Advertisement
International News
Subscribe to International News

The Lead

U.S. to Track Everyone Coming from Ebola Nations

October 23, 2014 8:30 am | by Mike Stobbe - AP Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

All travelers who come into the U.S. from three Ebola-stricken West African nations will now be monitored for three weeks, the latest step by federal officials to keep the disease from spreading into the country.            

2nd Dallas Nurse Tests Positive for Ebola

October 15, 2014 12:58 pm | by Emily Schmall and Nomaan Merchant - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

The second health care worker diagnosed with Ebola in Texas is a 29-year-old nurse...

3 Win Chemistry Nobel for Super-zoom Microscopes

October 8, 2014 10:36 am | by Karl Ritter and Malin Rising – Associated Press – Associated Press | News | Comments

Two Americans and a German scientist won the Nobel Prize in chemistry Wednesday for finding ways...

How Well Do You Know Nobel Prizes?

October 5, 2014 4:36 am | by Karl Ritter - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

Nobel season is upon us. On Monday, the Nobel Prize judges began a series of daily...

View Sample

FREE Email Newsletter

‘Parent’ Cells Reset the Cell Division Clock

May 8, 2014 1:38 pm | News | Comments

Melbourne researchers have overturned a 40-year-old theory on when and how cells divide, showing that ‘parent’ cells program a cell division time for their offspring that is different from their own. Scientists from the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute have shown that both phases of the cell cycle contribute to the overall change in division time rather than one staying fixed in duration as previously thought.

Stress May Naturally Make Stem Cells of Mature Cells

April 30, 2014 3:21 pm | by Cynthia Fox | Blogs | Comments

Stress can naturally prompt mammals to make “extraordinary” stem cells from certain “ordinary” mature cells by dedifferentiation. Three strong papers finding this came out within weeks of the controversial Nature “acid bath” work, which was about dedifferentiating mature cells into stem cells via the stress of acid. Confidence in the “acid” work hit a new low. But the other three studies drew some raves.

Breaking News: Growing Concerns Over STAP Cell Sources

March 27, 2014 10:25 am | by Cynthia Fox | Blogs | Comments

Cloning pioneer Teru Wakayama found two STAP stem cell batches made for recent Nature STAP papers were apparently not derived from a 129 mouse strain, as he was told, but F1 and B6 strains. While the erroneous data, which appeared in one of the papers, does not affect the works' main thrust, it is spurring calls for reviews of other STAP stem cell sources.

Advertisement

Nature Rejects Challenge to "Acid Stem Cells"; Scientists Try New Tips

March 24, 2014 9:51 am | by Cynthia Fox | Blogs | Comments

Nature has rejected the paper of a top Hong Kong researcher whose lab several times failed to replicate results of the now-famous “acid bath” stem cell papers. That researcher is now trying to reproduce the work as it appears in yet another new updated protocol, posted Thursday by Harvard researchers. Meanwhile, in interviews, Harvard's Vacanti clarifies some mysteries.

Emergency Alert in the Cell

February 28, 2014 12:10 pm | News | Comments

When a cell is exposed to dangerous environmental conditions such as high temperatures or toxic substances, the cellular stress response, also called heat shock response, is initiated. Scientists could uncover an entire network of cellular helpers and thus identify new regulatory mechanisms of this stress response.

New Stem Cell Sagas

February 25, 2014 11:20 am | by Cynthia Fox | Blogs | Comments

A recipe detailing how to make extraordinary stem cells from ordinary cells—just by "stressing" them with acid—will "soon" be posted for all to try, says Riken. This could settle much controversy surrounding the cells...or spur more. Meanwhile, there have been "anecdotes" of success.

Grape Seed Promise in Fight Against Bowel Cancer

February 14, 2014 1:09 pm | News | Comments

University of Adelaide research has shown for the first time that grape seed can aid the effectiveness of chemotherapy in killing colon cancer cells as well as reducing the chemotherapy's side effects. The researchers say that combining grape seed extracts with chemotherapy has potential as a new approach for bowel cancer treatment - to both reduce intestinal damage commonly caused by cancer chemotherapy and to enhance its effect.

Red Alert: Body Kills ‘Spontaneous’ Blood Cancers on a Daily Basis

February 3, 2014 11:54 am | News | Comments

Immune cells undergo ‘spontaneous’ changes on a daily basis that could lead to cancers if not for the diligent surveillance of our immune system, scientists have found. The research team from the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute found that the immune system was responsible for eliminating potentially cancerous immune B cells in their early stages, before they developed into B-cell lymphomas (also known as non-Hodgkin’s lymphomas).

Advertisement

Making Your Brain Social

February 3, 2014 11:48 am | News | Comments

In many people with autism and other neurodevelopmental disorders, different parts of the brain don’t talk to each other very well. Scientists have now identified, for the first time, a way in which this decreased functional connectivity can come about.

Brain on Autopilot

January 16, 2014 11:36 am | News | Comments

The structure of the human brain is complex, reminiscent of a circuit diagram with countless connections. But what role does this architecture play in the functioning of the brain? To answer this question, researchers have for the first time analyzed 1.6 billion connections within the brain simultaneously.

Fish Derived Serum Omega-3 Fatty Acids Help Reduce the Risk of Type 2 Diabetes

January 14, 2014 11:12 am | News | Comments

High concentrations of serum long-chain omega-3 fatty acids may help reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes, according to a University of Eastern Finland study. The sources of these fatty acids are fish and fish oils. The Kuopio Ischaemic Heart Disease Risk Factor Study (KIHD) determined the serum omega-3 fatty acid concentrations of 2,212 men between 42 and 60 years of age at the onset of the study, in 1984–1989.

