on the market can do this. But the crew pulled it off, in mice, by temporarily restoring (a mimic of) one of the body’s own anti-fibrosis agents, sharply reduced in IPF: microRNA-29.

Cellular 'Snooze Button' Advances Cancer, Biofuel Research

October 14, 2014 11:48 am | News | Comments

The discovery of a cellular snooze button has allowed a team of scientists to potentially improve biofuel production and offer insight on the early stages of cancer.                         

Chemical from Broccoli Sprouts Promising Against Autism

October 14, 2014 11:41 am | News | Comments

Results of a small clinical trial suggest that a chemical derived from broccoli sprouts— and best known for claims that it can help prevent certain cancers— may ease classic behavioral symptoms in those with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs).   

Bioinspired Coating Repels Blood, Bacteria from Medical Devices

October 13, 2014 2:03 pm | News | Comments

A team of scientists and engineers developed a new surface coating for medical devices using materials already approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The coating repelled blood from more than 20 medically relevant substrates the team tested.

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Acid Storage Cabinet

October 10, 2014 11:50 am | Product Releases | Comments

The Acid Storage Cabinet from HEMCO is specifically designed for the storage of corrosive chemicals.

Manipulating Memory with Light

October 10, 2014 11:30 am | News | Comments

Just look into the light: not quite, but researchers have used light to erase specific memories in mice, and proved a basic theory of how different parts of the brain work together to retrieve episodic memories.            

'Good' Fat Can Fight Diabetes

October 10, 2014 10:38 am | Videos | Comments

Scientists have discovered a new class of molecules– produced in human and mouse fat– that protects against diabetes. The researchers found that giving this new fat to mice with the equivalent of type 2 diabetes lowered their elevated blood sugar.

Microsampler for Collection, Transport, Storage and Analysis

October 9, 2014 2:02 pm | Product Releases | Comments

Neoteryx LLC, a new technology spin-off of Phenomenex, Inc., offers the Mitra (RUO) Microsampling Device for the collection, transport, storage, and analysis of biological fluids.

Marburg, Ebola’s Relative, Cured in Monkeys

October 9, 2014 8:30 am | by Cynthia Fox, Science Writer | Articles | Comments

An experimental drug saved the lives of 16 of 16 monkeys with the Marburg virus, a killer near-indistinguishable from Ebola, which caused the death of a Ugandan health worker Oct. 6.                  

Sugar Linked to Memory Problems in Rats

October 8, 2014 12:35 pm | News | Comments

Studying rats as model subjects, scientists found that adolescents were at an increased risk of suffering negative health effects from sugar-sweetened beverage consumption.                       

Bioprinted 3-D Device Aids Blood Detoxification

October 8, 2014 10:45 am | by Skip Derra | Articles | Comments

A team of engineers has successfully developed a three-dimensional-printed device, which mimics the operation of the liver to remove dangerous toxins from the blood.                         

3 Win Chemistry Nobel for Super-zoom Microscopes

October 8, 2014 10:36 am | by Karl Ritter and Malin Rising – Associated Press – Associated Press | News | Comments

Two Americans and a German scientist won the Nobel Prize in chemistry Wednesday for finding ways to make microscopes more powerful than previously thought possible, allowing scientists to see how diseases develop inside the tiniest cells.   

The Importance of Primer Validation in Real-time PCR and New Tools That Make It Easier

October 7, 2014 2:20 pm | by Jamie Donnelly, Product Manager, Gene Expression Division, Bio-Rad Laboratories | Articles | Comments

Real-time qPCR is one of the most ubiquitous laboratory techniques in modern life sciences, commonly used for gene expression analyses and diagnosing infectious diseases. But despite being more than two decades old, many researchers continue to perform qPCR incorrectly and overlook the important step of primer validation and optimization.

Traceable Tissue Storage Solution

October 7, 2014 1:50 pm | Product Releases | Comments

Micronic offers externally threaded 3.00ml tube that provides a fully traceable storage solution for tissue samples.

A Needle in a Haystack: Technique Spots Stem Cells in Bone Marrow

October 7, 2014 1:27 pm | News | Comments

In a new study that should make it easier to develop stem-cell-based therapies, a team of researchers has identified three physical characteristics of MSCs that can distinguish them from other immature cells found in the bone marrow.     

Coffee-drinking Genes Identified

October 7, 2014 4:35 am | by Malcolm Ritter - AP Science Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

How much coffee do you drink every day? One cup in the morning? Or do you gulp it all day? Scientists have long known that your DNA influences how much java you consume. Now a huge study has identified some genes that may play a role.     

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