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The Lead

Bioscience Bulletin: Brain Boosters; New Technology

May 22, 2015 2:53 pm | by Bevin Fletcher, Associate Editor | News | Comments

Welcome to Bioscience Technology’s new series Bioscience Bulletin, where we bring you the five most popular headlines from the week.

Proteins May Slow Memory Loss in People With Alzheimer’s

May 22, 2015 10:04 am | by Iowa State University | News | Comments

Certain proteins may slow the devastating memory loss caused by Alzheimer’s disease, according...

Beyond Average

May 22, 2015 9:37 am | by Harvard University | News | Comments

New platforms genetically barcode tens of thousands of cells at a time

Seeking Deeper Understanding of How the Brain Works

May 22, 2015 9:17 am | by MIT | News | Comments

Edward Boyden develops techniques to study the brain, and how it operates, in finer detail.

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Women With MRI Abnormality Nine Times More Likely to Get Breast Cancer

May 22, 2015 9:11 am | by Cynthia Fox, Science Writer | Articles | Comments

Healthy women possessing a certain abnormality on MRIs are nine times more likely to get breast cancer, according to research published in Radiology. The abnormality is called background parenchymal enhancement (BPE), a phenomenon in which areas of normal background breast tissue appear white, or enhanced.

Scientists Figure Out How Vitamin E Keeps Muscles Healthy

May 21, 2015 10:57 am | by Georgia Regents University | News | Comments

Body builders have it right: vitamin E does help build strong muscles, and scientists appear to have figured out one important way it does it.

News on Asthma and Peanut Allergies Could Lead to Misdiagnosis, Unnecessary Testing

May 21, 2015 10:48 am | by University of Michigan | News | Comments

Allergist raises concerns about highly-publicized research findings suggesting that children with asthma are prone to peanut allergy.

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Panda Gut Bacteria Can’t Efficiently Digest Bamboo

May 21, 2015 10:40 am | by American Society for Microbiology | News | Comments

It’s no wonder that giant pandas are always chewing and eating, say Chinese researchers: their gut bacteria are not the type for efficiently digesting bamboo. The bamboo-eating giant panda actually harbors a carnivore-like gut microbiota predominated by bacteria such as Escherichia/Shigella and Streptococcus, according to new research.

Uncovering Mechanisms of Replication in HPV

May 21, 2015 10:28 am | by Northwestern University | News | Comments

Scientists have identified proteins that mediate aspects of virus replication in the lifecycle of human papillomavirus (HPV), a finding that may lead to new therapeutic targets for treatment of infections caused by the virus.

Ancient Lake Challenges Understanding of Evolution

May 21, 2015 10:05 am | by University of Aberdeen | News | Comments

An ancient lake could hold the key to our understanding of how complex life evolved on Earth, according to recent research.

Shining a New Light on the Immune System

May 21, 2015 9:45 am | by University of St. Andrews | News | Comments

Scientists have developed a revolutionary method of identifying cells of the immune system with “molecular fingerprints” which could pave the way for the rapid detection of conditions such as leukemia and lymphoma from a small blood sample.

Adults Harbor Lots of Risky Autoreactive Immune Cells

May 20, 2015 10:48 am | by Stanford University | News | Comments

Even though self-targeting immune cells remain prolific in adults’ bloodstreams, some kind of internal emergency brake seems to prevent them from triggering autoimmune disease — usually.

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Genetics Allow Animals to Produce their Own Sunscreen

May 20, 2015 10:33 am | by Joe Shust, Editor, Continuity Insights | Articles | Comments

Researchers have discovered that unique genome sequences allow fish, reptiles, birds and other animals to create a compound that acts as sunscreen.

Study Explains How Early Childhood Vaccination Reduces Leukemia Risk

May 20, 2015 10:09 am | by University of California San Francisco | News | Comments

A team of researchers has discovered how a commonly administered vaccine protects against acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), the most common type of childhood cancer.

Researchers Identify Potentially Effective Treatment for Methamphetamine Addiction

May 20, 2015 10:07 am | by UCLA | News | Comments

A new study has found that Naltrexone, a drug used to treat alcoholism, may also be a promising treatment for addiction to methamphetamine.

