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Ebola Virus in Africa Outbreak is New Strain

April 16, 2014 5:21 pm | by Marilynn Marchione - AP Chief Medical Writer | News | Comments

The Ebola virus that has killed scores of people in Guinea this year is a new strain - evidence that the disease did not spread there from outbreaks in some other African nations, scientists report.               

Diabetes Cases Nearly Doubled Over Past Two Decades

April 16, 2014 1:52 pm | News | Comments

Cases of diabetes and pre-diabetes in the United States have nearly doubled since 1988, suggests...

Breaking News: Growing Concerns Over STAP Cell Sources

March 27, 2014 10:25 am | by Cynthia Fox | Blogs | Comments

Cloning pioneer Teru Wakayama found two STAP stem cell batches made for recent...

Making Your Brain Social

February 3, 2014 11:48 am | News | Comments

In many people with autism and other neurodevelopmental disorders, different parts of the brain...

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Parkinson Gene: Nerve Growth Factor Halts Mitochondrial Degeneration

January 31, 2014 1:20 pm | News | Comments

Neurodegenerative diseases like Parkinson’s disease involve the death of thousands of neurons in the brain. Nerve growth factors produced by the body, such as GDNF, promote the survival of the neurons; however, clinical tests with GDNF have not yielded in any clear improvements.

Genetic Marker Predicts Susceptibility to H7N9 Bird Flu

December 26, 2013 12:07 pm | News | Comments

Published in the Journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, senior author, Associate Professor Katherine Kedzierska from the Department of Microbiology and Immunology said that being able to predict which patients will be more susceptible to the emerging influenza strain, will allow clinicians to better manage an early intervention strategy.

Systematic, Genomic Study of Cervical Cancer Completed

December 26, 2013 11:19 am | News | Comments

Researchers from the Boston area, Mexico and Norway have completed a comprehensive genomic analysis of cervical cancer in two patient populations. The study identified recurrent genetic mutations not previously found in cervical cancer, including at least one for which targeted treatments have been approved for other forms of cancer.

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New Drug Candidates for Chagas Disease Show Promise

December 26, 2013 10:45 am | News | Comments

A team of researchers from Canada has developed a class of compounds which may help eradicate a neglected tropical disease that is currently hard to kill in its chronic form. The research was published ahead of print in Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy.

Bird Flu Strain Kills Human for the First Time

December 18, 2013 1:01 am | by GILLIAN WONG - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

Chinese authorities said Wednesday that a 73-year-old Chinese woman died after being infected with a bird flu strain that had sickened a human for the first time, a development that the World Health Organization called "worrisome."     

Cure or Drug for Dementia Possible by 2025

December 12, 2013 8:30 am | by MARIA CHENG - AP Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

British Prime Minister David Cameron says he hopes to kick-start an international effort to find a cure or effective treatment for dementia by 2025.                              

Fight Against Malaria Slowing, WHO Report Says

December 11, 2013 11:01 am | by MARIA CHENG - AP Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

Global efforts to curb malaria are stalling after a drop in funds to buy bed nets, according to the latest report Wednesday from the World Health Organization. In 2010, 145 million bed nets were distributed; that fell to 92 million in 2011 and 70 million last year.

Princeton to Give Students Unapproved Meningitis Vaccine

November 18, 2013 4:55 pm | by GEOFF MULVIHILL - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

Princeton University officials decided Monday to make available a meningitis vaccine that hasn't been approved in the U.S. to stop the spread of the sometimes deadly disease on campus.                    

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New Bird Flu Strain Infects First Human

November 14, 2013 8:30 am | by MARIA CHENG - AP Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

A strain of bird flu that scientists thought could not infect people has shown up in a Taiwanese woman, a nasty surprise that shows scientists must do more to spot worrisome flu strains before they ignite a global outbreak, doctors say.    

Resistance to Malaria Drugs Spreading in SE Asia

November 12, 2013 3:05 am | by Matthew Pennington -- ASSOCIATED PRESS | News | Comments

U.S. experts are raising the alarm over the spread of drug-resistant malaria in several Southeast Asian countries, endangering major global gains in fighting the mosquito-borne disease that kills more than 600,000 people annually.     

Oman Reports First MERS-linked Death

November 11, 2013 10:35 am | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

Oman says officials are widening health checks following the country's first death blamed on a SARS-like virus that has been centered in neighboring Saudi Arabia.                         

Halloween Special: SARS Pandemic Had Batty Origins

October 31, 2013 12:28 pm | News | Comments

 Ten years after the SARS outbreak, scientists have uncovered genome sequences of a new virus closely related to the SARS coronavirus that erupted in Asia in 2002 to 2003, which caused a global pandemic crisis.          

