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Computation Leads to Better Understanding of Influenza Virus Replication

June 18, 2014 10:50 am | News | Comments

Computer simulations that reveal a key mechanism in the replication process of influenza A may help defend against future deadly pandemics. Treating influenza relies on drugs, such as Amantadine, that are becoming less effective due to viral evolution. But University of Chicago scientists have published computational results that may give drug designers the insight they need to develop the next generation of effective influenza treatment.

ASCO Recap: Leaning in at the Plate, Swinging for the Fences

June 17, 2014 1:57 pm | by Neil Canavan | Articles | Comments

Everyone loves a grand slam: the crack of the bat, the arc of the ball as it sails over the fence, a tip of the batter’s cap, a triumphal trot around as the bases empty out, but really, it’s the lesser efforts that made it all possible—a double, a single, a walk—it’s the incremental gains that win the game. It’s called Small Ball. This year’s ASCO, absent the heavy hitters, was all about the small ball.

Discovery May Lead to Improvements in Diagnosing, Treating Alzheimer's Disease

June 16, 2014 1:51 pm | News | Comments

A new drug target to fight Alzheimer's disease has been discovered by a research team led by Gong Chen, a professor of biology and the Verne M. Willaman Chair in Life Sciences at Penn State. The discovery also has potential for development as a novel diagnostic tool for Alzheimer's disease.

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Experimental Drug Targets Skin, Lung Cancers

June 4, 2014 1:55 pm | News | Comments

Researchers are reporting promising treatment milestones for patients with deadly skin and lung cancers who are being treated with an experimental drug called MK-3475.                        

Steroids Prescribed in ICU Linked to Delirium

May 27, 2014 2:15 pm | News | Comments

New research suggests that critically ill patients receiving steroids in a hospital’s intensive care unit (ICU) are significantly more likely to develop delirium. Results of the study suggest minimizing the use of steroids could reduce delirium in the ICU.

Food-Disinfecting Method May Fight Drug-Resistant Bacteria

May 27, 2014 2:11 pm | News | Comments

Technology currently used to disinfect food may help solve one of the most challenging problems in medicine today: the proliferation of bacteria resistant to antibiotics and other antimicrobial drugs.               

New Target Found for Chronic Pain Treatment

May 22, 2014 1:57 pm | News | Comments

Researchers have found a new target for treating chronic pain: an enzyme called PIP5K1C. The research shows that PIP5K1C controls the activity of cellular receptors that signal pain.                   

Printing Replacements

May 22, 2014 1:44 pm | by Robert Fee, Editor-in-Chief, Bioscience Technology | Articles | Comments

3-D printing promises to revolutionize engineering, and many speculate that it could have a huge impact on medicine, too. Many speculate that useful organs grown in the lab three-dimensionally on scaffolds is now closer to fact than fiction.

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Neutron Beams Reveal How Antibodies Cluster in Solution

May 20, 2014 2:00 pm | News | Comments

Results from neutron spin-echo analysis are an important advance towards enabling subcutaneous injections of concentrated biopharmaceuticals used to treat cancer and autoimmune disorders (e.g. arthritis, multiple sclerosis). The insights obtained could help drug companies reduce the viscosity and mitigate phase separation in injectable biopharmaceuticals.

Measles Vaccine Can Kill Multiple Myeloma Cells

May 15, 2014 11:00 am | Videos | Comments

In a proof-of-principle clinical trial, researchers have demonstrated that virotherapy— destroying cancer with a virus that infects and kills cancer cells but spares normal tissues— can be effective against the deadly cancer multiple myeloma.   

Anti-Depressant Reduces Alzheimer’s Plaque Growth by 78 Percent

May 14, 2014 2:03 pm | by Cynthia Fox | Articles | Comments

A common antidepressant can dramatically halt growth of Alzheimer’s plaque. A team from Missouri and Pennsylvania report today in Science Translational Medicine this reduction occurs in both humans and mice. It gives the drug, the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) citalopram, a possible future role as a prophylactic—the first in Alzheimer’s Disease (AD), if bigger studies are supportive.

ED Drug Restores Blood Flow in Muscular Dystrophy

May 8, 2014 1:45 pm | News | Comments

Researchers have found that a commonly prescribed drug restores blood flow to oxygen-starved muscles of boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy, a genetic muscle-wasting disease.                     