New Technology Turns Smartphone into a DNA-Scanning Microscope

May 20, 2015 10:02 am | by Bevin Fletcher, Associate Editor | Articles | Comments

Researchers at University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) have developed a new technology that turns a smartphone into a DNA-scanning fluorescent microscope.  Lead researcher Aydogan Ozcan, Howard Hughes Medical Institute chancellor professor at UCLA, sat down with Bioscience Technology to talk about this advancement and its implications for resource-poor labs, and for personalized medicine.

Neuroscientists ID Part of Brain Devoted to Processing Speech

May 19, 2015 9:49 am | by New York University | News | Comments

A team of  neuroscientists has identified a part of the brain exclusively devoted to processing speech. Its findings point to the superior temporal sulcus (STS), located in the temporal lobe, and help settle a long-standing debate about role-specific neurological functions.

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Inflammation Stops the Biological Clock

May 19, 2015 9:33 am | by University of Pennsylvania | News | Comments

An important link between the human body clock and the immune system has relevance for better understanding inflammatory and infectious diseases, researchers discovered.

Designing Better Medical Implants

May 19, 2015 9:09 am | by Anne Trafton, MIT | News | Comments

Optimal size and shape allow implantable devices to last longer in the body.

Discovery Opens Door for Homemade Morphine, Painkillers

May 19, 2015 9:07 am | by Alicia Chang, AP Science Writer | News | Comments

Scientists have figured out all the steps to make morphine and similar painkillers without using opium poppies, opening the door for home-brewed drugs and even wider abuse.

Future for Warming US: Not Just the Heat but the Humanity

May 19, 2015 9:06 am | by Seth Borenstein, AP Science Writer | News | Comments

The combination of global warming and shifting population means that by mid-century, there will be a huge increase in the number of Americans sweating through days that are extremely hot, a new study says.

Cognition Improves After Supplemented Mediterranean Diet, Finds a Rare Trial

May 19, 2015 8:54 am | by Cynthia Fox, Science Writer | Articles | Comments

Cognition improves in older people who eat a plant-based Mediterranean diet with antioxidant-rich extra virgin olive oil or mixed nuts, according to rare clinical trial research published by JAMA Internal Medicine.

Microchip Captures Circulating Tumor Clusters, Providing Clue to Cancer’s Spread

May 18, 2015 11:01 am | by Seth Augenstein, Digital Reporter | Articles | Comments

A tiny microfluidic chip can capture circulating clusters of tumor cells, researchers said. The finding could provide important new clues about how cancer spreads – and could even be a “breakthrough technology,” they said.

The U.S. Installs New Guidelines for Genetic Testing Accuracy

May 18, 2015 10:00 am | by Ryan Bushey, Associate Editor | Articles | Comments

The hope is that this standard can be used among the scientific community to see how well their genomic analysis tools match up.

Drug Perks Up Old Muscles and Aging Brains

May 18, 2015 9:39 am | by University of California Berkeley | News | Comments

Whether you’re brainy, brawny or both, you may someday benefit from a drug found to rejuvenate aging brain and muscle tissue.

Orange Juice is Good for Your Brain

May 18, 2015 9:16 am | by Unviersity of Reading | News | Comments

Drinking orange juice could help improve brain function in elderly people, according to new research from the University of Reading.

Vitamin D Levels Help Predict Survival of Sick Cats

May 15, 2015 10:39 am | by Bevin Fletcher, Associate Editor | Articles | Comments

Vitamin D could give your sickly feline friend its 10th life, according to a recent study. New research from the University of Edinburgh found that higher levels of vitamin D were linked to increased survival changes for hospitalized cats.

Long-Term Depression May Double Stroke Risk for Middle-Aged Adults

May 15, 2015 10:30 am | by University of California San Francisco | News | Comments

Adults over 50 who have persistent symptoms of depression may have twice the risk of stroke as those who do not, according to a new study led by researchers at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and UC San Francisco. Researchers found that stroke risk remains higher even after symptoms of depression go away, particularly for women.

Diagnosing Sepsis through Genetic Signature

May 15, 2015 9:11 am | by Stanford University | News | Comments

Investigators at the Stanford University School of Medicine have identified a pattern of gene activity that could help scientists create a blood test for quickly and accurately detecting whether patients are experiencing a deadly immune-system panic attack.

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