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Officials: Little Risk of Ebola Outbreak in U.S.

July 29, 2014 8:21 am | by Mike Stobbe - AP Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

U.S. health officials are monitoring the Ebola outbreak in Africa but say the risk of the deadly germ spreading to the United States is remote. The Centers for Disease Control on Monday sent a health alert to U.S. doctors about the outbreak.   

Nigeria Death Shows Ebola Can Spread by Air Travel

July 28, 2014 8:21 am | by Heather Murdock - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

Nigerian health authorities raced to stop the spread of Ebola on Saturday after a man sick with...

Is Europe Putting Cancer Research at Risk?

July 25, 2014 1:53 pm | News | Comments

The European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO) has expressed concern that the proposed EU...

China Lifts Quarantine in Plague City

July 24, 2014 1:20 am | News | Comments

A nine-day quarantine imposed on parts of a northern Chinese city where a man there died of...

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Parts of Chinese City Sealed for Bubonic Plague

July 22, 2014 11:20 pm | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

Parts of a northern Chinese city have been quarantined after state media said a man there died of bubonic plague. The Chinese news agency Xinhua said Tuesday that 151 people were under observation in the city of Yumen in Gansu province after authorities determined they had come in contact with a man who had died of the plague July 16.

A-maize-ing Double Life of a Genome

July 15, 2014 12:06 pm | News | Comments

Early maize farmers selected for genes that improved the harvesting of sunlight, a new detailed study of how plants use 'doubles' of their genomes reveals. The findings could help current efforts to improve existing crop varieties. Oxford University researchers captured a 'genetic snapshot' of maize as it existed 10 million years ago when the plant made a double of its genome—a 'whole genome duplication' event.

As STAP Papers are Retracted, A Riken Researcher Mulls Stalling World-First Trial

July 2, 2014 2:55 pm | by Cynthia Fox | Articles | Comments

Just as Nature was setting about retracting two famous Riken CDB papers claiming to make “STAP” stem cells from ordinary cells, another Riken researcher said she might suspend a world-first clinical trial of a competing—legitimate—stem cell technique. But within hours, she modified her views, according to Riken.

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Cancer Risk: Aspirin and Smoking Affect Aging of Genes

July 1, 2014 11:23 am | News | Comments

The risk of developing cancer increases with age. Factors like smoking and regular aspirin use also affect the risk of cancer—although in the opposite sense. Researchers from the University of Basel were now able to show that aspirin use and smoking both influence aging processes of the female genome that are connected to colorectal cancer.

Scientists Break the Genetic Code for Diabetes in Greenland

June 19, 2014 3:35 pm | Videos | Comments

A piece of detective work has mapped a special gene variant among Greenlanders that plays a particularly important role in the development of type 2 diabetes. The results can be used to improve prevention and treatment options for those genetically at-risk.

One Japan Stem Cell Institute Soars, One Struggles

June 18, 2014 12:59 pm | by Cynthia Fox | Articles | Comments

As Nobel Prize-winning scientist Shinya Yamanaka regaled a New York crowd with advances that may send his Japanese institute to the top of the global stem cell field, investigators in Tokyo said the stem cell division at his sister institute is so wracked with problems it should dismantle—or dramatically revamp.

Study Documents MERS Spread from Camel to Person

June 4, 2014 5:17 pm | by Mike Stobbe - AP Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

A new report offers the strongest evidence yet that a mysterious Middle East virus spreads from camels to people. Researchers studied the illness of a 44-year-old camel owner in Saudi Arabia, who died in November of Middle East respiratory syndrome, or MERS.

One Chip, One Dream: The Pursuit of a DNA-powered Lab-on-a-chip

June 4, 2014 1:38 pm | by Christina Jakubowski, News Editor | Articles | Comments

Christofer Toumazou believes he can change the world with his “one chip, one bug – one chip, one drug,” slogan. Nominated for the European Patent Office’s 2014 European Inventor award, he holds a patent for the technology behind a microchip that can analyze DNA within 30 minutes and without a laboratory.

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MERS Virus Spread Person-to-person, CDC Says

May 19, 2014 1:34 pm | by Mike Stobbe, Associated Press | News | Comments

Health officials reported Saturday what appears to be the first time that a mysterious Middle East virus has spread from one person to another in the United States.                         

MERS Isn't a Global Emergency, WHO Says

May 14, 2014 12:31 pm | by Maria Cheng, AP Medical Writer | News | Comments

The spread of a puzzling respiratory virus in the Middle East and beyond is not a global health emergency despite a recent spike in cases, the World Health Organization said Wednesday. Read more...               

