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Secondary Antibodies with Guaranteed Bright Staining

December 22, 2014 4:52 pm | Product Releases | Comments

Alexa Fluor 680/790 secondary antibodies from Abcam plc are for use in fluorescent western blotting.

Meet The Newest Surgeon General

December 22, 2014 10:15 am | by Ryan Bushey, Associate Editor | Articles | Comments

President Obama's pick for the position turned out to be controversial.    ...

Tour Agents: N. Korea May Soon Lift Ebola Restrictions

December 22, 2014 9:50 am | by Eric Talmadge - Associated Press | News | Comments

North Korea, never a country to take the threat of foreign invasion lightly, has been under...

Unable to Prove Claims, “Acid Bath” Stem Cell Researcher Tenders Resignation

December 19, 2014 10:16 am | by Cynthia Fox, Science Writer | Articles | Comments

A young scientist from Harvard University and the Riken Institute, who claimed to make...

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10 Up-and-Coming Healthcare Medical Innovations

December 17, 2014 5:32 pm | by Christina Jakubowski, Managing Editor | Articles | Comments

The Cleveland Clinic recently unveiled their annual Top 10 Medical Innovations for 2015– a list that casts an optimistic light on up-and-coming healthcare advances that may reach consumers next year.                                       

Reading Leaves a Dramatic Imprint on the Brain

December 17, 2014 4:23 pm | by Cynthia Fox, Science Writer | Articles | Comments

A good book recreates the world so robustly that it activates some of the same brain regions that “everyday life” does, according to a recent PLOS One study. In the study, innovative MRI analyses of people reading a richly imaginative book showed movement of characters occurring in a brain region where others’ motions are processed in the real world.

Targeted Computer Games Can Change Behavior of Psychopaths

December 17, 2014 11:03 am | by NYU Langone | News | Comments

Psychopaths generally do not feel fear and fail to consider the emotions of others, or reflect upon their behavior — traits that make them notoriously difficult to treat.                                              

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Women in Cell Biology Award Winners Announced at ASCB Meeting

December 17, 2014 10:05 am | by Stephanie Guzowski, Editor, Drug Discovery & Development | Articles | Comments

Three exceptional women were given awards for their achievements and contributions to the scientific community at the 2014 ASCB (American Society for Cell Biology) meeting recently held in Philadelphia, Pa.

Going After Colon Cancer With Strep Bacteria

December 17, 2014 9:40 am | by Skip Derra, Contributing Writer | Articles | Comments

A novel therapeutic to fight colon cancer by using the bacteria primarily responsible for causing strep throat is being explored in the labs of John McCormick of the Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry at the University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada.

Genes Tell Story of Birdsong and Human Speech

December 12, 2014 9:28 am | News | Comments

After a massive international effort to sequence and compare the entire genomes of 48 species of birds representing every major order of the bird family tree, scientists discovered that birds and humans use essentially the same genes to speak.  

Fish Use Chemical Camouflage from Diet to Hide from Predators

December 12, 2014 9:22 am | News | Comments

A species of small fish uses a homemade coral-scented cologne to hide from predators, a new study has shown, providing the first evidence of chemical camouflage from diet in fish.                     

Imaging and Analysis with Flying Colors: Part Two

December 12, 2014 8:30 am | by Mark Clymer, Datacolor Inc., and Jerry Sedgewick, Imaging and Analysis | Articles | Comments

The dictionary definition that a “picture is a representation of a person or scene” just doesn’t apply to those images produced in scientific research and from clinical specimens. It would be more accurate to describe these images in one word: artifact.

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Merging for Cures: GPI, RMF to Combine

December 11, 2014 3:26 pm | by Christina Jakubowski, Managing Editor | News | Comments

The Genetics Policy Institute (GPI) and the Regenerative Medicine Foundation (RMF) will merge, the leaders of both organizations announced at the opening session of the 10th Annual World Stem Cell Summit (WSCS).            

Meniscus Regenerated with 3-D-printed Implant

December 11, 2014 8:30 am | Videos | Comments

Researchers have devised a way to replace the knee’s protective lining, called the meniscus, using a personalized 3-D-printed implant, or scaffold, infused with human growth factors that prompt the body to regenerate the lining on its own.    

A New Way to Turn Genes On

December 11, 2014 8:30 am | News | Comments

Using a gene-editing system originally developed to delete specific genes, researchers have now shown that they can reliably turn on any gene of their choosing in living cells.                     

