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The Lead

Total Darkness During the Night is a Key to Success of Breast Cancer Therapy

July 25, 2014 2:05 pm | News | Comments

Exposure to light at night, which shuts off nighttime production of the hormone melatonin, renders breast cancer completely resistant to tamoxifen, a widely used breast cancer drug, says a new study by Tulane University School of Medicine cancer researchers.

Scientists One Step Closer to Stem Cell Therapy for MS

July 25, 2014 1:29 pm | News | Comments

Scientists at The New York Stem Cell Foundation (NYSCF) Research Institute are one step closer...

Gene Variation May Modify Cardiovascular Benefit of Aspirin

July 18, 2014 1:01 pm | News | Comments

A daily low-dose aspirin is widely prescribed for the prevention of cardiovascular disease. Now...

Scientists Find Way to Trap, Kill Malaria Parasite

July 17, 2014 10:20 am | News | Comments

Scientists may be able to entomb the malaria parasite in a prison of its own making, researchers...

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Taking B Vitamins Won’t Prevent Alzheimer’s

July 16, 2014 11:31 am | News | Comments

Taking B vitamins doesn't slow mental decline as we age, nor is it likely to prevent Alzheimer's disease, conclude researchers who have assembled all the best clinical trial data involving 22,000 people to offer a final answer on this debate.   

Gene Therapy Brings ALS Cure One Step Closer

July 11, 2014 12:44 pm | News | Comments

Researchers have moved one step closer to a gene therapy that could silence the faulty SOD1 gene responsible for triggering a form of motor neuron disease also known as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS).             

Girl Hoped to Have Been Cured of HIV Has Relapsed

July 11, 2014 8:30 am | by Marilynn Marchione - AP Chief Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

A Mississippi girl born with the AIDS virus and in remission for years despite stopping treatment now shows signs that she still harbors HIV — and therefore is not cured.                       

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Rotten Egg Gas Holds Key to Healthcare Therapies

July 9, 2014 4:28 pm | News | Comments

It may smell awful and have a reputation for being highly toxic, but when used in the right tiny dosage, hydrogen sulfide is now being found to offer potential health benefits in a range of issues, from diabetes to stroke, heart attacks and dementia.

Tiny DNA Pyramids Enter Bacteria Easily and Deliver a Deadly Payload

July 9, 2014 11:53 am | News | Comments

Bacterial infections usually announce themselves with pain and fever but often can be defeated with antibiotics—and then there are those that are sneaky and hard to beat. Now, scientists have built a new weapon against such pathogens in the form of tiny DNA pyramids. Their study found the nanopyramids can flag bacteria and kill more of them than medicine alone.

AIDS Research Team Loses $1.38M Grant

July 9, 2014 8:30 am | by David Pitt | News | Comments

An AIDS research team at Iowa State University will not get the final $1.38 million payment of a National Institutes of Health five-year grant after a team member admitted last year to faking research results.            

First Cancer Immunotherapy for Dogs Developed

July 7, 2014 2:51 pm | News | Comments

A few therapies derived from human medicine are available for dogs, but a very successful form of therapy by which antibodies inhibit tumor growth has not yet been available for animals. Now, scientists have developed, for the first time, antibodies to treat cancer in dogs.

Proton Therapy Has Advantages Over IMRT

July 3, 2014 8:30 am | Videos | Comments

A new study by radiation oncologists has found that proton beam therapy significantly improved disease free survival and tumor control when compared to IMRT in a variety of advanced head and neck cancers.               

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New Reprogramming Method Makes Better Stem Cells

July 3, 2014 8:30 am | News | Comments

A team of researchers has shown for the first time that stem cells created using different methods produce differing cells. The findings provide new insights into the basic biology of stem cells and could ultimately lead to improved therapies.  

Potential Alzheimer’s Drug Prevents Abnormal Blood Clots in Brain

June 30, 2014 11:30 am | News | Comments

New experiments have identified a compound that might halt the progression of Alzheimer’s by interfering with the role amyloid-beta plays in the formation of blood clots.                       

Cancer Chain in the Membrane

June 24, 2014 1:50 pm | Videos | Comments

Supercomputer simulations have shown that clusters of a protein linked to cancer warp cell membranes, according to scientists at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) Medical School. This research on these protein clusters, or aggregates as scientists call them, could help guide design of new anticancer drugs.

Broken Gene Found to Protect Against Heart Disease

June 19, 2014 2:41 pm | News | Comments

By scouring the DNA of thousands of patients, researchers have discovered four rare gene mutations that not only lower the levels of triglycerides, a type of fat in the blood, but also significantly reduce a person’s risk of coronary heart disease—dropping it by 40 percent. The mutations all cripple the same gene, called APOC3, suggesting a powerful strategy in developing new drugs against heart disease.

