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Coffee, with Pill, Reduces Breast Cancer Recurrence

April 25, 2013 11:03 am | News | Comments

Drinking coffee could decrease the risk of breast cancer recurring in patients taking the widely used drug Tamoxifen, a study has found. Patients who took the pill, along with two or more cups of coffee daily, reported less than half the rate of cancer recurrence.

Video Reveals How Drugs Kill Cancer

April 25, 2013 10:14 am | News | Comments

Scientists have discovered why a particular cancer drug is so effective at killing cells. Their findings could be used to aid the design of future cancer treatments. Using high-powered laser-based microscopes, researchers made videos of the process by which rituximab binds to a diseased cell and then attracts white blood cells known as natural killer (NK) cells to attack.

Breast Cancer Drug Enhanced for Aggressive Types

April 24, 2013 11:15 am | News | Comments

Tamoxifen is a time-honored breast cancer drug used to treat millions of women with early-stage and less-aggressive disease. Now, a team of researchers has shown how to exploit tamoxifen’s secondary activities so that it might work on more aggressive breast cancer.

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Novel Therapy Safe for ALS

April 24, 2013 9:24 am | News | Comments

An investigational treatment for an inherited form of Lou Gehrig’s disease has passed an early phase clinical trial for safety, researchers report. The researchers have shown that the therapy produced no serious side effects in patients with the disease, also known as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The phase 1 trial’s results also demonstrate that the drug was successfully introduced into the central nervous system.

Small Molecule Destroys Potentially Dangerous Cells

April 23, 2013 12:52 pm | News | Comments

Pluripotent stem cells can turn, or differentiate, into any cell type in the body, such as nerve, muscle or bone, but inevitably some of these stem cells fail to differentiate and end up mixed in with their newly differentiated daughter cells.

Gene Expression Data Yields Significant Tumor Breakthroughs

April 22, 2013 12:48 pm | News | Comments

A massive study analyzing gene expression data from 22 tumor types has identified multiple metabolic expression changes associated with cancer. The analysis also identified hundreds of potential drug targets that could cut off a tumor’s fuel supply or interfere with its ability to synthesize essential building blocks.

Stem Cell Transplant Restores Memory, Learning

April 22, 2013 12:21 pm | News | Comments

For the first time, human embryonic stem cells have been transformed into nerve cells that helped mice regain the ability to learn and remember. A new study shows that human stem cells can successfully implant themselves in the brain and then heal neurological deficits.

Researchers Test Caffeine's Effect on Cancer

April 18, 2013 11:04 am | News | Comments

Researchers are abuzz after using fruit flies to find new ways of taking advantage of caffeine’s lethal effects on cancer cells—results that could one day be used to advance cancer therapies for people. Previous research has established that caffeine interferes with processes in cancer cells that control DNA repair, a finding that has generated interest in using the stimulant as a chemotherapy treatment.

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Protein Discovery Prevents HIV Reservoirs

April 17, 2013 1:11 pm | by Einstein | News | Comments

Researchers have discovered how the protein that blocks HIV-1 from multiplying in white blood cells is regulated. HIV-1 is the virus that causes AIDS, and the discovery could lead to novel approaches for addressing HIV-1 "in hiding"– namely eliminating reservoirs of HIV-1 that persist in patients undergoing antiretroviral therapy.

Molecule Treats Leukemia by Blocking DNA Repair

April 17, 2013 10:44 am | News | Comments

Researchers have identified a molecule that prevents repair of some cancer cells, providing a potential new "genetic chemotherapy" approach to cancer treatment that could significantly reduce side effects and the development of treatment resistance compared with traditional chemotherapy.

Anxious About Life? Tylenol May do the Trick

April 16, 2013 11:38 am | News | Comments

Researchers have found a new potential use for the over-the-counter pain drug Tylenol. Typically known to relieve physical pain, the study suggests the drug may also reduce the psychological effects of fear and anxiety over the human condition, or existential dread.

MRSA-killing Antibiotic Developed

April 12, 2013 12:03 pm | News | Comments

A new broad range antibiotic has been found to kill a wide range of bacteria, including drug-resistant Staphylococcus (MRSA) bacteria that do not respond to traditional drugs. The antibiotic, Epimerox, targets weaknesses in bacteria that have long been exploited by viruses that attack themeria.

