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Variety Show

January 29, 2015 3:15 pm | by Stephanie Dutchen, Harvard Medical School | News | Comments

Researchers have begun to appreciate the importance of copy number variation when considering the connections between DNA and disease.                     

Arizona Monitoring Hundreds for Measles Linked to Disneyland

January 29, 2015 2:27 pm | by Felicia Fonseca - Associated Press | News | Comments

A measles outbreak in Arizona that originated at California's Disney parks is at risk of...

WHO: Ebola Response Shifts to Ending Epidemic

January 29, 2015 2:23 pm | by Maria Cheng - AP Medical Writer | News | Comments

The U.N. health agency said the three most affected countries - Guinea, Sierra Leone and Liberia...

Researchers Design Tailored Tissue Adhesives

January 28, 2015 2:47 pm | by Anne Trafton, MIT | News | Comments

After undergoing surgery to remove diseased sections of the colon, up to 30 percent of patients...

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By Taking a Rest, Exhausted T Cells Live to Fight Another Day

January 26, 2015 9:56 am | by Howard Hughes Medical Institute | News | Comments

Killer T cells are one of the body's main lines of defense against pathogens.                               

Millions of GMO Insects Could Be Released in Florida Keys

January 26, 2015 9:26 am | by Jennifer Kay - Associated Press | News | Comments

Millions of genetically modified mosquitoes could be released in the Florida Keys if British researchers win approval to use the bugs against two extremely painful viral diseases.              

WHO Adopts Reforms to Repair Reputation after Bungling Ebola

January 26, 2015 9:20 am | by Maria Cheng - AP Medical Writer | News | Comments

The World Health Organization has proposed reforms that could overhaul its structure after botching the response to the biggest-ever Ebola outbreak.                   

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Tide Turning in Ebola Fight After Hard Lessons

January 26, 2015 9:15 am | by Krista Larson and Maria Cheng - Associated Press | News | Comments

A top U.N. official in the fight against Ebola greeted just three patients at one treatment center he visited this week in Sierra Leone.                     

Long-Awaited Ebola Vaccine Study Coming Soon in Liberia

January 22, 2015 4:38 pm | by Lauran Neergard - AP Medical Writer | News | Comments

Long-awaited studies of two possible Ebola vaccines are set to begin in West Africa in a couple of weeks.                          

New Govt Standards Target Pathogens in Poultry Products

January 22, 2015 10:41 am | by Mary Clare Jalonick, Associated Press | News | Comments

Standards proposed by the Agriculture Department aim to reduce rates of salmonella and campylobacter, another pathogen that can cause symptoms similar to salmonella, in chicken parts, ground chicken and ground turkey. The standards would be voluntary but designed to pressure companies to take steps to reduce contamination.

Lysosome Dysfunction Linked to Infant Failure to Thrive

January 22, 2015 10:31 am | by Northwestern Medicine | News | Comments

Neonatal intestinal disorders that prevent infants from getting the nutrients they need may be caused by defects in the lysosomal system that occur before weaning, according to a new Northwestern Medicine study.                        

Disney Parks-Linked Measles Outbreak Grows to 70 Cases

January 22, 2015 10:05 am | by Alicia Chang, Associated Press | News | Comments

Seventy people have been infected in a measles outbreak that led California public health officials to urge those who haven't been vaccinated against the disease, including children too young to be immunized, should avoid Disney parks where the spread originated.

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New Information on Relatively Unknown Blood Borne Bacteria

January 20, 2015 3:39 pm | by University of Bristol | News | Comments

Haemoplasmas are a group of blood borne bacteria found in a wide range of mammals, including domestic and wild cats, and can cause severe anaemia. The findings of a new study have significantly advanced researchers’ knowledge of immunity for these pathogens.

Tumor-Causing Virus Widespread in Wild Turkey

January 20, 2015 10:33 am | by Mary Esch, Associated Press | News | Comments

Wildlife biologists tracking a tumor-causing virus first diagnosed in eastern wild turkeys five years ago have found the virus is far more widespread - but less deadly - than expected.                             

Eradicating Ebola: What Will It Take?

