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Mosaicism: Study Clarifies Parents as Source of New Mutations

July 31, 2014 3:36 pm | News | Comments

Scientists have long speculated that mosaicism plays a bigger role in the transmission of rare disease mutations than is currently known. Now, a study sheds new light on the frequency of mosaicism in genomic disorders and its influence on recurrence risk.

Engineering a Protein to Prevent Brain Damage from Toxic Agents

July 31, 2014 3:21 pm | News | Comments

Research at New York University is paving the way for a breakthrough that may prevent brain...

New Way to Generate Insulin-producing Cells in Diabetes

July 31, 2014 3:20 pm | Videos | Comments

A new study has found that a peptide called caerulein can convert existing cells in the pancreas...

Strict Genomic Partitioning by Biological Clock Separates Key Metabolic Functions

July 31, 2014 3:10 pm | News | Comments

Much of the liver’s metabolic function is governed by circadian rhythms—our own body clock—and...

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FDA to Start Regulating Lab-developed Tests

July 31, 2014 12:24 pm | by Matthew Perron - AP Health Writer - The Associated Press | News | Comments

The Food and Drug Administration says it will begin regulating laboratory-developed tests, a growing class of medical diagnostics that have never before been subject to federal oversight.                  

Autistic Brain Less Flexible at Taking on Tasks

July 31, 2014 9:41 am | News | Comments

The brains of children with autism are relatively inflexible at switching from rest to task performance, according to a new study. Instead of changing to accommodate a job, connectivity in key brain networks of autistic children looks similar to connectivity in the resting brain. And the greater this inflexibility, the more severe the child’s manifestations of repetitive and restrictive behaviors that characterize autism, the study found.

Birth Weight and Breastfeeding Have Implications for Children’s Health Decades Later

July 31, 2014 9:20 am | News | Comments

Young adults who were breastfed for three months or more as babies have a significantly lower risk of chronic inflammation associated with cardiovascular and metabolic diseases, according to research from the Brown School at Washington University in St. Louis.

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TEM Phase Plate Solution

July 30, 2014 4:24 pm | Product Releases | Comments

FEI's new phase plate is a stable, durable solution to increase the contrast of sensitive biological samples and is available on most TEM platforms from FEI.

Confocal Microscopy App for iPad

July 30, 2014 4:15 pm | Product Releases | Comments

The Confocal iPad app from Leica Microsystems introduces researchers and students of the life sciences to confocal methods and technologies.

Bioscience Technology This Week #4: Gold Nanoparticles Show Promise for Drug Delivery

July 30, 2014 2:02 pm | Videos | Comments

On this episode of Bioscience Technology This Week, Editor-in-Chief Rob Fee reports on gold nanoparticles' promise in drug delivery. Our second story examines the work being done to decipher the wheat genome and the implications of this work.

Exploring 3-D Printing to Make Organs for Transplants

July 30, 2014 1:19 pm | News | Comments

Printing whole new organs for transplants sounds like something out of a sci-fi movie, but the real-life budding technology could one day make actual kidneys, livers, hearts and other organs for patients who desperately need them. Scientists are reporting new understanding about the dynamics of 3-D bioprinting that takes them a step closer to realizing their goal of making working tissues and organs on-demand.

Retinal Regeneration in Zebrafish

July 30, 2014 12:27 pm | Videos | Comments

Biologists are studying retinal regeneration in zebrafish to find ways to combat human eye diseases. The small, minnow-like fish have eyes that develop in a way very similar to humans, but have the ability to regenerate retinal cells following an injury.

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Breaking News: Blood Test Could Predict Suicide Risk

July 30, 2014 8:30 am | News | Comments

Researchers say they have discovered a chemical alteration in a single human gene linked to stress reactions that could give doctors a simple blood test to reliably predict a person’s risk of attempting suicide.            

Deadly Melanoma Cases Jump 200%, Report Says

July 30, 2014 8:22 am | by Anne Flaherty - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

Stop sunbathing and using indoor tanning beds, the acting U.S. surgeon general warned in a report released Tuesday that cites an alarming 200 percent jump in deadly melanoma cases since 1973.                 

Advance in Capturing Elusive Circulating Tumor Cells

July 29, 2014 3:33 pm | by Cynthia Fox | Articles | Comments

When cancers spread into the bloodstream, they often take on different characteristics, requiring different therapies. But it is hard to find these rare blood-borne cells. So, relapsed patients often do not get personalized care. Now, researchers have come up with a solution that zeros in on elusive circulating tumor cells (CTCs).