Swedish Doctors Transplant Wombs into 9 Women

January 13, 2014 2:15 am | by MALIN RISING - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

Nine women in Sweden have successfully received transplanted wombs donated from relatives and will soon try to become pregnant, the doctor in charge of the pioneering project has revealed. The women were born without a uterus or had it removed because of cervical cancer. Most are in their 30s and are part of the first major experiment to test whether it's possible to transplant wombs into women so they can give birth to their own children.

Frederick Sanger, Genomics Pioneer, Dies at 95

November 20, 2013 12:03 pm | by CASSANDRA VINOGRAD - Associated Press | News | Comments

British biochemist Frederick Sanger, who twice won the Nobel Prize in chemistry and was a pioneer of genome sequencing, has died at the age of 95. His death was confirmed Wednesday by the MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology - which Sanger helped found.

Advertisement

Roche to Invest 800 Million Swiss Francs in Global Biologic Medicine Manufacturing Network

October 14, 2013 1:00 am | by Roche | News | Comments

Roche announced plans to invest 800 million Swiss francs within its global manufacturing network to increase production capabilities for its biologic medicines over the next five years. The investment will be spread across sites in Penzberg (Germany), Basel (Switzerland), as well as Vacaville and Oceanside (USA). Approximately 500 new jobs are expected to be created in conjunction with the facility expansions.

Computer Models Win Chemistry Nobel

October 9, 2013 11:07 am | by Karl Ritter and Malin Rising, Associated Press | News | Comments

Three U.S.-based scientists won this year's Nobel Prize in chemistry on Wednesday for developing powerful computer models that researchers use to understand complex chemical interactions and create new drugs.           

One in Four has Alarmingly Few Intestinal Bacteria

August 29, 2013 10:43 am | News | Comments

International research with participation of Danish investigators from University of Copenhagen shows that one in four Danes has serious problems with the trillion of bacteria living in their intestines. The problems appear to be associated with increased risk of obesity and diabetes.

Historic Japan Stem Cell Trial Approved

August 14, 2013 12:00 pm | by Cynthia Fox | Articles | Comments

The first clinical trial of revolutionary stem cells that won a Nobel Prize for their developer has been greenlit. The cells, called induced pluripotent stem (iPS) Cells, will be morphed into retinal cells, then given to six patients with a major cause of blindness: age-related macular degeneration (AMD).

WHO: Slight Cancer Risk After Japan Nuke Accident

February 28, 2013 3:20 pm | by MARIA CHENG - AP Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

Two years after Japan’s nuclear plant disaster, an international team of experts said that residents of areas hit by the highest doses of radiation face an increased cancer risk so small it probably won’t be detectable. In fact, experts calculated that increase at about 1 extra percentage point added to a Japanese infant’s lifetime cancer risk.

Implants Make Light Work of Fixing Broken Bones

February 8, 2013 10:14 am | News | Comments

Artificial bone, created using stem cells and a new lightweight plastic, could soon be used to heal shattered limbs. The use of bone stem cells combined with a degradable rigid material that inserts into broken bones and encourages real bone to re-grow has been developed at the Universities of Edinburgh and Southampton.

Can You Predict How a Disease Will Spread in a Population?

February 5, 2013 10:37 am | News | Comments

How, when and where a pathogen is transmitted between two individuals in a population is crucial in understanding and predicting how a disease will spread. New research has laid the foundation for a new generation of zoonotic disease spreading models, which could allow for more targeted prevention strategies.

Immune System Molecule with Hidden Talents

January 22, 2013 11:56 am | News | Comments

Dendritic cells perform a vital role for the immune system: They engulf pathogens, break them down into their component parts, and then display the pieces on their surface. In order to do their job, they are dependent upon the support from a class of immune system molecules, which have never before been associated with dendritic cells: antibodies.

Wind in the Willows Boosts Biofuel Production

January 21, 2013 12:58 pm | News | Comments

Willow trees cultivated for green energy can yield up to five times more biofuel if they grow diagonally, compared with those that are allowed to grow naturally up towards the sky. Researchers have identified a genetic trait that causes this effect and is activated in some trees when they sense they are at an angle, such as where they are blown sideways in windy conditions.

Four-stranded ‘Quadruple Helix’ DNA Structure Proven to Exist in Human Cells

January 21, 2013 12:55 pm | News | Comments

In 1953, Cambridge researchers Watson and Crick published a paper describing the interweaving ‘double helix’ DNA structure – the chemical code for all life. Now, in the year of that scientific landmark’s 60th Anniversary, Cambridge researchers have published a paper proving that four-stranded ‘quadruple helix’ DNA structures – known as G-quadruplexes – also exist within the human genome.

China to Boost Biotech Industry

January 9, 2013 1:16 pm | News | Comments

The Chinese government will give a boost to the biotechnology industry in order to tackle problems related to population growth, food safety, energy conservation and environmental protection, the State Council said. The government aims to double the share of GDP that the sector's value-added output accounts for by 2015 from the 2010 level.

BD and PEPFAR Collaborate

August 4, 2010 10:54 am | by Edited for tone and content by Lily Barback | Articles | Comments

BD (Becton, Dickinson and Company) and the U.S. President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) through the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) set in motion a joint, multi-year initiative to improve blood collection practices in African clinics and hospitals.

X
You may login with either your assigned username or your e-mail address.
The password field is case sensitive.
Loading