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Women Less Welcome Than Men in Fields Demanding Brilliance

January 28, 2015 4:25 pm | by Cynthia Fox, Science Writer | Articles | Comments

Women are less welcome than men in fields—including philosophy, physics, math, and music composition—where brilliance is viewed as more important than effort, says a co-ed Princeton University/University of Illinois group in a recent Science.

Researchers Design Tailored Tissue Adhesives

January 28, 2015 2:47 pm | by Anne Trafton, MIT | News | Comments

After undergoing surgery to remove diseased sections of the colon, up to 30 percent of patients...

Harvard's Odyssey Unlocks Big Data

January 28, 2015 2:40 pm | by Harvard Gazette | News | Comments

As technology evolves and becomes further integrated into society, massive amounts of data are...

Incubators for Demanding Cell Culture Applications

January 26, 2015 9:57 am | Product Releases | Comments

The Thermo Scientific Heracell VIOS incubator series is ideal for academic research and...

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Cell Culture Media for DHFR Negative Cell Lines

January 23, 2015 4:47 pm | Product Releases | Comments

EMD Millipore expanded its Cellvento CHO cell culture media portfolio of chemically defined, non-animal origin media formulations to include new products that specifically address DHFR negative cell lines.

President Obama Announces Precision Medicine Initiative

January 22, 2015 12:32 pm | by Ryan Bushey, Associate Editor | Articles | Comments

The President briefly mentioned the project during the State of The Union earlier this week.                            

Video-based Therapy May Benefit Babies at Risk of Autism

January 22, 2015 10:14 am | by University of Manchester | News | Comments

Researchers at The University of Manchester have, for the first time, shown that video-based therapy for families with babies at risk of autism improves infants’ engagement, attention and social behaviour, and might reduce the likelihood of such children developing later autism.

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Government Healthcare Website Quietly Sharing Personal Data

January 21, 2015 9:08 am | by Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar and Jack Gillum - Associated Press | News | Comments

The government's health insurance website is quietly sending consumers' personal data to private companies that specialize in advertising and analyzing Internet data for performance and marketing.           

Blueberries, Avocados and Cocoa Beans May Keep Cardiologists at Bay

January 20, 2015 5:21 pm | by Bioscience Technology Staff | Articles | Comments

Times have changed. It used to be that an apple a day kept the doctor away. But three recent studies indicate this mantra could be changed to “a blueberry- avocado-cocoa-bean-smoothie a day” keeps the doctor away—if the doctor is a cardiologist.

Eradicating Ebola: What Will It Take?

January 20, 2015 10:25 am | by Ryan Bushey, Associate Editor | Articles | Comments

These factors may not be enough to finally end the Ebola epidemic in West Africa.                              

3D Culture System Could Change Therapeutic Approaches

January 16, 2015 11:09 am | by CSHL | News | Comments

Pancreatic cancer is one of the most deadly forms of cancer, with only 6 percent of patients surviving five years after diagnosis. Today, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL) and The Lustgarten Foundation jointly announce the development of a new model system to grow both normal and cancerous pancreatic cells in the laboratory.

Tracking Physical Activity and Recovery from Spine Surgery

January 16, 2015 10:39 am | by Nora Dunne, Northwestern Medicine | News | Comments

When am I going to recover? It’s a common question from patients, yet a difficult one for physicians to answer. In an effort to better predict recovery over time for patients who undergo spine surgery, Northwestern Medicine investigators are monitoring physical activity using Fitbit trackers in an ongoing study.

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Orbitrap-based Mass Spectrometer

January 15, 2015 3:32 pm | Product Releases | Comments

The Thermo Scientific Q Exactive Focus LC-MS/MS is designed to make the qualitative and quantitative power of Orbitrap-based instruments available to customers who use quadrupole time-of-flight (Q-TOF) mass spectrometry or other technologies.

Red-Hot Coverage for Study: “Cold Noses Cause Colds"

January 15, 2015 9:46 am | by Cynthia Fox, Science Writer | Articles | Comments

Colds can come from cold noses, according to a high-profile study in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS).                                          

CESI-MS System for Therapeutic Biologics

January 14, 2015 4:19 pm | Product Releases | Comments

The CESI 8000 System for Biologics Characterization from AB Sciex, a separation-electrospray ionization system for mass spectrometry (MS), combines of capillary electrophoresis (CE) and electrospray ionization (ESI) technologies to create an integrated workflow solution.

