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U.S. to Begin Safety Testing Ebola Vaccine

August 28, 2014 9:23 am | by Seth Borenstein - AP Science Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

Federal researchers next week will start testing humans with an experimental vaccine to prevent the deadly Ebola virus. The NIH announced today that it is launching the safety trial on a vaccine developed by the agency's National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and GSK.

New Restrictions on Hydrocodone to Take Effect

August 22, 2014 8:23 am | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

The federal government is finalizing new restrictions on hundreds of medicines containing...

Combining Vaccines Boosts Polio Immunity

August 22, 2014 8:22 am | by Lauran Neergaard - AP Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

New research suggests a one-two punch could help battle polio in some of the world's most remote...

Drug Candidate Blocks 'Chili-pepper Receptor'

August 20, 2014 11:53 am | News | Comments

 As anyone who has bitten into a chili pepper knows, its burning spiciness— though...

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Antibiotics in Early Life May Alter Long-term Immunity

August 18, 2014 11:34 am | News | Comments

New research found that receiving antibiotic treatments early in life can increase susceptibility to specific diseases later on. The study helps scientists understand how different antibiotics affect good bacteria.        

Early Antibiotic Exposure Gives Mice Lifelong Metabolic Issues

August 15, 2014 11:59 am | News | Comments

A new study suggests that antibiotic exposure during a critical window of early development disrupts the bacterial landscape of the gut, home to trillions of diverse microbes, and permanently reprograms the body’s metabolism, setting up a predisposition to obesity.

Ebola Puts Focus on Drugs Made in Tobacco Plants

August 15, 2014 2:22 am | by Malcolm Ritter - AP Science Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

It's an eye-catching angle in the story of an experimental treatment for Ebola: The drug comes from tobacco plants that were turned into living pharmaceutical factories. Using plants this way — sometimes called "pharming" — can produce complex and valuable proteins for medicines.

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NewLink Genetics: Ready to Test Ebola Vaccine

August 14, 2014 10:22 am | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

An Iowa drug developer says it has enough doses of a possible vaccine for the deadly Ebola virus to launch an initial round of human testing. NewLink Genetics Chief Financial Officer Gordon Link says the timing of the trials is uncertain, but the company is receiving help from a number of sources to speed up the process.

Priest Dies of Ebola; UN Debates Treatment Ethics

August 12, 2014 8:21 am | by Maria Cheng and Ciaran Giles - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

A Spanish missionary priest being treated for Ebola died Tuesday in a Madrid hospital amid a worldwide debate over who should get experimental Ebola treatments. After holding a teleconference with medical experts around the world, the WHO declared it is ethical to use unproven Ebola drugs and vaccines in the current outbreak.

Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis: Hope, At Last

August 11, 2014 2:26 pm | by Cynthia Fox | Articles | Comments

There have been stunning “firsts” in research on idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), a mysterious disease that stiffens and stills the lungs, killing half its victims in three years. In May, results of Phase 3 clinical trials on the first two effective drugs for IPF were published in the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM). And in June, the first paper explaining IPF was published in Science Translational Medicine.

Can People with Type 2 Diabetes Live Longer?

August 8, 2014 1:26 pm | News | Comments

A large-scale University-led study involving more than 180,000 people shows that patients treated with a drug widely prescribed for type 2 diabetes can live longer than people without the condition. The findings indicate that a drug known as metformin, used to control glucose levels in the body and already known to exhibit anticancer properties, could offer prognostic and prophylactic benefits to people without diabetes.

Drug Target Identified for Common Childhood Blood Cancer

July 31, 2014 12:00 pm | News | Comments

In what is believed to be the largest genetic analysis of what triggers and propels progression of tumor growth in a common childhood blood cancer, researchers report that they have identified a possible new drug target for treating the disease. 

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Dissolvable Fabric Loaded with Medicine Might Offer Faster Protection Against HIV

July 31, 2014 9:27 am | News | Comments

University of Washington bioengineers have discovered a potentially faster way to deliver a topical drug that protects women from contracting HIV. Their method spins the drug into silk-like fibers that quickly dissolve when in contact with moisture, releasing higher doses of the drug than possible with other topical materials such as gels or creams.

Bioscience Technology This Week #4: Gold Nanoparticles Show Promise for Drug Delivery

July 30, 2014 2:02 pm | Videos | Comments

On this episode of Bioscience Technology This Week, Editor-in-Chief Rob Fee reports on gold nanoparticles' promise in drug delivery. Our second story examines the work being done to decipher the wheat genome and the implications of this work.

