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Applying Proteomics to Parkinson’s

October 3, 2014 12:15 pm | News | Comments

Scientists studying two genes that are mutated in an early-onset form of Parkinson’s disease have deciphered how normal versions of these genes collaborate to help rid cells of damaged mitochondria.               

Predicting Abstract Judgments from Brain Waves

October 2, 2014 2:44 pm | News | Comments

People make immediate judgments about images they are shown, which could impact on their decisions, even before their brains have had time to consciously process the information, a study of brainwaves has found.            

Schizophrenia, Bipolar Disorder Linked to Dendritic Spine Loss in Brain

October 2, 2014 2:32 pm | News | Comments

Schizophrenia and bipolar disorder both appear to be associated with dendritic spine loss in the brain, according to a new study, which suggests that the two distinct disorders may share common pathophysiological features.        

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Research Explores New Possibilities for Epilepsy Treatment

October 1, 2014 3:34 pm | News | Comments

Ongoing research is investigating the connection between initial seizures and the onset of epilepsy later in life. Nearly one in 10 Americans will experience an initial seizure, but only 3 percent of those who experience a seizure will go on to develop epilepsy.

Omega-3 Fatty Acids May Prevent Some Forms of Depression

October 1, 2014 3:29 pm | News | Comments

Omega-3 fatty acids, more commonly known as fish oil, have a long list of health benefits, including lowering the risk of heart disease and reducing triglyceride levels. These nutritional compounds are also known to have anti-depressant and anti-inflammatory properties.

Memory Loss Associated with Alzheimer's Reversed for First Time

October 1, 2014 3:24 pm | News | Comments

In the first small study of a novel, personalized and comprehensive program to reverse memory loss, nine of 10 participants displayed subjective or objective improvement in their memories.                   

Lift Weights, Improve Your Memory

October 1, 2014 1:29 pm | Videos | Comments

Here’s another reason why it’s a good idea to hit the gym: it can improve memory. A new study shows that an intense workout of as little as 20 minutes can enhance episodic memory, also known as long-term memory for previous events, by about 10 percent in healthy young adults.

Scientists Discover Gene Controlling Muscle Fate

September 30, 2014 2:11 pm | News | Comments

Scientists have moved a step closer to improving medical science through research involving muscle manipulation of fruit flies. They discovered in the flight muscles of Drosophila a new regulator of a process called alternative splicing.     

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Modeling Shockwaves Through the Brain

September 30, 2014 2:00 pm | News | Comments

Researchers have developed a scaling law that predicts a human’s risk of brain injury, based on previous studies of blasts’ effects on animal brains. The method may help the military develop more protective helmets, as well as aid clinicians in diagnosing traumatic brain injury.

NIH Awards Initial $46M for BRAIN Initiative Research

September 30, 2014 1:51 pm | News | Comments

The National Institutes of Health announced today its first wave of investments totaling $46 million in fiscal year 14 funds to support the goals of the Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies (BRAIN) Initiative.     

BST This Week #20: Dengue-blocking Mosquito Released in Brazil

September 30, 2014 10:26 am | Videos | Comments

On this episode of Bioscience Technology This Week, Christina Jakubowski covers mosquitoes infected with a dengue-blocking bacteria that have been released in Brazil. Our second story highlights new research that has restored natural walking ability in completely paralyzed rats.

Scientists Identify Signature of Aging in the Brain

September 29, 2014 1:14 pm | News | Comments

How the brain ages is still largely an open question– in part because this organ is mostly insulated from direct contact with other systems in the body, including the blood and immune systems. Now, new research may have found evidence of a unique “signature” that may be the “missing link” between cognitive decline and aging.

Protein that Causes Frontotemporal Dementia also Implicated in Alzheimer’s

September 29, 2014 12:56 pm | News | Comments

Researchers have shown that low levels of the protein progranulin in the brain can increase the formation of amyloid-beta plaques (a hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease), cause neuroinflammation, and worsen memory deficits in a mouse model of this condition.

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At Least Two Regions of the Brain Decide What We Perceive

September 26, 2014 8:30 am | News | Comments

Tests on the brains of macaques have shown that neurons in at least two regions of the brain, the temporal and frontal lobes, are responsible for deciding which impressions reach our consciousness.                

Alzheimer's Patients Can Feel the Emotion After the Memories Have Vanished

September 26, 2014 8:30 am | News | Comments

A new study further supports an inescapable message: caregivers have a profound influence— good or bad— on the emotional state of individuals with Alzheimer’s disease.                       

First Mouse Model for ALS Dementia Developed

September 25, 2014 8:30 am | News | Comments

The first animal model for ALS dementia, a form of ALS that also damages the brain, has been developed by scientists. The advance will allow researchers to directly see the brains of living mice, under anesthesia, at the microscopic level.   

Think You Have Alzheimer's? You May Be Right

September 25, 2014 8:30 am | News | Comments

New research suggests that people who notice their memory is slipping may be on to something. The research appears to confirm that self-reported memory complaints are strong predictors of clinical memory impairment later in life.      

BST This Week #18: Brain Test May Improve Autism Diagnosis

September 24, 2014 4:07 pm | Videos | Comments

On this episode of Bioscience Technology This Week, Christina Jakubowski covers research showing that measuring the brain’s response to sights and sounds can help in classifying people on the autism spectrum. Our second story looks at how the human response to unfairness may have involved in support of long-term cooperation.

Infant Cooing, Babbling Linked to Hearing Ability

September 24, 2014 3:45 pm | News | Comments

Infants’ vocalizations throughout the first year follow a set of predictable steps from crying and cooing to forming syllables and first words. New research shows that infant vocalizations are primarily motivated by infants’ ability to hear their own babbling. 

Breaking News: Multitasking May Change Brain Structure

September 24, 2014 2:06 pm | News | Comments

Simultaneously using mobile phones, laptops and other media devices could be changing the structure of our brains, according to new research.                               

Consumption of Fruits, Veggies May Keep the Blues Away

September 23, 2014 2:33 pm | News | Comments

A new study focused on mental well-being found that high and low mental well-being were consistently associated with an individual’s fruit and vegetable consumption.                          

Presence or Absence of Early Language Delay Alters Brain Anatomy in Autism

September 23, 2014 1:39 pm | News | Comments

Individual differences in early language development, and in later language functioning, are associated with changes in the anatomy of the brain in autism. A new study has found that a common characteristic of autism– language delay in early childhood– leaves a "signature" in the brain.

Blood Test May Help Determine Psychosis Risk

September 22, 2014 11:56 am | News | Comments

A new study reports preliminary results showing that a blood test, when used in psychiatric patients experiencing symptoms that are considered to be indicators of a high risk for psychosis, identifies those who later went on to develop psychosis. 

Western Diet Leads to Diminished Cognitive Performance

September 22, 2014 11:40 am | by Rob Payne, ScienceNetwork WA | News | Comments

Researchers found that participants with a western dietary pattern scored lower in cognitive tasks, particularly those involving reaction time/psychomotor function, visual attention, learning and memory.              

BST This Week #17: Film Detects Consciousness in Vegetative State

September 19, 2014 8:30 am | Videos | Comments

On this episode of Bioscience Technology This Week, Christina Jakubowski focuses on a new study that used a short movie to detect consciousness in vegetative state patients. Our second story explores how the amazing variety in human faces is the result of evolutionary pressure.

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