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Benchmark Proposed for Better Replication of Stem Cell Development

November 4, 2014 1:33 pm | News | Comments

In a study that could provide the foundation for scientists to more precisely replicate natural stem cell development in an artificial environment, researchers have established a standard to assess how conditions used to procure stem cells in the lab compare to those found in a human embryo.

Drug and Device Firms Paid $3.5B to Care Providers

September 30, 2014 2:02 pm | by Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

Striving to shine a light on potential ethical conflicts in medicine, the Obama administration...

700 Babies Maybe Exposed to TB at Texas Hospital

September 19, 2014 9:35 pm | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

More than 700 infants may have been exposed to tuberculosis at an El Paso hospital over the past...

FDA Revises Food Safety Rules Due Next Year

September 19, 2014 5:35 pm | by Mary Clare Jalonick - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

The Food and Drug Administration on Friday revised sweeping food safety rules proposed last year...

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White House Orders Plan for Antibiotic Resistance

September 19, 2014 8:30 am | by Mary Clare Jalonick - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

Signaling the seriousness of the threat posed by antibiotic-resistant germs, President Barack Obama on Thursday ordered the government to create a national plan to fight them by early 2015.                  

NIH Finds Forgotten Ricin in Lab

September 8, 2014 12:00 pm | by Lauran Neergaard - AP Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

The National Institutes of Health said it has uncovered a nearly century-old container of ricin and a handful of other forgotten samples of dangerous pathogens as it combs its laboratories for improperly stored hazardous materials.     

E-cigarettes Might Help Smokers Quit, AHA Says

August 25, 2014 1:22 am | by Marilynn Marchione - AP Chief Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

The American Heart Association's first policy statement on electronic cigarettes backs them as a last resort to help smokers quit. The American Cancer Society has no formal policy but quietly took a similar stance in May.          

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New Restrictions on Hydrocodone to Take Effect

August 22, 2014 8:23 am | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

The federal government is finalizing new restrictions on hundreds of medicines containing hydrocodone, the highly addictive painkiller that has grown into the most widely prescribed drug in the U.S.               

CDC Scientist Kept Quiet About Flu Blunder

August 15, 2014 12:21 pm | by Mike Stobbe - AP Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

An investigation into a potentially dangerous blunder at a government lab found that a scientist kept silent about the accident and revealed it only after other employees noticed something fishy.               

WHO: Ebola Outbreak is a Public Health Emergency

August 8, 2014 3:21 am | by Maria Cheng - AP Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

The World Health Organization on Friday declared the Ebola outbreak in West Africa to be an international public health emergency that requires an extraordinary response to stop its spread. The WHO announced the Ebola outbreak — the largest and longest in history — is worrying enough to merit being declared an international health emergency. WHO declared similar emergencies for the swine flu pandemic in 2009 and for polio in May.

FDA Warns of Infection-causing Tattoo Inks

August 7, 2014 3:23 am | by Mary Clare Jalonick - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

Thinking about getting inked? Check the bottle first. The Food and Drug Administration is warning tattoo parlors, their customers and those buying at-home tattoo kits that not all tattoo ink is safe.               

FDA to Start Regulating Lab-developed Tests

July 31, 2014 12:24 pm | by Matthew Perron - AP Health Writer - The Associated Press | News | Comments

The Food and Drug Administration says it will begin regulating laboratory-developed tests, a growing class of medical diagnostics that have never before been subject to federal oversight.                  

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Is Europe Putting Cancer Research at Risk?

July 25, 2014 1:53 pm | News | Comments

The European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO) has expressed concern that the proposed EU General Data Protection Regulation could make cancer research impossible and add a significant burden to both doctors and cancer patients.         

Head of Troubled CDC Anthrax Lab Resigns

July 23, 2014 1:20 pm | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

Health officials say that the head of the government lab which potentially exposed workers to live anthrax has resigned. Michael Farrell was head of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention lab since 2009.            

300 Vials Labeled Influenza, Dengue Found at Lab

July 16, 2014 6:20 pm | by Matthew Perrone - AP Health Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

The same federal scientist who recently found forgotten samples of smallpox at a federal lab also uncovered over 300 additional vials, many bearing the names of highly contagious viruses and bacteria.               

NIH Creates Network to Tackle Mysterious Diseases

July 1, 2014 4:20 pm | by Lauran Neergaard - AP Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

The government is expanding its "mystery disease" program, funding a network at six universities around the country to help diagnose patients with diseases so rare they've been told they're undiagnosable. The National Institutes of Health has evaluated hundreds of these cold-case patients in its campus research hospital as part of a pilot program since 2008. Demand is so great, there's a waiting list.  