TB Fighter, Promoter Reveals Split Identity

April 12, 2013 11:17 am | News | Comments

Tumor necrosis factor– normally an infection-fighting substance produced by the body– can actually heighten susceptibility to tuberculosis if its levels are too high. A new study shows how excess production of this disease-cell destroyer at first acts as a TB germ killer. But later the opposite occurs: Too much tumor necrosis factor encourages TB pathogens to multiply in the body.

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New Way to Clear Cholesterol from Blood Discovered

April 11, 2013 10:50 am | News | Comments

Researchers have identified a new potential therapeutic target for lowering cholesterol that could be an alternative or complementary therapy to statins. Scientists in the lab of David Ginsburg at the Life Sciences Institute inhibited the action of a gene responsible for transporting a protein that interferes with the ability of the liver to remove cholesterol from the blood in mice.

Medication Nation: Study Shows Antibiotic Overuse

April 10, 2013 4:59 pm | by MIKE STOBBE - AP Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

U.S. doctors are prescribing enough antibiotics to give them to 4 out of 5 Americans every year, an alarming pace that suggests they are being overused, a new government study finds. Overuse is one reason antibiotics are losing their punch, making infections harder to treat.

Human 3D Skin Models

April 10, 2013 1:36 pm | by Scott Hickman, Marketing Manager, Toxicology, BioReliance Corporation | Articles | Comments

The development of the 3D reconstructed human skin micronucleus (RSMN) assay is the first to overcome the limitations of traditional cell culture methods. It can provide a more biologically relevant result than standard 2D in vitro genotoxicity assays, since it provides a functional stratum corneum, which accounts for permeability and appears to have a normal dermal metabolic capability.

Tiny Proteins Prevent Bacterial Gene Transcription

April 10, 2013 10:10 am | News | Comments

In the search for new antibiotics, researchers are taking an unusual approach: They are developing peptides, short chains of protein building blocks that effectively inhibit a key enzyme of bacterial metabolism. The road from gene to protein has an important stop along the way: ribonucleic acid, or RNA.

New Brain Cancer Treatment is More Effective, Less Toxic

April 9, 2013 10:00 am | News | Comments

A Phase 2 clinical trial, described this week in the Journal of Clinical Oncology, tested a new protocol for treating a relatively rare form of brain cancer, primary CNS lymphoma, that may change the standard of care for this disease, according to doctors who led the research.

Drug for Morning Sickness Making a Comeback

April 8, 2013 7:55 pm | by LAURAN NEERGAARD - AP Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

Talk about a comeback: A treatment pulled off the market 30 years ago has won Food and Drug Administration approval again as the only drug specifically designated to treat morning sickness. That long-ago safety scare, prompted by hundreds of lawsuits claiming birth defects, proved to be a false alarm.

Engineered T Cells Kill Tumors, Spare Normal Tissue

April 8, 2013 11:09 am | News | Comments

The need to distinguish between normal cells and tumor cells is a feature that has been long sought for most types of cancer drugs. Tumor antigens, unique proteins on the surface of a tumor, are potential targets for a normal immune response against cancer.

Protein’s Cousin Sheds Light on Its Gout-linked Relative

April 8, 2013 10:38 am | News | Comments

Scientists have found out how a gout-linked genetic mutation contributes to the disease: by causing a breakdown in a cellular pump that clears an acidic waste product from the bloodstream. By comparing this protein pump to a related protein involved in cystic fibrosis, the researchers also identified a compound that partially repairs the pump in laboratory tests.

Dengue Cases May be 4 Times More Common Than Known

April 7, 2013 1:18 pm | by MARIA CHENG - AP Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

There may be nearly four times as many people infected with the tropical disease dengue globally than was previously believed, according to a new study. The World Health Organization has estimated there are about 50 million to 100 million cases of dengue, also known as "break-bone fever," every year.

New Hope for Rare Genetic Disease

April 4, 2013 11:02 am | News | Comments

Scientists have found that a drug treatment administered at the earliest signs of a rare genetic disease could prevent the condition from developing in later life.

Global Strategy Aims to Eradicate Polio by 2018

April 2, 2013 5:44 pm | by LAURAN NEERGAARD - AP Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

A new global plan aims to end most cases of polio by late next year, and essentially eradicate the paralyzing disease by 2018— if authorities can raise the $5.5 billion needed to do the work, health officials said.

Common Virus Model Used to ‘Fortify’ Adult Stem Cells

April 2, 2013 11:05 am | News | Comments

Using the same strategy that a common virus employs to evade the human immune system, researchers have modified adult stem cells to increase their survival– with the goal of giving the cells time to exert their natural healing abilities.

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