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Study: Ebola Takes Worst Toll On Babies, Other Young Kids

March 26, 2015 10:47 am | by Marilynn Marchione, AP Chief Medical Writer | News | Comments

Ebola has taken its greatest toll on babies. About 90 percent of children under age 1 who caught the virus in West Africa died from it, the first large study of the epidemic's impact on children suggests.

Official: Ebola Survivor May Have Infected New Liberia Case

March 25, 2015 10:58 am | by Associated Press | News | Comments

A woman who tested positive for Ebola in Liberia last week is dating a survivor of the disease,...

Tuberculosis Research Takes Off

March 25, 2015 10:53 am | by Max Planck Institute | News | Comments

Scientists call for a global strategy for the development of new tuberculosis vaccines.

Oldest Homo Fossil Implies Humans Created by Climate Change

March 25, 2015 9:39 am | by Cynthia Fox, Science Writer | Articles | Comments

On an East African hill somewhere in “Afar,” a stone’s throw from “Awash,” two sections of a...

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Liberians Overcome Fear to Volunteer For Ebola Vaccine Trial

March 23, 2015 9:47 am | by Jonathan Paye-Layleh, Associated Press | News | Comments

Liberians are overcoming their fears of Ebola to volunteer for a vaccine trial.

US Anti-drugs Work in Colombia Uses Cancer-linked Herbicide

March 23, 2015 9:40 am | by Joshua Goodman, Associated Press | News | Comments

New labeling on the world's most popular weed killer as a likely cause of cancer is raising more questions for an aerial spraying program in Colombia that underpins U.S.-financed efforts to wipe out cocaine crops.

British DNA Gives Window into Ancient Past

March 19, 2015 3:38 pm | by Malcolm Ritter, AP Science Writer | News | Comments

Genetic samples collected from across the United Kingdom are shedding light on the ancient past, including Viking invasions and a mystery about the arrival of the Anglo-Saxons.

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Scientists Grow 'Mini-Lungs' to Aid the Study of Cystic Fibrosis

March 19, 2015 10:40 am | by University of Cambridge | News | Comments

Scientists at the University of Cambridge have successfully created ‘mini-lungs’ using stem cells derived from skin cells of patients with cystic fibrosis, and have shown that these can be used to test potential new drugs for this debilitating lung disease.

Study Links Stress to Chromosomal Damage

March 19, 2015 10:27 am | by Colorado State University | News | Comments

A new wildlife preserve in India recently became a laboratory for Colorado State University researchers who studied not endangered animals but villagers displaced by the preserve. They found that such stress takes a measurable toll on people’s health.

Sierra Leone Plans Another Shutdown to Stop Ebola's Spread

March 19, 2015 9:40 am | by Clarence Roy-Macaulay, Associated Press | News | Comments

Sierra Leone is planning another three-day, countrywide shutdown later this month to ferret out Ebola cases, remind people how to protect themselves from the disease and control its transmission.

Obese Women 40 percent More Likely to Get Cancer

March 18, 2015 12:00 pm | by Cancer Research UK | News | Comments

Obese women have around a 40 percent greater risk of developing a weight-related cancer in their lifetime than women of a healthy weight, according to new figures* released by Cancer Research UK Tuesday.

Telemedicine Project Launched in Botswana

March 16, 2015 9:54 am | by University of Pennsylvania | News | Comments

The Botswana-UPenn Partnership (BUP) is collaborating with Microsoft, the Botswana Innovation Hub, and other global partners to launch the first telemedicine service in Africa using TV white spaces to bring internet connectivity to hospitals and clinics across rural areas of Botswana.

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Swine Flu Outbreak in India Raises Concern

March 12, 2015 10:20 am | by Anne Trafton, MIT | News | Comments

MIT study finds evidence that a new strain of H1N1 may carry dangerous mutations.

Unicef Warns Lack of Toilets in Pakistan Tied to Stunting

March 9, 2015 10:43 am | by Associated Press | News | Comments

 More than 40 million people in Pakistan do not have access to a toilet, forcing them to defecate in the open, which in turn is a major contributor to stunting in the country, a top UNICEF official said.         

Liberia Removes Ebola Crematorium as Outbreak is Contained

March 9, 2015 10:07 am | by Jonathan Paye-Layleh, Associated Press | News | Comments

Marking the progress in controlling its Ebola outbreak, the Liberian government dismantled a crematorium and removed drums containing the ashes of more than 3,000 Ebola victims cremated during the height of the epidemic, whose last patient was discharged last week.

