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Study Predicts Hepatitis C Will Become a Rare Disease in 22 Years

August 5, 2014 2:06 pm | News | Comments

Effective new drugs and screening would make hepatitis C a rare disease by 2036, according to a computer simulation conducted by The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center and the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health.

Obesity Paradox in Survival from Sepsis

August 5, 2014 1:51 pm | News | Comments

University of Michigan Health System researchers revealed an obesity paradox among older Americans suffering from sepsis. In a study of 1,404 Medicare beneficiaries, heavier patients were more likely to survive the life-threatening infection that can lead to a stay in a hospital’s intensive care unit.

Smart Bacteria Help Each Other Survive

August 5, 2014 1:47 pm | News | Comments

The body’s assailants are cleverer than previously thought. New research from Lund University in Sweden shows for the first time how bacteria in the airways can help each other replenish vital iron. The bacteria thereby increase their chances of survival, which can happen at the expense of the person’s health.

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Toledo Mayor Lifts Water Ban

August 4, 2014 10:22 am | by John Seewer - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

A water ban that had hundreds of thousands of people in Ohio and Michigan scrambling for drinking water has been lifted, Toledo's mayor announced Monday.                           

Ebola Vaccine Not Far Away

August 4, 2014 9:22 am | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

The nation's top infectious disease official says there's hope that a vaccine against Ebola will be available as early as next July. Dr. Anthony Fauci of the National Institutes of Health says such a preventive vaccine has been successfully tested with monkeys.

Molecule Enhances Copper’s Lethal Punch Against Microbes

July 31, 2014 3:11 pm | News | Comments

Harnessing a natural process in the body that pumps lethal doses of copper to fungi and bacteria shows promise as a new way to kill infectious microbes, a team of scientists report.                   

Dissolvable Fabric Loaded with Medicine Might Offer Faster Protection Against HIV

July 31, 2014 9:27 am | News | Comments

University of Washington bioengineers have discovered a potentially faster way to deliver a topical drug that protects women from contracting HIV. Their method spins the drug into silk-like fibers that quickly dissolve when in contact with moisture, releasing higher doses of the drug than possible with other topical materials such as gels or creams.

Officials: Little Risk of Ebola Outbreak in U.S.

July 29, 2014 8:21 am | by Mike Stobbe - AP Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

U.S. health officials are monitoring the Ebola outbreak in Africa but say the risk of the deadly germ spreading to the United States is remote. The Centers for Disease Control on Monday sent a health alert to U.S. doctors about the outbreak.   

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Scientists ID New Mechanism of Drug Resistance

July 28, 2014 11:24 am | News | Comments

Microorganisms can evade treatment by acquiring mutations in the genes targeted by antibiotics or antifungal drugs. Now, a new study has shown that microorganisms can use a temporary silencing of drug targets to gain the benefits of drug resistance without the commitment.

Nigeria Death Shows Ebola Can Spread by Air Travel

July 28, 2014 8:21 am | by Heather Murdock - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

Nigerian health authorities raced to stop the spread of Ebola on Saturday after a man sick with one of the world's deadliest diseases brought it by plane to Lagos, Africa's largest city with 21 million people.            

Fist Bumps Less Germy Than Handshakes

July 28, 2014 12:15 am | by Mike Stobbe - AP Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

When it comes to preventing the spread of germs, maybe the president is on to something with his fondness for fist bumps. The familiar knocking of knuckles spreads only one-twentieth the amount of bacteria that a handshake does, researchers report.

Powerful HIV Antibodies May Require Assist from Second Antibody to Develop

July 25, 2014 1:40 pm | News | Comments

One strategy for developing a highly effective HIV vaccine is to learn how some HIV-infected people naturally develop antibodies that can stop a high percentage of global HIV strains from infecting human cells in the laboratory. These so-called broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) develop too late to help infected people overcome the virus.

China Lifts Quarantine in Plague City

July 24, 2014 1:20 am | News | Comments

A nine-day quarantine imposed on parts of a northern Chinese city where a man there died of bubonic plague has been lifted, China's official news agency reported Thursday.                       