Stem Cells From Nerves Form Teeth

July 29, 2014 12:22 pm | News | Comments

Researchers have discovered that stem cells inside the soft tissues of the tooth come from an unexpected source, namely nerves. These findings contribute to brand new knowledge of how teeth are formed, how they grow and how they are able to self-repair.

TEM for Life, Biomaterials Sciences

July 28, 2014 2:56 pm | Product Releases | Comments

The Titan Halo transmission electron microscope (TEM) from FEI provides high-quality optical performance with enhanced flexibility for multi-scale applications in life and biomaterials sciences.

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Many People Never Grow Out of Growing Pains

July 28, 2014 11:48 am | News | Comments

A new research project shows that many adolescents suffer from knee pain for several years. The pain impacts both sporting activities and quality of life.                            

Cloning Offers Intriguing Stem Cell-Making Tips

July 28, 2014 10:36 am | by Cynthia Fox | Articles | Comments

Two recent studies— one human, one mouse— have found cloning creates better pluripotent stem cells than the Nobel Prize-winning induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) method. A third study also came out supporting the conclusions.     

Total Darkness During the Night is a Key to Success of Breast Cancer Therapy

July 25, 2014 2:05 pm | News | Comments

Exposure to light at night, which shuts off nighttime production of the hormone melatonin, renders breast cancer completely resistant to tamoxifen, a widely used breast cancer drug, says a new study by Tulane University School of Medicine cancer researchers.

Is Europe Putting Cancer Research at Risk?

July 25, 2014 1:53 pm | News | Comments

The European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO) has expressed concern that the proposed EU General Data Protection Regulation could make cancer research impossible and add a significant burden to both doctors and cancer patients.         

Powerful HIV Antibodies May Require Assist from Second Antibody to Develop

July 25, 2014 1:40 pm | News | Comments

One strategy for developing a highly effective HIV vaccine is to learn how some HIV-infected people naturally develop antibodies that can stop a high percentage of global HIV strains from infecting human cells in the laboratory. These so-called broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) develop too late to help infected people overcome the virus.

New Imaging Agent Provides Better Picture of the Gut

July 25, 2014 1:36 pm | News | Comments

A multi-institutional team of researchers has developed a new nanoscale agent for imaging the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. This safe, noninvasive method for assessing the function and properties of the GI tract in real time could lead to better diagnosis and treatment of gut diseases.

Key Muscle Component's Atomic Structure Revealed

July 25, 2014 12:54 pm | News | Comments

In a new study, biophysicists describe– in minute detail- how actin filaments are stabilized at one of their ends to form a basic muscle structure called the sarcomere.                        

Monitoring the Rise and Fall of the Microbiome

July 25, 2014 12:23 pm | News | Comments

Trillions of bacteria live in each person’s digestive tract, but their role in human health is not well understood. To help shed light on the role of these bacteria, a team of researchers recently tracked fluctuations in the bacterial populations of two research subjects over a full year.

Only 8.2% of DNA is ‘Functional’

July 24, 2014 2:45 pm | News | Comments

Only 8.2 percent of human DNA is likely to be doing something important – is “functional”– say researchers. This figure is very different from one given in 2012, when some scientists stated that 80 percent of our genome has some biochemical function.

Dyes Used to Paint New Picture of Disease

July 24, 2014 2:12 pm | News | Comments

By using brightly hued dyes, George Mason University (GMU) researchers discovered an innovative way to reveal where proteins touch each other, possibly leading to new treatments for cancer, arthritis, heart disease, and even lung disease.

Study Links Autistic Behaviors to Enzyme

July 24, 2014 1:48 pm | News | Comments

Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is a genetic disorder that causes obsessive-compulsive and repetitive behaviors, and other behaviors on the autistic spectrum, as well as cognitive deficits. It is the most common inherited cause of mental impairment and the most common cause of autism. Now biomedical scientists at the University of California, Riverside have published a study that sheds light on the cause of autistic behaviors in FXS. 

Head of Troubled CDC Anthrax Lab Resigns

July 23, 2014 1:20 pm | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

Health officials say that the head of the government lab which potentially exposed workers to live anthrax has resigned. Michael Farrell was head of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention lab since 2009.            

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