Researchers Report New Gene Associated With Thyroid Levels

March 9, 2015 10:01 am | by University of Bristol | News | Comments

Thyroid hormones have important and diverse roles in human health and regulate metabolic rate. Thyroid disease is common (affecting 5-10 per cent of the population) and synthetic thyroid hormones are one of the commonest drug therapies prescribed worldwide.

UN Warns Against Complacency as Ebola Fight Enters New Phase

March 3, 2015 10:23 am | by Lorne Cook, Associated Press | News | Comments

The United Nations is urging donors, organizations and countries fighting Ebola in West Africa not to give in to complacency as the death toll from the virus climbs toward 10,000.             

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Sierra Leone's Vice President in Quarantine for Ebola

March 2, 2015 9:34 am | by Clarence Roy-Macaulay, Associated Press | News | Comments

Sierra Leone's vice president has put himself in quarantine following the death from Ebola of one of his security guards.                       

Million Man Study Examines Long-term Effects of Blocking Inflammation

February 27, 2015 10:07 am | by University of Cambridge | News | Comments

Inflammation - the body's response to damaging stimuli - may have a protective effect against cardiovascular disease, according to a study published in the journal Lancet Diabetes and Endocrinology.          

Ebola Doctor: Media, Politicians Fueled the Public's Fear

February 26, 2015 9:35 am | by Tom Mcelroy, Associated Press | News | Comments

A doctor who contracted the deadly Ebola virus and rode the subway system and dined out before he developed symptoms said the media and politicians could have done a better job by educating people on the science of it instead of focusing on their fears.  

UK First Country to Allow Creation of Embryos from Three People

February 25, 2015 10:21 am | by Maria Cheng, AP Medical Writer | News | Comments

The bill granting the controversial techniques was passed Tuesday by the House of Lords, after being approved earlier this month by the House of Commons.                  

Scientists Report Bionic Hand Resconstruction in Three Austrian Men

February 25, 2015 9:20 am | by Maria Cheng, AP Medical Writer | News | Comments

Three Austrians have replaced injured hands with bionic ones that they can control using nerves and muscles transplanted into their arms from their legs.                              

Cancer Risk Linked to DNA 'Wormholes'

February 19, 2015 11:59 am | by Institute of Cancer Research | News | Comments

Single-letter genetic variations within parts of the genome once dismissed as ‘junk DNA’ can increase cancer risk through 'wormhole-like' effects on far-off genes, new research shows.             

Disruption in Brain Signals Shed New Light on Melancholic Depression

February 19, 2015 11:54 am | by University of New South Wales | News | Comments

Researchers have identified a distinctive brain signature in people with melancholic depression, supporting calls for its classification as a unique mood disorder type.               

Iron May be a Factor in Dementia

February 17, 2015 4:09 pm | by Leigh Dayton, UTS | News | Comments

There is no way to spot Alzheimer's early, no effective treatment and no known cure.                             

Protein Clue to Sudden Cardiac Death

February 17, 2015 3:56 pm | by Oxford University | News | Comments

A protein has been shown to have a surprising role in regulating the 'glue' that holds heart cells together, a finding that may explain how a gene defect could cause sudden cardiac death.            

Health Groups Say AIDS No. 1 Killer of Adolescents in Africa

February 17, 2015 3:47 pm | by Tom Odula, Associated Press | News | Comments

Global health organizations said Tuesday that AIDS is now the leading cause of death for adolescents in Africa, and the second leading cause of death among adolescents globally.              

Australian Project to Combat Myanmar Snake Deaths

February 17, 2015 9:54 am | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

Australia is funding a three-year, 2.3 million Australian dollar ($1.8 million) project that will aid snakebite victims in Myanmar by upgrading care facilities and the quality and availability of antivenom.         

Ebola Victims Infectious for a Week After Death, Nonhuman Primate Study Finds

February 13, 2015 4:32 pm | by Elizabeth Doughman, Editor-in-Chief, ALN Magazine | News | Comments

The Ebola virus remains viable for at least seven days after death in non-human primates. A new study, published in Emerging Infectious Diseases, suggests that Ebola transmission from deceased individuals may be possible for an extended period of time after death, underscoring the importance of using safe practices for handling corpses.  

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