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Head of Troubled CDC Anthrax Lab Resigns

July 23, 2014 1:20 pm | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

Health officials say that the head of the government lab which potentially exposed workers to live anthrax has resigned. Michael Farrell was head of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention lab since 2009.            

Parts of Chinese City Sealed for Bubonic Plague

July 22, 2014 11:20 pm | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

Parts of a northern Chinese city have been quarantined after state media said a man there died of bubonic plague. The Chinese news agency Xinhua said Tuesday that 151 people were under observation in the city of Yumen in Gansu province after authorities determined they had come in contact with a man who had died of the plague July 16.

Potential New Flu Drugs Target Immune Response, Not Virus

July 22, 2014 2:59 pm | News | Comments

The seriousness of disease often results from the strength of immune response, rather than with the virus, itself. Turning down that response, rather than attacking the virus, might be a better way to reduce that severity. Researchers have taken the first step in doing that for the H7N9 influenza, and their work has led to identification of six potential therapeutics for this highly virulent strain.

Bacteria Swim with Bodies and Flagella

July 22, 2014 2:34 pm | News | Comments

Many bacteria swim using flagella, corkscrew-like appendages that push or pull bacterial cells like propellers. It had been assumed that the flagella do all the work during swimming, while the rest of the cell body is just along for the ride. But new research shows that in at least one species, the cell body is actively carving out a helical trajectory through the water that produces thrust and contributes to the organism's ability to swim.

Researchers Successfully Eliminate the HIV Virus from Cultured Human Cells

July 22, 2014 1:49 pm | Videos | Comments

The HIV-1 virus has proved to be tenacious, inserting its genome permanently into its victims' DNA, forcing patients to take a lifelong drug regimen to control the virus and prevent a fresh attack. Now, a team of Temple University School of Medicine researchers has designed a way to snip out the integrated HIV-1 genes for good.

New Findings Show Early Seeding of HIV Viral Reservoir

July 21, 2014 11:13 am | News | Comments

A research team has demonstrated that the viral reservoir of HIV-1 infection is established strikingly early after intrarectal simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection of rhesus monkeys and before detectable viremia.         

Managing Ecosystems via Genomics

July 18, 2014 2:11 pm | News | Comments

A cross-disciplinary team is calling for public discussion about a potential new way to solve longstanding global ecological problems by using an emerging technology called “gene drives.” The advance could potentially lead to powerful new ways of combating malaria and other insect-borne diseases.

Scientists Find Way to Trap, Kill Malaria Parasite

July 17, 2014 10:20 am | News | Comments

Scientists may be able to entomb the malaria parasite in a prison of its own making, researchers at are reporting. The malaria parasite is among the world’s deadliest pathogens.                     

300 Vials Labeled Influenza, Dengue Found at Lab

July 16, 2014 6:20 pm | by Matthew Perrone - AP Health Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

The same federal scientist who recently found forgotten samples of smallpox at a federal lab also uncovered over 300 additional vials, many bearing the names of highly contagious viruses and bacteria.               

Team Studies Immune Response of Asian Elephants Infected with a Human Disease

July 16, 2014 1:51 pm | News | Comments

Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the organism that causes tuberculosis in humans, also afflicts Asian elephants. Diagnosing and treating elephants with TB is a challenge, however, as little is known about how their immune systems respond to the infection. A new study begins to address this knowledge gap, and offers new tools for detecting and monitoring TB in captive elephants.

Protein's 'Hands' Enable Bacteria to Establish Infection

July 16, 2014 10:01 am | News | Comments

When it comes to infecting humans and animals, bacteria need a helping hand. Biochemists have found the helping hand: groups of tiny protein loops on the surface of cells.                       

When Good Gut Bacteria Get Sick

July 14, 2014 11:46 am | News | Comments

Being sick due to an infection can make us feel lousy. But what must the ecosystem of bacteria, or microbiota, colonizing our guts be going through when hit with infection? A new study has utilized unique computational models to show how infection can affect bacteria that naturally live in our intestines.

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