Officials Confirm Reports of Second US MERS Case

May 12, 2014 1:53 pm | News | Comments

Health officials have confirmed a second U.S. case of a mysterious virus that has sickened hundreds in the Middle East. A news conference to discuss the case has been scheduled for Monday afternoon by the Florida Department of Health and the CDC.

MERS Experts Working on Way to Block Virus

May 6, 2014 12:45 pm | News | Comments

A team of researchers is creating molecules designed to shut down the Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus, or MERS-CoV, that recently arrived in the United States.                       

CDC Confirms First US Case of MERS Infection

May 5, 2014 8:21 am | by Mike Stobbe - AP Medical Writer | News | Comments

Health officials confirmed the first case of an American infected with a mysterious virus that has sickened hundreds in the Middle East. Federal and state health officials announced on Monday that they are scheduled to discuss their response to the illness.

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Live Virus Implicates Camels in MERS Outbreak

April 29, 2014 12:48 pm | News | Comments

There is new, more definitive evidence implicating camels in the ongoing outbreak of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome, or MERS. Scientists extracted a complete, live, infectious sample of MERS coronavirus (MERS-CoV) from two camels in Saudi Arabia.

Ebola Virus in Africa Outbreak is New Strain

April 16, 2014 5:21 pm | by Marilynn Marchione - AP Chief Medical Writer | News | Comments

The Ebola virus that has killed scores of people in Guinea this year is a new strain - evidence that the disease did not spread there from outbreaks in some other African nations, scientists report.               

Diabetes Cases Nearly Doubled Over Past Two Decades

April 16, 2014 1:52 pm | News | Comments

Cases of diabetes and pre-diabetes in the United States have nearly doubled since 1988, suggests new research, with obesity apparently to blame for the surge.                           

Breaking News: Growing Concerns Over STAP Cell Sources

March 27, 2014 10:25 am | by Cynthia Fox | Blogs | Comments

Cloning pioneer Teru Wakayama found two STAP stem cell batches made for recent Nature STAP papers were apparently not derived from a 129 mouse strain, as he was told, but F1 and B6 strains. While the erroneous data, which appeared in one of the papers, does not affect the works' main thrust, it is spurring calls for reviews of other STAP stem cell sources.

Making Your Brain Social

February 3, 2014 11:48 am | News | Comments

In many people with autism and other neurodevelopmental disorders, different parts of the brain don’t talk to each other very well. Scientists have now identified, for the first time, a way in which this decreased functional connectivity can come about.

Parkinson Gene: Nerve Growth Factor Halts Mitochondrial Degeneration

January 31, 2014 1:20 pm | News | Comments

Neurodegenerative diseases like Parkinson’s disease involve the death of thousands of neurons in the brain. Nerve growth factors produced by the body, such as GDNF, promote the survival of the neurons; however, clinical tests with GDNF have not yielded in any clear improvements.

Genetic Marker Predicts Susceptibility to H7N9 Bird Flu

December 26, 2013 12:07 pm | News | Comments

Published in the Journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, senior author, Associate Professor Katherine Kedzierska from the Department of Microbiology and Immunology said that being able to predict which patients will be more susceptible to the emerging influenza strain, will allow clinicians to better manage an early intervention strategy.

Systematic, Genomic Study of Cervical Cancer Completed

December 26, 2013 11:19 am | News | Comments

Researchers from the Boston area, Mexico and Norway have completed a comprehensive genomic analysis of cervical cancer in two patient populations. The study identified recurrent genetic mutations not previously found in cervical cancer, including at least one for which targeted treatments have been approved for other forms of cancer.

New Drug Candidates for Chagas Disease Show Promise

December 26, 2013 10:45 am | News | Comments

A team of researchers from Canada has developed a class of compounds which may help eradicate a neglected tropical disease that is currently hard to kill in its chronic form. The research was published ahead of print in Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy.

Bird Flu Strain Kills Human for the First Time

December 18, 2013 1:01 am | by GILLIAN WONG - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

Chinese authorities said Wednesday that a 73-year-old Chinese woman died after being infected with a bird flu strain that had sickened a human for the first time, a development that the World Health Organization called "worrisome."     

Cure or Drug for Dementia Possible by 2025

December 12, 2013 8:30 am | by MARIA CHENG - AP Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

British Prime Minister David Cameron says he hopes to kick-start an international effort to find a cure or effective treatment for dementia by 2025.                              

Fight Against Malaria Slowing, WHO Report Says

December 11, 2013 11:01 am | by MARIA CHENG - AP Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

Global efforts to curb malaria are stalling after a drop in funds to buy bed nets, according to the latest report Wednesday from the World Health Organization. In 2010, 145 million bed nets were distributed; that fell to 92 million in 2011 and 70 million last year.

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