MERS Experts Working on Way to Block Virus

May 6, 2014 12:45 pm | News | Comments

A team of researchers is creating molecules designed to shut down the Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus, or MERS-CoV, that recently arrived in the United States.                       

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Researchers ID Potential New Strategy to Treat Ovarian Cancer

April 28, 2014 1:33 pm | News | Comments

Scientists studying cancerous tumor tissues in a laboratory believe they have identified a potential new strategy to treat ovarian cancer by targeting ovarian tumor growth through the inhibition of the development of new tumor blood vessels.   

Statins May Lead Some Patients to Pig Out

April 24, 2014 9:20 pm | by Lindsey Tanner - AP Medical Writer | News | Comments

Ten years of U.S. data suggest that calorie and fat intake increased among statin users during the decade, an indication that many patients might be abandoning heart-healthy lifestyles and assuming that drugs alone will do the trick, the study authors said.

Gene Determines If Aspirin Can Lower Colon Cancer Risk

April 24, 2014 1:00 pm | News | Comments

The humble aspirin may have just added another beneficial effect beyond its ability to ameliorate headaches and reduce the risk of heart attacks: lowering colon cancer risk among people with high levels of a specific type of gene.     

Fast Way to Measure DNA Repair

April 22, 2014 2:57 pm | News | Comments

A team of researchers has developed a test that can rapidly assess several DNA repair systems, which could help determine individuals’ risk of developing cancer and help doctors predict how a given patient will respond to chemotherapy drugs.   

'Molecular Tweezer' is a Step Toward Parkinson’s Treatment

April 21, 2014 2:43 pm | Videos | Comments

The most effective way to tackle debilitating diseases is to punch them at the start and keep them from growing. Research shows that a small “molecular tweezer” keeps proteins from clumping, the first step of disorders such as Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease and Huntington’s disease.

Drawing a Ring Around Antiviral Immunity

April 15, 2014 11:37 am | News | Comments

If you follow cancer biology, then you’ve probably heard of ubiquitin before. In a recent paper researchers provided a structural rationale for how ubiquitin helps RIG-I do its job— and how that might help keep the immune system from getting out of hand.

Regenerating Muscle in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy: Age Matters

April 14, 2014 1:50 pm | News | Comments

A team of scientists published details of how a class of drugs called “HDACis” drive muscle-cell regeneration in the early stages of dystrophic muscles, but fail to work in late stages. The findings are key to furthering clinical development of HDACis for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), an incurable muscle-wasting disease.

US Jury Hits Takeda, Eli Lilly with $9B Penalty

April 8, 2014 9:19 am | by Yuri Kageyama - AP Business Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

A U.S. jury ordered Japanese drugmaker Takeda Pharmaceutical Co. and its U.S. counterpart, Eli Lilly and Co., to pay $9 billion in punitive damages over a diabetes medicine linked to cancer. The drug companies said Tuesday they will "vigorously challenge" the decision. The U.S District Court in western Louisiana ordered a $6 billion penalty for Takeda and $3 billion for its business partner and co-defendant Eli Lilly.

Caffeine Can Target Tau Deposits in Alzheimer's

April 7, 2014 12:33 pm | News | Comments

A research team was able to demonstrate for the first time that caffeine has a positive effect on tau deposits in Alzheimer's disease. Tau deposits, along with beta-amyloid plaques, are among the characteristic features of Alzheimer's disease. 

FDA OKs 1st Hay Fever Allergy Immunotherapy Tablet

April 2, 2014 12:20 pm | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved the first tablet for gradually reducing hay fever allergy symptoms, an alternative to uncomfortable allergy-desensitizing shots. Oralair, a tablet that dissolves quickly under the tongue, is approved for patients aged 10 through 65. It's to be...

Using Light-Heated Water to Deliver Drugs

April 1, 2014 2:25 pm | News | Comments

Researchers from the University of California, San Diego Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, in collaboration with materials scientists, engineers and neurobiologists, have discovered a new mechanism for using light to activate drug-delivering nanoparticles and other targeted therapeutic substances inside the body.

Tamiflu-resistant Influenza: Parsing the Genome for the Culprits

March 31, 2014 2:43 pm | News | Comments

It doesn’t take long for the flu virus to outsmart Tamiflu. EPFL scientists have developed a tool that reveals the mutations that make the virus resistant, and they have identified new mutations that may render ineffective one of the few treatments currently available on the market.

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