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Real-time PCR Dye

September 17, 2014 2:08 pm | Product Releases | Comments

Precision Blue real-time PCR dye from Bio-Rad Laboratories makes it easier for researchers to set up real-time PCR (qPCR) experiments. 

BST This Week #16: How Did Life on Earth Begin?

September 17, 2014 1:44 pm | Videos | Comments

On this episode of Bioscience Technology This Week, Christina Jakubowski reports on new...

One-minute Point-of-care Anemia Test Shows Promise

September 17, 2014 12:54 pm | News | Comments

A simple point-of-care testing device for anemia could provide more rapid diagnosis of the...

Brain Scans Forecast Early Reading Difficulties

September 16, 2014 2:31 pm | News | Comments

Researchers have used brain scans to predict how young children learn to read, giving...

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'Biospleen' is a Blood Cleanser for Sepsis

September 15, 2014 1:21 pm | News | Comments

Things can go downhill fast when a patient has sepsis, a life-threatening condition in which bacteria or fungi multiply in the blood—often too fast for antibiotics to help. A new device inspired by the human spleen may radically transform the way doctors treat sepsis.

Researchers Find Final Pieces to Circadian Clock Puzzle

September 15, 2014 12:59 pm | News | Comments

Researchers have discovered how two genes– Period and Cryptochrome– keep the circadian clocks in all human cells in time and in proper rhythm with the 24-hour day, as well as the seasons.                  

Schizophrenia is Actually 8 Genetic Disorders

September 15, 2014 12:41 pm | News | Comments

New research shows that schizophrenia isn’t a single disease but a group of eight genetically distinct disorders, each with its own set of symptoms.                             

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BST This Week #15: Bees May be Key to Antibiotic Alternatives

September 12, 2014 8:30 am | Videos | Comments

On this episode of Bioscience Technology This Week, Christina Jakubowski explores the role that bees may play in the search for antibiotic alternatives. Our second story focuses on how increased carbon dioxide levels in water can rob sharks of their ability to sense the smell of food.

Two Anti-Ebola Vaccines in Historic Race

September 11, 2014 3:38 pm | by Cynthia Fox | Articles | Comments

One of the most rapidly fast-tracked vaccines in history— an anti-Ebola “ChAd3” vaccine— just started clinical trial in humans, and may be done as soon as November. But a second fast-tracked anti-Ebola vaccine— called an “rVSV” vaccine— is hot on its heels.

Cells Put Off Protein Production During Times of Stress

September 11, 2014 3:26 pm | News | Comments

Researchers have shown that a stressed cell recognizes the buildup of misfolded proteins and responds by reshuffling its workload, much like a stressed out employee might temporarily move papers from an overflowing inbox into a junk drawer.   

New Defense Mechanism Against Viruses Discovered

September 11, 2014 2:05 pm | News | Comments

Researchers have discovered that a known quality control mechanism in human, animal and plant cells is active against viruses. They think it might represent one of the oldest defense mechanisms against viruses in evolutionary history.      

Ebola’s Ripple Effects

September 11, 2014 12:04 pm | Videos | Comments

The race to stamp out West Africa’s Ebola epidemic is not just about saving lives. It’s also about stemming an assault on society that could include food shortages and mass migration, morphing from a medical emergency into a broad humanitarian crisis.

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Breaking News: Blood Type May Affect Memory

September 11, 2014 8:30 am | News | Comments

People with blood type AB were 82 percent more likely to develop the thinking and memory problems than people with other blood types, according to a new study.                        

Microspectrophotometer for Raman, UV-Vis-NIR, Fluorescence

September 10, 2014 4:07 pm | Product Releases | Comments

The 20/30 Perfect Vision microspectrophotometer from CRAIC Technologies now has Raman microspectroscopy capabilities. 

Low-volume Spectrophotometer

September 10, 2014 12:03 pm | Product Releases | Comments

The SimpliNano from GE Healthcare is a simple-to-use microvolume spectrophotometer for straightforward concentration and purity measurements of nucleic acids and proteins.