Brain Inflammation a Hallmark of Autism

December 11, 2014 8:30 am | News | Comments

While many different combinations of genetic traits can cause autism, brains affected by autism share a pattern of ramped-up immune responses, an analysis of data from autopsied human brains revealed.               

Modular NGS Gene Capture Pools

December 10, 2014 1:38 pm | Product Releases | Comments

The ixGen Predesigned Gene Capture Pools and Plates from IDT are the latest addition to IDT’s growing portfolio of high quality, customizable next generation sequencing products.

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Viewing Your Genome on a Blackberry Passport

December 10, 2014 1:15 pm | Videos | Comments

One of the recurring themes of the 2014 Forbes Healthcare Summit was that smartphones and mobile apps would play a larger role in the industry. However, the safety and security of these platforms are being debated. Nanthealth’s CEO Dr. Patrick Soon-Shiong feels he may have a solution.

New ‘Electronic Skin’ for Prosthetics, Robotics

December 10, 2014 12:57 pm | News | Comments

For the first time, scientists report the development of a stretchable “electronic skin” closely modeled after our own that can detect not just pressure, but also what direction it’s coming from.               

Worm's Mental GPS Helps Them Find Food

December 10, 2014 12:08 pm | News | Comments

Scientists have developed a mathematical theory–based on roundworm foraging that predicts how animals decide to switch from localized to very broad searching.                          

Allen Institute Snags $100M to Create Cell Science Institute

December 9, 2014 3:04 pm | News | Comments

Philanthropist and entrepreneur Paul G. Allen announced a commitment of $100 million to create the Allen Institute for Cell Science in Seattle. The Allen Institute for Cell Science will take a multidisciplinary, team science-driven approach to understanding a fundamental and yet elusive question in cell science.

rRNA Library Prep Kits for Eukaryotic Metagenomics

December 9, 2014 9:35 am | Product Releases | Comments

The NEXTflex 18S ITS Amplicon-Seq Kit from Bioo Scientific simplifies the preparation of multiplexed amplicon libraries spanning the hypervariable Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS) region of eukaryotic 18S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes.

NIH Funds Robots to Assist People with Disabilities

December 8, 2014 2:39 pm | News | Comments

New research in robotics might help with stroke rehabilitation, guide wheelchairs, and assist children with Autism Spectrum Disorder. Projects investigating co-robotics are the focus of new funding from the National Institutes of Health.    

10 Emerging Ethical Dilemmas in Science and Technology

December 8, 2014 12:47 pm | News | Comments

The John J. Reilly Center for Science, Technology, and Values at the University of Notre Dame has released its annual list of emerging ethical dilemmas and policy issues in science and technology for 2015.             

Drug Development in a Time of Ebola

December 8, 2014 11:44 am | by Ryan Bushey, Associate Editor | Videos | Comments

Forbes kicked off the 2014 Healthcare Summit with a session titled, “Drug Development in A Time of Ebola,” where Forbes senior editor Matthew Herper interviewed Edward Cox and Lucianna Borio, two high-ranking officials at the FDA.

Smoking Linked to Loss of Y Chromosome in Men

December 5, 2014 12:32 pm | News | Comments

In a new study, researchers demonstrated an association between smoking and loss of the Y chromosome in blood cells. The researchers have previously shown that loss of the Y chromosome is linked to cancer.          

Predicting Alzheimer’s Disease With Blood Tests: Early Detection, Ethical Concerns

December 4, 2014 8:46 am | by Stephanie Guzowski, Editor, Drug Discovery & Development | Articles | Comments

If you could take a blood test that could detect — with nearly 100% accuracy — whether you were genetically destined to get Alzheimer’s disease, would you take that test? Read more...                     

IBM Helps You Donate Computer Power to Fight Ebola

December 3, 2014 2:46 pm | by Brandon Bailey, AP Tech Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

IBM has engineered a way for everyone to join the fight against Ebola - by donating processing time on their personal computers, phones or tablets to researchers. Read more...                                                  

Learning a Second Language: First-Rate Exercise for the Brain

December 3, 2014 8:30 am | by Bioscience Technology Staff | Articles | Comments

The brain is so exquisitely sensitive to language that it only takes six weeks of learning Chinese for the neurons of English speakers to rewire. And those whose brains are fully bilingual are more facile at learning generally.       

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