Advertisement
Neuroscience
Subscribe to Neuroscience
View Sample

FREE Email Newsletter

As Subdural Hematomas Increase, so do Brain Growth Studies

April 17, 2015 2:47 pm | by Cynthia Fox, Science Writer | Articles | Comments

There will be 60,000 annual cases of chronic subdural hematoma (SDH) by 2030, making SDH the U.S.’s most common adult brain surgery disorder, says a new study by New York University (NYU) researchers.

Encountering a Wall Corrects 'GPS' Cells in Mouse Brains

April 17, 2015 10:20 am | by Stanford University | News | Comments

Researchers have found more evidence that the brain’s grid cells help a mouse mentally map its location in the dark.

Income and Brain Anatomy

April 17, 2015 9:52 am | by Anne Trafton, MIT | News | Comments

In middle-schoolers, neuroscientists find differences in brain structures where knowledge is stored.

Advertisement

Fitness Trackers Could Support MS Treatments: Study

April 16, 2015 3:13 pm | by Ryan Bushey, Associate Editor | Articles | Comments

The team of investigators will present their findings this week at the annual American Academy of Neurology meeting.

Open Road to the Circuit Diagram of the Brain

April 16, 2015 10:29 am | by Max Planck Institute | News | Comments

Staining method brings the reconstruction of all nerve cells and their connections within reach.

Scientists Use Brain Stimulation to Boost Creativity

April 16, 2015 10:17 am | by UNC | News | Comments

Using a weak electric current to alter a specific brain activity pattern, UNC School of Medicine researchers increased creativity in healthy adults. Now they’re testing the same experimental protocol to alleviate symptoms in people with depression.

Inadequate Vitamin E May Damage Brain

April 15, 2015 9:52 am | by Oregon State University | News | Comments

Researchers at Oregon State University have discovered how vitamin E deficiency may cause neurological damage by interrupting a supply line of specific nutrients and robbing the brain of the “building blocks” it needs to maintain neuronal health.

A New Tool for Understanding ALS: Patients’ Brain Cells

April 15, 2015 9:34 am | by Johns Hopkins | News | Comments

Researchers at Johns Hopkins Medicine have transformed skin cells from patients with Lou Gehrig’s disease, or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), into brain cells affected by the progressive, fatal disease and deposited those human-made cells into the first public ALS cell library, enabling scientists to better study the disease.

Advertisement

How Deep-Brain Stimulation Reshapes Neural Circuits in Parkinson’s

April 14, 2015 10:28 am | by UCSF | News | Comments

Study reveals mode of action of highly effective, but poorly understood therapy.

Network “Hubs” in the Brain Attract Information, Much Like Airport System

April 14, 2015 10:18 am | by University of Michigan | News | Comments

One of the brain’s main jobs is information processing – what is critical, however, is that information in the brain gets transferred to the right places at the right times.

Getting Bigger Brains Through Exercise

April 14, 2015 10:08 am | by Bioscience Technology Staff | Articles | Comments

The brain gets bigger with physical exercise, according to two recent studies.

New Compound Could Offer Therapy for Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s

April 14, 2015 9:15 am | by Bevin Fletcher, Associate Editor | Articles | Comments

An international research team has developed a compound that successfully targets and destroys aggregated proteins, leading to hopes for a new class of drugs effective against a multitude of diseases including Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s.

Touch-Sensing Neurons Are Multitaskers

April 13, 2015 10:51 am | by Johns Hopkins | News | Comments

Two types of touch information — the feel of an object and the position of an animal’s limb — have long been thought to flow into the brain via different channels and be integrated in sophisticated processing regions. Now, with help from a specially devised mechanical exoskeleton that positioned monkeys’ hands in different postures, Johns Hopkins researchers have challenged that view.

Advertisement

Dreams and REM Sleep May Be About Memory Consolidation

April 13, 2015 8:39 am | by Cynthia Fox, Science Writer | Articles | Comments

Rapid Eye Movement (REM) sleep, during which vivid dreaming occurs, may be a period in which memory is consolidated, according to research in Science Advances.

Study Deciphers the Noise in the Human Brain

April 10, 2015 9:16 am | by Bruce Goldman, Stanford University | News | Comments

Electrical recordings directly from the human brain show remarkable precision in the coordination of widely distributed regions involved in memory recall, at rest and during sleep.

Study Links Rates of ADHD to Altitude

April 8, 2015 10:24 am | by University of Utah | News | Comments

Recent research has linked the thin air of higher elevations to increased rates of depression and suicide. But a new study shows there’s also good news from up in the aspens and pines: The prevalence of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) decreases substantially as altitude increases.

Functional Brain Organization of Newborns Altered By Prenatal Cocaine Exposure

April 8, 2015 9:54 am | by UNC | News | Comments

A new study of newborns with prenatal drug exposure finds cocaine-specific disruptions in a part of the brain circuitry thought to play an important role in arousal regulation.

Study Reveals Internet-like Networks in Cerebral Cortex of Rats

April 7, 2015 10:29 am | by Robert Perkins, University of Southern California | News | Comments

A four-decade analysis of brain studies generates new insight, perhaps changing the way scientists view its architecture.

Broken Cellular Communication in Brain Contributes to Huntington's Disease Symptoms, Study Finds

April 7, 2015 10:10 am | by Indiana University | News | Comments

Indiana University researchers have found that broken communication in a specific part of the brain plays a role in the involuntary physical movements that affect individuals with Huntington's disease.

Brain's 'Lowly' Visual Processor Is More Sophisticated Than Once Thought

April 7, 2015 9:30 am | by Johns Hopkins | News | Comments

Primary visual cortex can inform decision-making

Diagnosis By Keyboard

April 2, 2015 9:42 am | by Anne Trafton, MIT | News | Comments

By revealing loss of motor skills, typing patterns may help to identify early onset of Parkinson’s.

Experimental Cancer Drug Restores Memory in Mouse Model of Alzheimer’s

April 1, 2015 11:07 am | by Bill Hathaway, Yale University | News | Comments

Memory and as well as connections between brain cells were restored in mice with a model of Alzheimer’s given an experimental cancer drug.

Intelligent Neuroprostheses Mimic Natural Motor Control

March 31, 2015 4:22 pm | by Cognitive Neuroscience Society | News | Comments

Neuroscientists are taking inspiration from natural motor control to design new prosthetic devices that can better replace limb function. In new work, researchers have tested a range of brain-controlled devices - from wheelchairs to robots to advanced limbs - that work with their users to intelligently perform tasks.

Researchers Build Brain-Machine Interface to Control Prosthetic Hand

March 31, 2015 4:13 pm | by University of Houston | News | Comments

A research team from the University of Houston has created an algorithm that allowed a man to grasp a bottle and other objects with a prosthetic hand, powered only by his thoughts.

Body’s Good Fat Tissue Communicates With Brain Through Sensory Nerves

March 27, 2015 3:50 pm | by Georgia State University | News | Comments

Brown fat tissue, the body’s “good fat,” communicates with the brain through sensory nerves, possibly sharing information that is important for fighting human obesity, such as how much fat we have and how much fat we’ve lost.

X
You may login with either your assigned username or your e-mail address.
The password field is case sensitive.
Loading