January 20, 2015 10:25 am | by Ryan Bushey, Associate Editor | Articles | Comments

These factors may not be enough to finally end the Ebola epidemic in West Africa.                              

Human Mode of Responding to HIV Vaccine Conserved from Monkeys

January 16, 2015 2:25 pm | by Duke Medicine | News | Comments

The antibody response from an HIV vaccine trial in Thailand was made possible by a genetic trait carried over in humans from an ancient ancestry with monkeys and apes.                

Measles Pops Up in Outbreak Linked to Disney Parks

January 16, 2015 1:57 pm | by Alicia Chang - AP Science Writer | News | Comments

The highly contagious respiratory illness was declared eliminated in the U.S. in 2000, but health officials have seen a surge of measles infections in the country in recent years.              

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Red-Hot Coverage for Study: “Cold Noses Cause Colds"

January 15, 2015 9:46 am | by Cynthia Fox, Science Writer | Articles | Comments

Colds can come from cold noses, according to a high-profile study in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS).                                          

Iron Overload Disease Causes Rapid Bacteria Growth

January 15, 2015 9:40 am | by UCLA | News | Comments

Every summer, the news reports on a bacterium called Vibrio vulnificus found in warm saltwater that causes people to get sick, or die, after they eat raw tainted shellfish or when an open wound comes in contact with seawater.                                      

Ancient Fossils Reveal Risk of Parasitic Infections Due to Climate Change

January 13, 2015 4:00 pm | by University of Missouri | News | Comments

Biologists found indications of a greater risk of parasitic infection due to climate change in ancient mollusk fossils.                        

Mucus Proteins May Control Asthma

January 13, 2015 3:16 pm | by Nora Dunne, Northwestern University | News | Comments

Scientists have revealed that sugars on a specific mucus protein can induce eosinophil death and help combat asthma.                        

CDC Pushes Antiviral Meds as Flu Becomes More Widespread

January 12, 2015 8:58 am | by Mike Stobbe - AP Medical Writer | News | Comments

In the midst of a worrisome flu season, health officials are pushing doctors to prescribe antiviral medicines more often.                       

Study Links Common Human Protein to Adverse Parasitic Worm Infections

January 8, 2015 5:10 pm | by University of Calilfornia, Riverside | News | Comments

Worm infections represent a major global public health problem, leading to a variety of debilitating diseases and conditions, such as anemia, elephantiasis, growth retardation and dysentery. Several drugs are available to treat worm infections, but reinfection is high especially in developing countries.

The Best Offense Against Bacteria is a Good Defense

January 7, 2015 4:17 pm | by Ohio State University | News | Comments

A small protein active in the human immune response can disable bacterial toxins by exploiting a property that makes the toxins effective.                     

Research Findings Have Implications for Regenerating Damaged Nerve Cells

January 7, 2015 4:07 pm | by University of Colorado, Boulder | News | Comments

Two new studies have identified a unique molecule that not only gobbles up bad cells, but also has the ability to repair damaged nerve cells.                    

How Bacteria Control Their Size

January 7, 2015 9:21 am | by WUSTL | News | Comments

Scientists have traditionally studied bacteria in large numbers, not individually. Working with tens of millions of cells in a culture flask, they tracked their growth by looking at how much the cells dimmed light passing through a tube.

Nestlé Health Science Invests $65M in Microbiome Therapy Startup

January 6, 2015 12:01 pm | News | Comments

The investment made by Nestle Health Science, a subsidiary of Nestle, will help fund the next stage of development for the startup's CDI treatment.                   

New Version of Antibiotic Could Eliminate Risk of Hearing Loss

January 5, 2015 10:22 am | by Tracie White, Stanford University | News | Comments

Researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine report that they have developed a modified version of an aminoglycoside that works effectively in mice without the risk of causing deafness or kidney damage, another common side effect.

CDC Begins Search for Lab Safety Chief

January 2, 2015 4:29 pm | by Ryan Bushey, Associate Editor | Articles | Comments

The CDC is creating this position after several embarrasing mishaps with hazardous material last year.                           

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