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Scientists Find More DNA and Extra Copies of Disease Gene in Alzheimer's Brain Cells

February 4, 2015 3:02 pm | by The Scripps Research Institute | News | Comments

Scientists have found diverse genomic changes in single neurons from the brains of Alzheimer’s patients, pointing to an unexpected factor that may underpin the most common form of the disease.            

Stem Cell Therapy Shows Promise for MS Patients

February 4, 2015 2:41 pm | by Nora Dunne, Northwestern University | News | Comments

A preliminary study suggests stem cell transplantation may reverse disability and improve quality of life for patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis.                

How the Brain Ignores Distractions

February 4, 2015 10:23 am | by Brown Univ. | News | Comments

By scanning the brains of people engaged in selective attention to sensations, researchers have learned how the brain appears to coordinate the response needed to ignore distractors. They are now studying whether that ability can be harnessed, for instance to suppress pain.  

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Protein Threshold Linked to Parkinson’s Disease

February 4, 2015 10:09 am | by Johns Hopkins | News | Comments

The circumstances in which a protein closely associated with Parkinson’s Disease begins to malfunction and aggregate in the brain have been pinpointed in a quantitative manner for the first time in a new study.                                      

Protective Brain Protein Reveals Gender Implications for Autism, Alzheimer's Research

February 3, 2015 12:56 pm | by Tel Aviv University | News | Comments

A new study by Tel Aviv University's Prof. Illana Gozes, published in Translational Psychiatry, may offer insight into the pathology of both autism and Alzheimer's by revealing that different activities of certain proteins in males and females cause gender-specific tendencies toward these diseases.    

New 'Reset' Button Discovered for Circadian Clock

February 2, 2015 3:01 pm | by David Salisbury - Vanderbilt University | News | Comments

The discovery of a new reset button for the brain’s master biological clock could eventually lead to new treatments for conditions like seasonal affective disorder, reduce the adverse health effects of working the night shift and possibly even treat jet lag. 

Illusion Aids Understanding of Autism

February 2, 2015 2:48 pm | by Monash University | News | Comments

New research could lead to a better understanding of how the brain works in people with autism.                                               

Face Blindness Predicted by Structural Differences in Brain

February 2, 2015 2:35 pm | by Leslie Willoughby - Stanford University | News | Comments

Recognizing the faces of family and friends seems vital to social interaction.                                                   

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'Still Alice' Highlighting Often Hidden Toll of Alzheimer's

February 2, 2015 2:14 pm | by Lauran Neergard - AP Medical Writer | News | Comments

The movie "Still Alice" is raising awareness of a disease too often suffered in isolation, even if the Hollywood face is younger than the typical real-life patient.                           

Decoding Sugar Addiction

January 29, 2015 2:33 pm | by MIT | News | Comments

Researchers have shown that inhibiting a previously unknown brain circuit that regulates compulsive sugar consumption does not interfere with healthy eating.                 

Exploring Upper Motor Neuron Degeneration in ALS

January 28, 2015 3:00 pm | by Nora Dunne, Northwestern University | News | Comments

For the first time, scientists have revealed a mechanism underlying the cellular degeneration of upper motor neurons, a small group of neurons in the brain recently shown to play a major role in ALS pathology.         

Harvard's Odyssey Unlocks Big Data

January 28, 2015 2:40 pm | by Harvard Gazette | News | Comments

As technology evolves and becomes further integrated into society, massive amounts of data are being collected and stored.                       

Longevity Gene Variant Discovery

January 28, 2015 10:36 am | by UCSF | News | Comments

People who carry a variant of a gene that is associated with longevity also have larger volumes in a front part of the brain involved in planning and decision-making, according to researchers at UC San Francisco.                                      

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Research Shows Infants Can Remember More Than Originally Thought

January 26, 2015 9:41 am | by Jenna Eckel, Penn State | News | Comments

This discovery is different from previous research that found an infant would experience “catastrophic forgetting” once their memory capacity is exceeded.                  

The Molecular Biology Behind ALS

January 23, 2015 4:58 pm | by Brandeis Univ. | News | Comments

By now, most everyone has seen videos all over social media of friends and family dousing themselves in ice cold water as part of the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge.                                                 

Why Protein Mutations Lead to Parkinson's Disease

January 22, 2015 4:29 pm | by UCSD | News | Comments

A new study has shown for the first time why protein mutations lead to the familial form of Parkinson’s disease.                         

Study Finds Videos Can Help Infants Learn Communication Skills

January 22, 2015 4:20 pm | by Emory University | News | Comments

Children under two years old can learn certain communication skills from a video.                              

Moving Closer to a Personalized Treatment Solution for Intellectual Disability

January 22, 2015 10:36 am | by Scripps Research Institute | News | Comments

Scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have produced an approach that protects animal models against a type of genetic disruption that causes intellectual disability, including serious memory impairments and altered anxiety levels.

Video-based Therapy May Benefit Babies at Risk of Autism

January 22, 2015 10:14 am | by University of Manchester | News | Comments

Researchers at The University of Manchester have, for the first time, shown that video-based therapy for families with babies at risk of autism improves infants’ engagement, attention and social behaviour, and might reduce the likelihood of such children developing later autism.

The Ups and Downs of the Seemingly Idle Brain

January 21, 2015 9:16 am | by Brown University | News | Comments

A new study probed deep into this somewhat mysterious cycle in mice, to learn more about how the mammalian brain accomplishes it.                      

Researchers Find Novel Signaling Pathway Involved in Appetite Control

January 20, 2015 3:33 pm | by Tim Stephens - UC Santa Cruz | News | Comments

A new study has revealed important details of a molecular signaling system in the brain that is involved in the control of body weight and metabolism.                   

New Fibers Can Deliver Many Simultaneous Stimuli

January 20, 2015 3:22 pm | by David L. Chandler - MIT | News | Comments

The human brain’s complexity makes it extremely challenging to study.                                

Researchers Discover 'Idiosyncratic' Brain Patterns in Autism

January 20, 2015 10:42 am | by Carnegie Mellon | News | Comments

Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) has been studied for many years, but there are still many more questions than answers. For example, some research into the brain functions of individuals with autism spectrum have found a lack of synchronization ('connectivity') between different parts of the brain that normally work in tandem.

Genetic Clues Found in Fragile X Syndrome

January 16, 2015 2:09 pm | by Julia Evangelou Strait, Washington University in St. Louis | News | Comments

Scientists have gained new insight into fragile X syndrome — the most common cause of inherited intellectual disability.                        

Depression, Behavioral Changes May Precede Memory Loss in Alzheimer's

January 16, 2015 10:09 am | by Washington University in St. Louis | News | Comments

Depression and behavioral changes may occur before memory declines in people who will go on to develop Alzheimer’s disease, according to new research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.                                  

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