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'Still Alice' Highlighting Often Hidden Toll of Alzheimer's

February 2, 2015 2:14 pm | by Lauran Neergard - AP Medical Writer | News | Comments

The movie "Still Alice" is raising awareness of a disease too often suffered in isolation, even if the Hollywood face is younger than the typical real-life patient.                           

Decoding Sugar Addiction

January 29, 2015 2:33 pm | by MIT | News | Comments

Researchers have shown that inhibiting a previously unknown brain circuit that regulates compulsive sugar consumption does not interfere with healthy eating.                 

Exploring Upper Motor Neuron Degeneration in ALS

January 28, 2015 3:00 pm | by Nora Dunne, Northwestern University | News | Comments

For the first time, scientists have revealed a mechanism underlying the cellular degeneration of upper motor neurons, a small group of neurons in the brain recently shown to play a major role in ALS pathology.         

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Harvard's Odyssey Unlocks Big Data

January 28, 2015 2:40 pm | by Harvard Gazette | News | Comments

As technology evolves and becomes further integrated into society, massive amounts of data are being collected and stored.                       

Longevity Gene Variant Discovery

January 28, 2015 10:36 am | by UCSF | News | Comments

People who carry a variant of a gene that is associated with longevity also have larger volumes in a front part of the brain involved in planning and decision-making, according to researchers at UC San Francisco.                                      

Research Shows Infants Can Remember More Than Originally Thought

January 26, 2015 9:41 am | by Jenna Eckel, Penn State | News | Comments

This discovery is different from previous research that found an infant would experience “catastrophic forgetting” once their memory capacity is exceeded.                  

The Molecular Biology Behind ALS

January 23, 2015 4:58 pm | by Brandeis Univ. | News | Comments

By now, most everyone has seen videos all over social media of friends and family dousing themselves in ice cold water as part of the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge.                                                 

Why Protein Mutations Lead to Parkinson's Disease

January 22, 2015 4:29 pm | by UCSD | News | Comments

A new study has shown for the first time why protein mutations lead to the familial form of Parkinson’s disease.                         

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Study Finds Videos Can Help Infants Learn Communication Skills

January 22, 2015 4:20 pm | by Emory University | News | Comments

Children under two years old can learn certain communication skills from a video.                              

Moving Closer to a Personalized Treatment Solution for Intellectual Disability

January 22, 2015 10:36 am | by Scripps Research Institute | News | Comments

Scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have produced an approach that protects animal models against a type of genetic disruption that causes intellectual disability, including serious memory impairments and altered anxiety levels.

Video-based Therapy May Benefit Babies at Risk of Autism

January 22, 2015 10:14 am | by University of Manchester | News | Comments

Researchers at The University of Manchester have, for the first time, shown that video-based therapy for families with babies at risk of autism improves infants’ engagement, attention and social behaviour, and might reduce the likelihood of such children developing later autism.

The Ups and Downs of the Seemingly Idle Brain

January 21, 2015 9:16 am | by Brown University | News | Comments

A new study probed deep into this somewhat mysterious cycle in mice, to learn more about how the mammalian brain accomplishes it.                      

Researchers Find Novel Signaling Pathway Involved in Appetite Control

January 20, 2015 3:33 pm | by Tim Stephens - UC Santa Cruz | News | Comments

A new study has revealed important details of a molecular signaling system in the brain that is involved in the control of body weight and metabolism.                   

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New Fibers Can Deliver Many Simultaneous Stimuli

January 20, 2015 3:22 pm | by David L. Chandler - MIT | News | Comments

The human brain’s complexity makes it extremely challenging to study.                                

Researchers Discover 'Idiosyncratic' Brain Patterns in Autism

January 20, 2015 10:42 am | by Carnegie Mellon | News | Comments

Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) has been studied for many years, but there are still many more questions than answers. For example, some research into the brain functions of individuals with autism spectrum have found a lack of synchronization ('connectivity') between different parts of the brain that normally work in tandem.

Genetic Clues Found in Fragile X Syndrome

January 16, 2015 2:09 pm | by Julia Evangelou Strait, Washington University in St. Louis | News | Comments

Scientists have gained new insight into fragile X syndrome — the most common cause of inherited intellectual disability.                        

Depression, Behavioral Changes May Precede Memory Loss in Alzheimer's

January 16, 2015 10:09 am | by Washington University in St. Louis | News | Comments

Depression and behavioral changes may occur before memory declines in people who will go on to develop Alzheimer’s disease, according to new research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.                                  

Paradox: Cues Associated with Infant Abuse May Help Reduce Stress in Adult Brain

January 15, 2015 9:44 am | by NYU Langone | News | Comments

Neurobiologists at NYU Langone Medical Center and elsewhere have found a surprising and paradoxical effect of abuse-related cues in rat pups: those cues  also can lower depressive-like behavior when the rat pups are fully grown.                               

3-D Facial Imaging May Aid in Early Detection of Autism

January 14, 2015 4:18 pm | by University of Missouri | News | Comments

Early detection of autism in children is the key for treatments to be most effective and produce the best outcomes.                        

What the Nose Knows

January 13, 2015 10:23 am | by CSHL | News | Comments

The nose, of course, knows nothing. The information we gather from the basic odor-detection task performed by molecular receptors in the nose needs to be processed in the brain’s olfactory bulb and olfactory cortex in order for us to make sense of an odor and glean what we need to know to take action. 

Mechanism Insights Into SMA Suggest New Treatment Paths

January 13, 2015 10:07 am | by CSHL | News | Comments

A team of researchers from Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL) sheds new light on the underlying pathology of spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), a rare but devastating disease that causes muscle weakness and paralysis and is the leading genetic cause of infant deaths. The newly obtained insights may prove valuable as scientists currently work to define optimal treatment strategies for patients.

Mutation Maps

January 13, 2015 9:52 am | News | Comments

DNA sequences were once thought to be identical from cell to cell, but it’s increasingly understood that mutations can arise during brain development that affect only certain groups of brain cells.                                          

Virtual Reality vs. Real Life: How Brain Neurons Light Up

January 12, 2015 8:56 am | by Cynthia Fox, Science Writer | Articles | Comments

Space-mapping brain neurons do not “light up” in scans when exposed to the virtual reality (VR) at work in kids’ video games, the way they do in the “real world.” The neurons—found in the hippocampus—only mirror the “reality” state some 50 percent of the time.

Brains Keep Memories Tidy By Pruning Innacurate Ones

January 12, 2015 8:52 am | by Princeton University | News | Comments

New research shows that the human brain uses memories to make predictions about what it expects to find in familiar contexts.                       

Sounding Out Speech

January 12, 2015 8:42 am | by Peter Reuell. Harvard Gazette | News | Comments

Among the thorniest challenges in the study of speech perception, the invariance problem was first identified in the 1950s, when scientists began using instruments to analyze spoken language.            

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