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Effects of High-risk Parkinson’s Mutation Are Reversible

October 15, 2014 3:08 pm | News | Comments

Researchers have found vital new evidence on how to target and reverse the effects caused by one of the most common genetic causes of Parkinson’s.                             

Exercise Can Improve Memory in People Over 60

October 14, 2014 12:53 pm | News | Comments

A new study shows that physical activity can improve memory performance in older people through increasing volume and blood flow in an area of the brain called hippocampus.                       

Damage to Brain ‘Hubs’ Causes Extensive Impairment

October 14, 2014 12:41 pm | News | Comments

Injuries to six brain areas are much more devastating to patients’ abilities to think and adapt to everyday challenges than damage to other parts of the brain, scientists have learned.                    

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ALS Progression Linked to Increased Protein Instability

October 14, 2014 12:28 pm | News | Comments

A new study suggests a cause of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease. The study provides evidence that those proteins linked to more severe forms of the disease are less stable structurally and more prone to form clusters or aggregates.

Chemical from Broccoli Sprouts Promising Against Autism

October 14, 2014 11:41 am | News | Comments

Results of a small clinical trial suggest that a chemical derived from broccoli sprouts— and best known for claims that it can help prevent certain cancers— may ease classic behavioral symptoms in those with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs).   

Gene Links Rare Infections with Predisposition to Autoimmune Disease

October 13, 2014 1:47 pm | News | Comments

Scientists discovered an immune protein with paradoxical roles: It both aids and tamps down aspects of an immune system response, according to new research.                           

What Happens to Your Brain When Your Mind is at Rest?

October 13, 2014 1:34 pm | News | Comments

For many years, the focus of brain mapping was to examine changes in the brain that occur when people are attentively engaged in an activity. No one spent much time thinking about what happens to the brain when people are doing very little. But new research has done just that.

Scientists Sniff Out Unexpected Role for Stem Cells in the Brain

October 13, 2014 1:09 pm | Videos | Comments

Scientists report that newly formed brain cells in the mouse olfactory system— the area that processes smells— play a critical role in maintaining proper connections.                        

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Newly Discovered Brain Cells Explain Oxytocin's Prosocial Effect

October 10, 2014 11:43 am | News | Comments

Oxytocin, the body’s natural love potion, helps couples fall in love, makes mothers bond with their babies, and encourages teams to work together. Now, new research reveals a mechanism by which this prosocial hormone has its effect on interactions between the sexes, at least in certain situations. The key is a newly discovered class of brain cells.

Neural Stem Cell Overgrowth, Autism-like Behavior May be Linked

October 10, 2014 11:36 am | News | Comments

People with autism spectrum disorder often experience a period of accelerated brain growth after birth. No one knows why, or whether the change is linked to any specific behavioral changes. A new mouse study demonstrates how inflammation can trigger an excessive division of neural stem cells that can cause “overgrowth” in offspring’s brain.

Manipulating Memory with Light

October 10, 2014 11:30 am | News | Comments

Just look into the light: not quite, but researchers have used light to erase specific memories in mice, and proved a basic theory of how different parts of the brain work together to retrieve episodic memories.            

Similar but Different: New Discovery for Degenerative Disease

October 10, 2014 11:26 am | News | Comments

Researchers have established how two degenerative diseases that present in similar ways are in fact quite different. Progressive Supranuclear palsy (PSP) and Parkinson’s disease (PD) have overlapping symptoms but remain difficult to distinguish.

New Brain-repairing Mechanism Discovered

October 10, 2014 11:18 am | News | Comments

A previously unknown mechanism through which the brain produces new nerve cells after a stroke has been discovered. The researchers have shown that following an induced stroke in mice, support cells, so-called astrocytes, start to form nerve cells in the injured part of the brain.

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Restoring Familiar Sensations to Amputees

October 9, 2014 1:05 pm | Videos | Comments

Even before he lost his right hand to an industrial accident four years ago, Igor Spetic had family open his medicine bottles. Cotton balls give him goose bumps. Now, blindfolded during an experiment, he feels his arm hairs raise when a researcher brushes the back of his prosthetic hand with a cotton ball.

Autism as a Disorder of Prediction

October 9, 2014 12:10 pm | News | Comments

Autism is characterized by many different symptoms: difficulty interacting with others, repetitive behaviors, and hypersensitivity to sound and other stimuli. Neuroscientists have put forth a new hypothesis that accounts for these behaviors and may provide a neurological foundation for many of the disparate features of the disorder.

Toddlers Regulate Behavior to Avoid Making Adults Angry

October 8, 2014 11:56 am | Videos | Comments

When kids say “the darnedest things,” it’s often in response to something they heard or saw. Now researchers found that children as young as 15 months can detect anger when watching other people’s social interactions and then use that emotional information to guide their own behavior.

Medicine Nobel Goes to Discovery of Brain's GPS

October 6, 2014 7:36 am | by Karl Ritter and Jill Lawless - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

A U.S.-British scientist and a Norwegian husband-and-wife research team won the Nobel Prize in medicine Monday for discovering the brain's navigation system - the inner GPS that helps us find our way in the world - a revelation that could lead to advances in diagnosing Alzheimer's.

‘Mini-stroke’ May Lead to PTSD

October 3, 2014 2:46 pm | News | Comments

A “mini-stroke” may increase your risk of developing post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), according to new research. The study found that one in three transient ischemic attack (TIA) patients develop PTSD.         

Curiosity Helps Learning, Memory

October 3, 2014 2:32 pm | News | Comments

Curiosity helps us learn about a topic, and being in a curious state also helps the brain memorize unrelated information, according to new research. The study provides insight into how piquing our curiosity changes our brains.        

Applying Proteomics to Parkinson’s

October 3, 2014 12:15 pm | News | Comments

Scientists studying two genes that are mutated in an early-onset form of Parkinson’s disease have deciphered how normal versions of these genes collaborate to help rid cells of damaged mitochondria.               

Predicting Abstract Judgments from Brain Waves

October 2, 2014 2:44 pm | News | Comments

People make immediate judgments about images they are shown, which could impact on their decisions, even before their brains have had time to consciously process the information, a study of brainwaves has found.            

Schizophrenia, Bipolar Disorder Linked to Dendritic Spine Loss in Brain

October 2, 2014 2:32 pm | News | Comments

Schizophrenia and bipolar disorder both appear to be associated with dendritic spine loss in the brain, according to a new study, which suggests that the two distinct disorders may share common pathophysiological features.        

Research Explores New Possibilities for Epilepsy Treatment

October 1, 2014 3:34 pm | News | Comments

Ongoing research is investigating the connection between initial seizures and the onset of epilepsy later in life. Nearly one in 10 Americans will experience an initial seizure, but only 3 percent of those who experience a seizure will go on to develop epilepsy.

Omega-3 Fatty Acids May Prevent Some Forms of Depression

October 1, 2014 3:29 pm | News | Comments

Omega-3 fatty acids, more commonly known as fish oil, have a long list of health benefits, including lowering the risk of heart disease and reducing triglyceride levels. These nutritional compounds are also known to have anti-depressant and anti-inflammatory properties.

Memory Loss Associated with Alzheimer's Reversed for First Time

October 1, 2014 3:24 pm | News | Comments

In the first small study of a novel, personalized and comprehensive program to reverse memory loss, nine of 10 participants displayed subjective or objective improvement in their memories.                   

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