BST This Week #14: IPF Cases Linked to Asbestos Exposure

September 10, 2014 12:00 pm | Videos | Comments

On this episode of Bioscience Technology This Week, Christina Jakubowski discusses a new study that shows a link between idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis cases and asbestos exposure. Our second story showcases how immune cells use two critical receptors to clear dead cells from the body.

Brain Structure May Predict Risky Behavior

September 10, 2014 11:30 am | News | Comments

Some people avoid risks at all costs, while others will put their wealth, health, and safety at risk without a thought. Researchers have found that the volume of the parietal cortex in the brain could predict where people fall on the risk-taking spectrum.

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Lady Baboons With Guy Pals Live Longer

September 10, 2014 11:19 am | News | Comments

Numerous studies have linked social interaction to improved health and survival in humans, and new research confirms that the same is true for baboons.                             

Honesty Linked to Prefrontal Brain Region

September 9, 2014 1:18 pm | News | Comments

Are humans programmed to tell the truth? Not when lying is advantageous, says a new study. The report ties honesty to a region of the brain that exerts control over automatic impulses.                   

Breaking News: Prediabetes Ups Cancer Risk 15%

September 9, 2014 9:04 am | News | Comments

A meta-analysis comprising 16 studies and 891,426 participants from various regions of the world shows that prediabetes increases the risk of cancer by 15 percent, with differing risks depending on the type of cancer.         

In Directing Stem Cells, Study Shows Context Matters

September 8, 2014 3:57 pm | News | Comments

Figuring out how blank slate stem cells decide which kind of cell they want to be when they grow up— a muscle cell, a bone cell, a neuron— has been no small task for science. Now, a team of researchers has added a new wrinkle to the cell differentiation equation.

Single Cell Smashes, Rebuilds Its Own Genome

September 8, 2014 3:52 pm | News | Comments

Life can be so intricate and novel that even a single cell can pack a few surprises, according to a new study. The pond-dwelling, single-celled organism Oxytricha trifallax has the remarkable ability to break its own DNA into nearly a quarter-million pieces and rapidly reassemble those pieces when it's time to mate, the study says.

NIH Finds Forgotten Ricin in Lab

September 8, 2014 12:00 pm | by Lauran Neergaard - AP Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

The National Institutes of Health said it has uncovered a nearly century-old container of ricin and a handful of other forgotten samples of dangerous pathogens as it combs its laboratories for improperly stored hazardous materials.     

SEM for 3-D Volume Imaging of Cells and Tissues

September 5, 2014 3:32 pm | Fei Company | Product Releases | Comments

The Teneo VS scanning electron microscope (SEM) from FEI offers a VolumeScope capability for life science applications.

Oxidized LDL Might Actually be 'Good Guy'

September 5, 2014 3:24 pm | News | Comments

A team of investigators has made a thought-provoking discovery about a type of cholesterol previously believed to be a "bad guy" in the development of heart disease and other conditions.                    

Nature or Nurture? It’s All About the Message

September 5, 2014 1:53 pm | News | Comments

Were Albert Einstein and Leonardo da Vinci born brilliant or did they acquire their intelligence through effort? No one knows for sure, but telling people the latter– that hard work trumps genes– causes instant changes in the brain and may make them more willing to strive for success, indicates a new study.

U.S. in Danger of Losing Biotechnology Edge, Experts Warn

September 5, 2014 1:45 pm | News | Comments

The United States is in danger of losing its biomedical edge to countries that are aggressively funding research into personalized medicine, according to a key message from the 21st Century Cures Roundtable at National Jewish Health.      

Flexible Microscopes for Multi-user Facilities

September 4, 2014 3:15 pm | Product Releases | Comments

The BA410E microscope series from Motic encompasses improvements in optics, illumination and staging, expanding opportunities for education, clinical analyses, routine and research microscopy.

Messenger Molecules a Part of Arthritis Puzzle

September 4, 2014 2:05 pm | News | Comments

The way in which some cells alter their behavior at the onset of osteoarthritis has been identified for the first time. Researchers found that changes in the rate at which molecules in joint cartilage called mRNA are created and destroyed are fundamental to causing this change in behavior.

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