Computation Leads to Better Understanding of Influenza Virus Replication

June 18, 2014 10:50 am | News | Comments

Computer simulations that reveal a key mechanism in the replication process of influenza A may help defend against future deadly pandemics. Treating influenza relies on drugs, such as Amantadine, that are becoming less effective due to viral evolution. But University of Chicago scientists have published computational results that may give drug designers the insight they need to develop the next generation of effective influenza treatment.

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ASCO Recap: Leaning in at the Plate, Swinging for the Fences

June 17, 2014 1:57 pm | by Neil Canavan | Articles | Comments

Everyone loves a grand slam: the crack of the bat, the arc of the ball as it sails over the fence, a tip of the batter’s cap, a triumphal trot around as the bases empty out, but really, it’s the lesser efforts that made it all possible—a double, a single, a walk—it’s the incremental gains that win the game. It’s called Small Ball. This year’s ASCO, absent the heavy hitters, was all about the small ball.

Discovery May Lead to Improvements in Diagnosing, Treating Alzheimer's Disease

June 16, 2014 1:51 pm | News | Comments

A new drug target to fight Alzheimer's disease has been discovered by a research team led by Gong Chen, a professor of biology and the Verne M. Willaman Chair in Life Sciences at Penn State. The discovery also has potential for development as a novel diagnostic tool for Alzheimer's disease.

Experimental Drug Targets Skin, Lung Cancers

June 4, 2014 1:55 pm | News | Comments

Researchers are reporting promising treatment milestones for patients with deadly skin and lung cancers who are being treated with an experimental drug called MK-3475.                        

Steroids Prescribed in ICU Linked to Delirium

May 27, 2014 2:15 pm | News | Comments

New research suggests that critically ill patients receiving steroids in a hospital’s intensive care unit (ICU) are significantly more likely to develop delirium. Results of the study suggest minimizing the use of steroids could reduce delirium in the ICU.

Food-Disinfecting Method May Fight Drug-Resistant Bacteria

May 27, 2014 2:11 pm | News | Comments

Technology currently used to disinfect food may help solve one of the most challenging problems in medicine today: the proliferation of bacteria resistant to antibiotics and other antimicrobial drugs.               

New Target Found for Chronic Pain Treatment

May 22, 2014 1:57 pm | News | Comments

Researchers have found a new target for treating chronic pain: an enzyme called PIP5K1C. The research shows that PIP5K1C controls the activity of cellular receptors that signal pain.                   

Printing Replacements

May 22, 2014 1:44 pm | by Robert Fee, Editor-in-Chief, Bioscience Technology | Articles | Comments

3-D printing promises to revolutionize engineering, and many speculate that it could have a huge impact on medicine, too. Many speculate that useful organs grown in the lab three-dimensionally on scaffolds is now closer to fact than fiction.

Neutron Beams Reveal How Antibodies Cluster in Solution

May 20, 2014 2:00 pm | News | Comments

Results from neutron spin-echo analysis are an important advance towards enabling subcutaneous injections of concentrated biopharmaceuticals used to treat cancer and autoimmune disorders (e.g. arthritis, multiple sclerosis). The insights obtained could help drug companies reduce the viscosity and mitigate phase separation in injectable biopharmaceuticals.

Measles Vaccine Can Kill Multiple Myeloma Cells

May 15, 2014 11:00 am | Videos | Comments

In a proof-of-principle clinical trial, researchers have demonstrated that virotherapy— destroying cancer with a virus that infects and kills cancer cells but spares normal tissues— can be effective against the deadly cancer multiple myeloma.   

Anti-Depressant Reduces Alzheimer’s Plaque Growth by 78 Percent

May 14, 2014 2:03 pm | by Cynthia Fox | Articles | Comments

A common antidepressant can dramatically halt growth of Alzheimer’s plaque. A team from Missouri and Pennsylvania report today in Science Translational Medicine this reduction occurs in both humans and mice. It gives the drug, the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) citalopram, a possible future role as a prophylactic—the first in Alzheimer’s Disease (AD), if bigger studies are supportive.

ED Drug Restores Blood Flow in Muscular Dystrophy

May 8, 2014 1:45 pm | News | Comments

Researchers have found that a commonly prescribed drug restores blood flow to oxygen-starved muscles of boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy, a genetic muscle-wasting disease.                     

MERS Experts Working on Way to Block Virus

May 6, 2014 12:45 pm | News | Comments

A team of researchers is creating molecules designed to shut down the Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus, or MERS-CoV, that recently arrived in the United States.                       

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