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Upside Down and Inside Out

April 27, 2015 10:18 am | by University of Cambridge | News | Comments

Researchers have captured the first 3D video of a living algal embryo turning itself inside out, from a sphere to a mushroom shape and back again. The results could help unravel the mechanical processes at work during a similar process in animals, which has been called the “most important time in your life.”

Game Shows Mosquito's-eye View of Malaria

April 24, 2015 10:05 am | by University of Oxford | News | Comments

A new game about the life cycle of malaria that can be played on Android smartphones. Officially...

Link Discovery Points to Potential New Alzheimer's Treatment

April 24, 2015 9:50 am | by University of Cambridge | News | Comments

Researchers have identified how proteins that play a key role in Alzheimer’s disease are linked...

Technology Can Transfer Human Emotions to Your Palm Through Air, Say Scientists

April 23, 2015 9:22 am | by University of Sussex | News | Comments

Human emotion can be transferred by technology that stimulates different parts of the hand...

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Listen to Your Heart: Why Your Brain May Give Away How Well You Know Yourself

April 22, 2015 11:11 am | by University of Cambridge | News | Comments

“Listen to your heart,” sang Swedish pop group Roxette in the late Eighties. But not everyone is able to tune into their heartbeat, according to an international team of researchers – and half of us under- or over-estimate our ability.

Oldest Ever DNA Sample from Calcified Neanderthal Man

April 17, 2015 1:52 pm | by Sean Alloca, Editor, Forensic Magazine | Articles | Comments

Bones found in an Italian cave over two decades ago might have provided the oldest Neanderthal DNA ever tested.

Mountain Gorilla Genome Study Provides Optimism About Population Numbers

April 14, 2015 10:41 am | by University of Cambridge | News | Comments

An international research project to sequence whole genomes from mountain gorillas has given scientists and conservationists new insight into the impact of population decline on these critically endangered apes. While mountain gorillas are extensively inbred and at risk of extinction, research published today in Science finds more to be optimistic about in their genomes than expected.

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Cancer Surge in China Prompts Rise of Special Patient Hotels

April 13, 2015 9:04 am | by Jack Chang, Associated Press | News | Comments

Li Xiaohe has set herself up for the long haul in a cramped but sunny room in western Beijing, about a block from China's most renowned cancer hospital. Her laundry dries on hangers and her husband cooks in a communal kitchen as she embarks on an 84-day program of chemotherapy, following the removal of part of her right breast.

Genetic Screening Could Improve Breast Cancer Prevention

April 10, 2015 9:26 am | by The Institute of Cancer Research | News | Comments

A test for a wide range of genetic risk factors could improve doctors’ ability to work out which women are at increased risk of developing breast cancer, a major study of more than 65,000 women has shown.

Distance Running May Be an Evolutionary ‘Signal’ for Desirable Male Genes

April 9, 2015 10:58 am | by University of Cambridge | News | Comments

New research shows that males with higher ‘reproductive potential’ are better distance runners. This may have been used by females as a reliable signal of high male genetic quality during our hunter-gatherer past, as good runners are more likely to have other traits of good hunters and providers, such as intelligence and generosity.

Playing Music By Professional Musicians Activates Genes For Learning and Memory

March 27, 2015 3:36 pm | by University of Helsinki | News | Comments

Playing music by professional musicians activates genes responsible for brain function and singing of songbirds.

Study: Ebola Takes Worst Toll On Babies, Other Young Kids

March 26, 2015 10:47 am | by Marilynn Marchione, AP Chief Medical Writer | News | Comments

Ebola has taken its greatest toll on babies. About 90 percent of children under age 1 who caught the virus in West Africa died from it, the first large study of the epidemic's impact on children suggests.

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Official: Ebola Survivor May Have Infected New Liberia Case

March 25, 2015 10:58 am | by Associated Press | News | Comments

A woman who tested positive for Ebola in Liberia last week is dating a survivor of the disease, a health official said Tuesday, offering a possible explanation for how she became the country's first confirmed case in weeks.

Tuberculosis Research Takes Off

March 25, 2015 10:53 am | by Max Planck Institute | News | Comments

Scientists call for a global strategy for the development of new tuberculosis vaccines.

Oldest Homo Fossil Implies Humans Created by Climate Change

March 25, 2015 9:39 am | by Cynthia Fox, Science Writer | Articles | Comments

On an East African hill somewhere in “Afar,” a stone’s throw from “Awash,” two sections of a large detached jawbone grinned brokenly at Ethiopian Arizona State University (ASU) graduate student Chalachew Seyoum. The pieces were just lying there, so the student picked them up and brought them together. They fit “perfectly,” he said.