Scientists ID New Mechanism of Drug Resistance

July 28, 2014 11:24 am | News | Comments

Microorganisms can evade treatment by acquiring mutations in the genes targeted by antibiotics or antifungal drugs. Now, a new study has shown that microorganisms can use a temporary silencing of drug targets to gain the benefits of drug resistance without the commitment.

Total Darkness During the Night is a Key to Success of Breast Cancer Therapy

July 25, 2014 2:05 pm | News | Comments

Exposure to light at night, which shuts off nighttime production of the hormone melatonin, renders breast cancer completely resistant to tamoxifen, a widely used breast cancer drug, says a new study by Tulane University School of Medicine cancer researchers.

Scientists One Step Closer to Stem Cell Therapy for MS

July 25, 2014 1:29 pm | News | Comments

Scientists at The New York Stem Cell Foundation (NYSCF) Research Institute are one step closer to creating a viable cell replacement therapy for multiple sclerosis from a patient's own cells.                  

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Gene Variation May Modify Cardiovascular Benefit of Aspirin

July 18, 2014 1:01 pm | News | Comments

A daily low-dose aspirin is widely prescribed for the prevention of cardiovascular disease. Now, a new study suggests that common genetic variation may modify the cardiovascular benefit of aspirin.                

Scientists Find Way to Trap, Kill Malaria Parasite

July 17, 2014 10:20 am | News | Comments

Scientists may be able to entomb the malaria parasite in a prison of its own making, researchers at are reporting. The malaria parasite is among the world’s deadliest pathogens.                     

Taking B Vitamins Won’t Prevent Alzheimer’s

July 16, 2014 11:31 am | News | Comments

Taking B vitamins doesn't slow mental decline as we age, nor is it likely to prevent Alzheimer's disease, conclude researchers who have assembled all the best clinical trial data involving 22,000 people to offer a final answer on this debate.   

Gene Therapy Brings ALS Cure One Step Closer

July 11, 2014 12:44 pm | News | Comments

Researchers have moved one step closer to a gene therapy that could silence the faulty SOD1 gene responsible for triggering a form of motor neuron disease also known as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS).             

Girl Hoped to Have Been Cured of HIV Has Relapsed

July 11, 2014 8:30 am | by Marilynn Marchione - AP Chief Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

A Mississippi girl born with the AIDS virus and in remission for years despite stopping treatment now shows signs that she still harbors HIV — and therefore is not cured.                       

Rotten Egg Gas Holds Key to Healthcare Therapies

July 9, 2014 4:28 pm | News | Comments

It may smell awful and have a reputation for being highly toxic, but when used in the right tiny dosage, hydrogen sulfide is now being found to offer potential health benefits in a range of issues, from diabetes to stroke, heart attacks and dementia.

Tiny DNA Pyramids Enter Bacteria Easily and Deliver a Deadly Payload

July 9, 2014 11:53 am | News | Comments

Bacterial infections usually announce themselves with pain and fever but often can be defeated with antibiotics—and then there are those that are sneaky and hard to beat. Now, scientists have built a new weapon against such pathogens in the form of tiny DNA pyramids. Their study found the nanopyramids can flag bacteria and kill more of them than medicine alone.

AIDS Research Team Loses $1.38M Grant

July 9, 2014 8:30 am | by David Pitt | News | Comments

An AIDS research team at Iowa State University will not get the final $1.38 million payment of a National Institutes of Health five-year grant after a team member admitted last year to faking research results.            

First Cancer Immunotherapy for Dogs Developed

July 7, 2014 2:51 pm | News | Comments

A few therapies derived from human medicine are available for dogs, but a very successful form of therapy by which antibodies inhibit tumor growth has not yet been available for animals. Now, scientists have developed, for the first time, antibodies to treat cancer in dogs.

New Reprogramming Method Makes Better Stem Cells

July 3, 2014 8:30 am | News | Comments

A team of researchers has shown for the first time that stem cells created using different methods produce differing cells. The findings provide new insights into the basic biology of stem cells and could ultimately lead to improved therapies.  

Proton Therapy Has Advantages Over IMRT

July 3, 2014 8:30 am | Videos | Comments

A new study by radiation oncologists has found that proton beam therapy significantly improved disease free survival and tumor control when compared to IMRT in a variety of advanced head and neck cancers.               

Potential Alzheimer’s Drug Prevents Abnormal Blood Clots in Brain

June 30, 2014 11:30 am | News | Comments

New experiments have identified a compound that might halt the progression of Alzheimer’s by interfering with the role amyloid-beta plays in the formation of blood clots.                       

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