First Contracting Human Muscle Grown in Lab

January 14, 2015 3:42 pm | by Duke University | News | Comments

The lab-grown tissue should soon allow researchers to test new drugs and study diseases in functioning human muscle outside of the human body.                    

Five Biotech Startups to Watch in 2015

January 13, 2015 5:02 pm | by Ryan Bushey, Associate Editor | Articles | Comments

These companies have an interesting year ahead of them.                                   

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Mass Spec Imaging Services

January 13, 2015 4:01 pm | Product Releases | Comments

The Ion Mobility Software from Protea Biosciences Group is now available on a Waters Synapt G2S High Definition mass spectrometer as a powerful extension to Protea’s portfolio of mass-spectrometry-based molecular imaging services.

Genome Sequencing of 200-Year-Old Whales May Help Humans Fight Disease

January 13, 2015 9:07 am | by Cynthia Fox, Science Writer | Articles | Comments

For the first time, the genome of a mammal longer-lived than man has been sequenced: the bowhead whale, who lives 200-plus years, and gets far less cancer given its size.                                       

High-Performance LC/MS System

January 12, 2015 5:02 pm | Product Releases | Comments

Advion Inc. introduced an affordable, high-performance liquid chromatography system to complement its line of expression compact mass spectrometers (CMS).

IEEE Unveils Top 10 Technology Trends for 2015

January 12, 2015 3:10 pm | by IEEE | News | Comments

In the coming year, while consumers will be treated to a dizzying array of augmented reality, wearables, and low-cost 3-D printers, computer researchers will be tackling the underlying technology issues that make such cutting-edge consumer electronics products possible.    

Virtual Reality vs. Real Life: How Brain Neurons Light Up

January 12, 2015 8:56 am | by Cynthia Fox, Science Writer | Articles | Comments

Space-mapping brain neurons do not “light up” in scans when exposed to the virtual reality (VR) at work in kids’ video games, the way they do in the “real world.” The neurons—found in the hippocampus—only mirror the “reality” state some 50 percent of the time.

Pros and Cons: Alcohol Consumption for 10M Years

January 8, 2015 5:16 pm | by Cynthia Fox, Science Writer | Articles | Comments

We’ve been imbibing alcohol for ten million years, and the start of that long drinking binge coincided with our descent from the trees. So alcohol may have brought us (along with lots of hangovers), some measure of our humanity.                                               

Neuroprosthetics for Paralysis: New Implant on the Spinal Cord

January 8, 2015 5:00 pm | by Lionel Pousaz, ACTU | News | Comments

EPFL scientists have managed to get rats walking on their own again using a combination of electrical and chemical stimulation. But applying this method to humans would require multifunctional implants that could be installed for long periods of time on the spinal cord without causing any tissue damage. 

Wearable Tracking Devices Alone Won't Drive Change

January 8, 2015 4:38 pm | by University of Pennsylvania | News | Comments

New Year’s weight loss resolutions are in full swing, but despite all the hype about the latest wearable tracking devices, there’s little evidence that this technology alone can change behavior and improve health for those that need it most, according to a new online-first viewpoint piece in JAMA. 

Egg and Sperm Cells Made From Adult Cells

January 7, 2015 1:23 pm | by Cynthia Fox, Science Writer | Articles | Comments

For the first time, scientists have made human sperm and egg precursor cells from human adult skin cells. The work, detailed in a recent paper in Cell, could ultimately change the age at which women stop having children.                                      

Mystery Lingers Over STAP “Acid Bath” Stem Cells

January 7, 2015 10:22 am | by Cynthia Fox, Science Writer | Articles | Comments

An investigatory panel hired by the Riken Institute in Toyko, Japan recently issued reports finding that STAP “acid bath” stem cells were, in the main, simply garden-variety embryonic stem (ES) cell lines.                        

New Clues Why Older Women Are More Susceptible to Breast Cancer

January 5, 2015 3:48 pm | by Skip Derra, Contributing Writer | Articles | Comments

The idea that breast cancer becomes more prevalent with age is fairly well established, but the reasons why are still uncertain. Now, scientists from the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have new insights into why older women are more susceptible to breast cancer.

A Fascinating Year in Breast Cancer Advances

January 5, 2015 8:50 am | by Cynthia Fox, Science Writer | Articles | Comments

Some of the most important advances in breast cancer this year were related to all kinds of heterogeneity: within tumors, between tumors in a single patient, and between tumors in early and later stages, according to oncologists speaking at conferences, and contacted by Bioscience Technology.

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