FDA Prepping Long-awaited Plan to Reduce Salt

June 17, 2014 3:19 am | by Mary Clare Jalonick - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

Food companies and restaurants could soon face government pressure to make their foods less salty — a long-awaited federal effort to try to prevent thousands of deaths each year from heart disease and stroke. The Food and Drug Administration is preparing to issue voluntary guidelines asking the food industry to lower sodium levels.

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NIH Opens Research Hospital to Outside Scientists

March 13, 2014 2:44 pm | News | Comments

Ten projects that will enable non-government researchers to conduct clinical research at the National Institutes of Health’s Clinical Center in Bethesda, Md. were announced. Through these three-year, renewable awards of up to $500,000 per year, scientists from institutions across the United States will collaborate with government scientists in a highly specialized hospital setting.

'How Well Did You Sequence that Genome?' NIST, Consortium Partners Have Answer

February 26, 2014 1:43 pm | News | Comments

In December 2013, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved the first high-throughput DNA sequencer. Helping get the new device approved was another first: the initial use of a reference set of standard genotypes, or "coded blueprints" of a person's genetic traits.

US, 26 Countries Launch Effort to Fight Outbreaks

February 13, 2014 11:08 am | by Lauran Neergaard - AP Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

The U.S. and 26 other nations are announcing a new collaboration to prevent and fight outbreaks of dangerous infectious diseases before they spread around the globe. U.S. health officials say the Global Health Security Agenda is a priority because there are too many blind spots — countries that lack the health care necessary to sound the alarm when a new infection emerges.

NIST Categorizes Bio Scaffolds by Characteristic Cell Shapes

February 12, 2014 11:20 am | News | Comments

Getting in the right shape might be just as important in a biology lab as a gym. Shape is thought to play an important role in the effectiveness of cells grown to repair or replace damaged tissue in the body. To help design new structures that enable cells to "shape up," researchers at the NIST have come up with a way to measure, and more importantly, classify, the shapes cells tend to take in different environments.

US Lead in Science and Technology Shrinking

February 10, 2014 11:42 am | News | Comments

The United States' predominance in science and technology eroded further during the last decade, as several Asian nations—particularly China and South Korea—increased their innovation capacities. According to a report released by the National Science Board, the major Asian economies, taken together, now perform a larger share of global R&D than the U.S.

Durable End to AIDS Will Require HIV Vaccine Development

February 6, 2014 12:58 pm | Videos | Comments

Broader global access to lifesaving antiretroviral therapies and wider implementation of proven HIV prevention strategies could potentially control and perhaps end the HIV/AIDS pandemic. However, a safe and at least moderately effective HIV vaccine is needed to reach this goal more expeditiously and in a more sustainable way, according to a new commentary from Anthony S. Fauci, MD, director of the NIAID.

NIH, Industry and Non-profits Join Forces to Speed Validation of Disease Targets

February 5, 2014 8:41 am | News | Comments

The National Institutes of Health, 10 biopharmaceutical companies and several nonprofit organizations today launched an unprecedented partnership to transform the current model for identifying and validating the most promising biological targets of disease for new diagnostics and drug development.

NIST Cell Membrane Model Studied as Future Diagnostic Tool

January 31, 2014 12:06 pm | News | Comments

Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and in Lithuania have used a NIST-developed laboratory model of a simplified cell membrane to accurately detect and measure a protein associated with a serious gynecological disease, bacterial vaginosis (BV), at extraordinarily low concentrations.

The Massachusetts “Obamacare” Model Works

January 9, 2014 11:21 am | by Cynthia Fox | Articles | Comments

The partial model for Obamacare—Massachusetts’ near-universal health care program, adopted in 2006—resulted in measurably improved health. According to a study conducted by researchers from Harvard University and the University of Michigan—with help from the Centers for Disease Control (CDC)—the health of Massachusetts residents rose more in the first five years of the program than did the health of residents in other New England states.

Thermo Fisher Scientific Selling Life Science Businesses to GE

January 6, 2014 12:56 pm | News | Comments

Thermo Fisher Scientific announced that it has signed an agreement to sell its cell culture (sera and media), gene modulation and magnetic beads businesses to GE Healthcare, a unit of General Electric Company, for approximately $1.06 billion.   

New Drug Approvals from FDA Declined in 2013

January 3, 2014 10:50 am | by Matthew Perrone -- AP Health Writer -- Associated Press | News | Comments

The Food and Drug Administration approved 27 first-of-a-kind drugs in 2013, down from 39 new medications in 2012, which was a 15-year high.                                

23andMe Plays Nice

December 17, 2013 10:23 am | by Cynthia Fox | Articles | Comments

23andMe, the consumer genetics company halted by the FDA for ignoring repeated questions, is being conciliatory. The company offered raw gene data, and interpretative reports, to the general public on more than 240 diseases and traits until Dec. 5, when it announced it would cease taking new customers as a result of FDA action. However: “the company is now writing conciliatory letters to regulators,” says an insider.

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