Liberians Overcome Fear to Volunteer For Ebola Vaccine Trial

March 23, 2015 9:47 am | by Jonathan Paye-Layleh, Associated Press | News | Comments

Liberians are overcoming their fears of Ebola to volunteer for a vaccine trial.

US Anti-drugs Work in Colombia Uses Cancer-linked Herbicide

March 23, 2015 9:40 am | by Joshua Goodman, Associated Press | News | Comments

New labeling on the world's most popular weed killer as a likely cause of cancer is raising more questions for an aerial spraying program in Colombia that underpins U.S.-financed efforts to wipe out cocaine crops.

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British DNA Gives Window into Ancient Past

March 19, 2015 3:38 pm | by Malcolm Ritter, AP Science Writer | News | Comments

Genetic samples collected from across the United Kingdom are shedding light on the ancient past, including Viking invasions and a mystery about the arrival of the Anglo-Saxons.

Scientists Grow 'Mini-Lungs' to Aid the Study of Cystic Fibrosis

March 19, 2015 10:40 am | by University of Cambridge | News | Comments

Scientists at the University of Cambridge have successfully created ‘mini-lungs’ using stem cells derived from skin cells of patients with cystic fibrosis, and have shown that these can be used to test potential new drugs for this debilitating lung disease.

Study Links Stress to Chromosomal Damage

March 19, 2015 10:27 am | by Colorado State University | News | Comments

A new wildlife preserve in India recently became a laboratory for Colorado State University researchers who studied not endangered animals but villagers displaced by the preserve. They found that such stress takes a measurable toll on people’s health.

Sierra Leone Plans Another Shutdown to Stop Ebola's Spread

March 19, 2015 9:40 am | by Clarence Roy-Macaulay, Associated Press | News | Comments

Sierra Leone is planning another three-day, countrywide shutdown later this month to ferret out Ebola cases, remind people how to protect themselves from the disease and control its transmission.

Obese Women 40 percent More Likely to Get Cancer

March 18, 2015 12:00 pm | by Cancer Research UK | News | Comments

Obese women have around a 40 percent greater risk of developing a weight-related cancer in their lifetime than women of a healthy weight, according to new figures* released by Cancer Research UK Tuesday.

Telemedicine Project Launched in Botswana

March 16, 2015 9:54 am | by University of Pennsylvania | News | Comments

The Botswana-UPenn Partnership (BUP) is collaborating with Microsoft, the Botswana Innovation Hub, and other global partners to launch the first telemedicine service in Africa using TV white spaces to bring internet connectivity to hospitals and clinics across rural areas of Botswana.

Swine Flu Outbreak in India Raises Concern

March 12, 2015 10:20 am | by Anne Trafton, MIT | News | Comments

MIT study finds evidence that a new strain of H1N1 may carry dangerous mutations.

Unicef Warns Lack of Toilets in Pakistan Tied to Stunting

March 9, 2015 10:43 am | by Associated Press | News | Comments

 More than 40 million people in Pakistan do not have access to a toilet, forcing them to defecate in the open, which in turn is a major contributor to stunting in the country, a top UNICEF official said.         

Liberia Removes Ebola Crematorium as Outbreak is Contained

March 9, 2015 10:07 am | by Jonathan Paye-Layleh, Associated Press | News | Comments

Marking the progress in controlling its Ebola outbreak, the Liberian government dismantled a crematorium and removed drums containing the ashes of more than 3,000 Ebola victims cremated during the height of the epidemic, whose last patient was discharged last week.

Researchers Report New Gene Associated With Thyroid Levels

March 9, 2015 10:01 am | by University of Bristol | News | Comments

Thyroid hormones have important and diverse roles in human health and regulate metabolic rate. Thyroid disease is common (affecting 5-10 per cent of the population) and synthetic thyroid hormones are one of the commonest drug therapies prescribed worldwide.

UN Warns Against Complacency as Ebola Fight Enters New Phase

March 3, 2015 10:23 am | by Lorne Cook, Associated Press | News | Comments

The United Nations is urging donors, organizations and countries fighting Ebola in West Africa not to give in to complacency as the death toll from the virus climbs toward 10,000.             

Sierra Leone's Vice President in Quarantine for Ebola

March 2, 2015 9:34 am | by Clarence Roy-Macaulay, Associated Press | News | Comments

Sierra Leone's vice president has put himself in quarantine following the death from Ebola of one of his security guards.                       

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