Origins of Deadly Swine Virus Tracked to China

October 23, 2013 1:25 pm | News | Comments

Veterinary researchers have helped identify the origin and possible evolution of an emerging swine virus with high mortality rates that has already spread to at least 17 states. They have traced the recent U.S. outbreaks to a strain from the Anhui province in China.

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DNA Links Mysterious Yeti to Ancient Polar Bear

October 17, 2013 3:26 pm | by JILL LAWLESS - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

DNA analysis conducted by a British genetics professor suggests that he has solved the mystery of the Abominable Snowman— the elusive ape-like creature of the Himalayas. He thinks it's a bear.               

Computer Models Win Chemistry Nobel

October 9, 2013 11:07 am | by Karl Ritter and Malin Rising, Associated Press | News | Comments

Three U.S.-based scientists won this year's Nobel Prize in chemistry on Wednesday for developing powerful computer models that researchers use to understand complex chemical interactions and create new drugs.           

Lab-treated Tissues Allow Infertile Woman to Give Birth

September 30, 2013 3:26 pm | by MALCOLM RITTER - AP Science Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

A 30-year-old infertile woman gave birth after surgeons removed her ovaries and re-implanted tissue they treated in a lab, researchers report. The experimental technique was only tried in a small group of Japanese women with a specific kind of infertility problem, but scientists hope it can also help women who have trouble getting pregnant due to age.

160 Quarantined After Plague Death in Kyrgyzstan

August 28, 2013 9:49 am | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

Four people have been hospitalized and 160 quarantined after a 15-year-old boy who ate marmot meat died of the bubonic plague last week, the Kyrgyz Ministry of Health said today. The ministry in the Central Asian nation said the boy told medics he spent the previous week camping in the mountains where he had eaten barbecued marmot, a large ground squirrel that typically lives in mountainous areas.

Shining Stem Cells Reveals How Our Skin is Maintained

August 15, 2013 2:33 pm | News | Comments

All organs in our body rely on stem cells in order to maintain their function. The skin is our largest organ and forms a shield against the environment. New research results from BRIC, University of Copenhagen and Cambridge University, challenge current stem cell models and explains how the skin is maintained throughout life.

Who Benefits from Vitamin D?

August 13, 2013 1:27 pm | News | Comments

Studying the expression of genes that are dependent on vitamin D makes it possible to identify individuals who will benefit from vitamin D supplementation. Population-based studies have shown that vitamin D deficiency may increase the risk for chronic diseases and weaken the body's immune system.

New Strategy to Disarm the Dengue Virus

August 13, 2013 1:15 pm | News | Comments

A new strategy that cripples the ability of the dengue virus to escape the host immune system has been discovered by A*STAR’s Singapore Immunology Network (SIgN). This strategy could lead to the world’s first universal dengue vaccine candidate that can give full protection from all four serotypes of the virus.

MERS Virus Linked to Camels

August 8, 2013 5:07 pm | by MARIA CHENG - AP Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

Scientists have found an intriguing clue that suggests camels might somehow be involved in infecting people in the Middle East with the mysterious MERS virus. Since the virus was first identified last September, there have been 94 illnesses, including 46 deaths, from MERS, or Middle East espiratory syndrome, mostly in Saudi Arabia.

New Bird Flu Can Spread Among People

August 6, 2013 6:52 pm | by MARIA CHENG - AP Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

Chinese scientists have found the strongest evidence yet that a new bird flu strain is sometimes able to spread from person to person, but they are emphasizing that the virus still does not transmit easily. In a new study, Chinese researchers interviewed the family and close friends of a father and daughter both killed by H7N9 in eastern China to figure out how the virus might have spread between them.

Air Pollution Cut Lifespans in China

July 8, 2013 3:53 pm | by LOUISE WATT - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

A new study links heavy air pollution from coal burning to shorter lives in northern China. Researchers estimate that the half-billion people alive there in the 1990s will live an average of 5½ years less than their southern counterparts because they breathed dirtier air.

J&J Recalls 32M Contraceptive Packages

June 4, 2013 1:28 pm | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

Johnson & Johnson is conducting a voluntary recall of millions of oral contraceptive packages in 43 countries outside the U.S., but says there's a "very low" risk that the flawed tablets could cause unplanned pregnancies. It's the latest in a series of about 40 product recalls announced by the U.S.-based company since 2009.

Stinky Feet Scent May Lead to Better Malaria Traps

June 4, 2013 5:27 am | by MARIA CHENG - AP Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

For decades, health officials have battled malaria with insecticides, bed nets and drugs. Now, scientists say there might be a potent new tool to fight the deadly mosquito-borne disease: The stench of human feet. In a laboratory study, researchers found that mosquitoes infected with the tropical disease were more attracted to human odors from a dirty sock than those that didn't carry malaria.

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