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Study Replicates Human Brain-to-brain Connection

November 6, 2014 1:03 pm | Videos | Comments

Researchers have successfully replicated a direct brain-to-brain connection between pairs of people as part of a scientific study following the team’s initial demonstration a year ago.                   

Magnetic Pulses Could Treat Autism

November 4, 2014 3:17 pm | News | Comments

New research shows that using rTMS, a new type of brain stimulation, can improve some of the abnormalities in brain activity of patients with autism spectrum disorder (ASD).                       

Alzheimer's Development Theory Debunked

November 3, 2014 1:22 pm | News | Comments

New research dramatically alters the prevailing theory of how Alzheimer’s disease develops. The research also helps explains why some people with plaque buildup in their brains don’t develop dementia, and shows the potential of a cancer drug to combat the disease.

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Height Linked to Dementia Risk

November 3, 2014 12:58 pm | News | Comments

People who are shorter than average height have an increased risk of dying with dementia, a study has found. Researchers examined several health studies of the general population, which recorded health information such as blood pressure, height, weight and risk factors for ill health.

Study IDs Possible Target to Treat Cocaine Addiction

October 31, 2014 12:07 pm | News | Comments

A new study has identified a potential target for therapies to treat cocaine addiction. Investigators found evidence that changing one amino acid in a subunit of an important receptor protein alters whether cocaine-experienced animals will resume drug seeking after a period of cocaine abstinence.

PET Scan for Psychotherapy

October 31, 2014 11:56 am | News | Comments

A study has identified for the first time changes in the metabolic activity of a key brain region in patients successfully treated for depression with psychodynamic psychotherapy.                     

Revealing the Root Causes of Alzheimer’s, Other Diseases

October 31, 2014 11:43 am | News | Comments

In the 1980s, researchers discovered vaults, naturally occurring nanoparticles that are composed mostly of proteins and number in the thousands inside every cell of the body. Now, data suggests that polyribosomes work like 3-D printers to both create and link together proteins and correctly form them into vaults.

The Man with a Thousand Brains

October 31, 2014 11:13 am | News | Comments

Forty million people worldwide are living with Alzheimer’s and this is only set to increase. But tiny brains grown in culture could help scientists learn more about this mysterious disease– and test new drugs.            

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Why Scratching Makes You Itch More

October 31, 2014 10:57 am | Videos | Comments

Turns out your mom was right: Scratching an itch only makes it worse. New research from scientists indicates that scratching causes the brain to release serotonin, which intensifies the itch sensation.              

Video Game Study Shows Sleep Apnea May Affect Memory

October 30, 2014 2:30 pm | News | Comments

Sleep apnea may affect your ability to form new spatial memories, such as remembering where you parked your car, new research suggests. The study demonstrates through the playing of a specific video game that disruption of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep as a consequence of sleep apnea impairs spatial memory.

Dozens of New Autism Genes Identified

October 30, 2014 11:10 am | News | Comments

Two major genetic studies of autism have newly implicated dozens of genes in the disorder. The research shows that rare mutations in these genes affect communication networks in the brain and compromise fundamental biological mechanisms.    

Wisconsin Studies Music and Memory Program

October 30, 2014 10:56 am | by Carrie Antlfinger - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

Mike Knutson taught himself to play the harmonica as a child, and the 96-year-old sang with his family for most of his life. Even now, as he suffers from dementia, music is an important part of his life— thanks to a study looking at the impact of a nationwide music program aimed at helping dementia patients.

Investigating the Remarkable Memory of 'SuperAgers'

October 29, 2014 11:30 am | News | Comments

In 2012, scientists captured national attention by identifying for the first time a group of people over 80 with remarkable, age-defying memory power. Now, the same scientists will continue studying these “SuperAgers” to find out how they resist cognitive decline.  

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Blood Test Could Diagnose Early-onset Alzheimer’s

October 29, 2014 10:58 am | News | Comments

A non-invasive blood test that could diagnose early-onset Alzheimer’s disease (AD) with increased accuracy has been developed by researchers. The new early-detection blood test could predict these changes and a person’s risk of developing AD much earlier than is currently possible.

Heart Drug Helps Treat ALS in Mice

October 27, 2014 2:31 pm | News | Comments

Digoxin, a medication used in the treatment of heart failure, may be adaptable for the treatment of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a progressive, paralyzing disease, suggests new research.                  

Dietary Flavanols Reverse Age-related Memory Decline

October 27, 2014 2:26 pm | Videos | Comments

Dietary cocoa flavanols—naturally occurring bioactives found in cocoa—reversed age-related memory decline in healthy older adults, according to a new study.                           

Researchers Observe Brain Development in Utero

October 27, 2014 2:03 pm | Videos | Comments

New investigation methods using functional magnetic resonance tomography (fMRT) offer insights into fetal brain development. These in vivo observations will uncover different stages of the brain's development.              

Proteins Direct Precursors of Pyramidal Cells to Their Destination

October 24, 2014 11:26 am | News | Comments

Researchers have now discovered that FLRT proteins on the surface of progenitor cells can induce repellent and attractant signals depending on its binding partner.                         

Brain Remains Stable During Learning, Model Shows

October 24, 2014 10:28 am | News | Comments

Complex biochemical signals that coordinate fast and slow changes in neuronal networks keep the brain in balance during learning, according to an international team of scientists.                     

New ALS-associated Gene Identified

October 23, 2014 12:33 pm | News | Comments

Using an innovative exome sequencing strategy, a team of international scientists has shown that TUBA4A, the gene encoding the Tubulin Alpha 4A protein, is associated with familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS).         

Tackling Blindness, Deafness Through Neuroengineering

October 22, 2014 2:26 pm | News | Comments

The Bertarelli Program in Translational Neuroscience and Neuroengineering, a collaborative program between Harvard Medical School and the École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL) in Switzerland, has announced a new set of grants worth $3.6 million for five research projects.

Childhood Autism Linked to Air Toxics

October 22, 2014 2:13 pm | News | Comments

Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) were more likely to have been exposed to higher levels of certain air toxics during their mothers’ pregnancies and the first two years of life compared to children without the condition, according to a new study.

Skin Cells Reprogrammed Directly into Brain Cells

October 22, 2014 1:30 pm | News | Comments

Scientists have described a way to convert human skin cells directly into a specific type of brain cell affected by Huntington’s disease, an ultimately fatal neurodegenerative disorder.                   

See-through Sensors Open New Window into the Brain

October 21, 2014 11:18 am | News | Comments

Developing invisible implantable medical sensor arrays, a team of engineers has overcome a major technological hurdle in researchers’ efforts to understand the brain.                         

Tarantula Venom Illuminates Electrical Activity in Live Cells

October 21, 2014 11:01 am | Videos | Comments

Researchers have created a cellular probe that combines a tarantula toxin with a fluorescent compound to help scientists observe electrical activity in neurons and other cells.                     

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