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Michigan Man Among First to Get 'Bionic Eye'

April 23, 2014 3:18 am | by Mike Householder - Associated Press | News | Comments

Diagnosed with retinitis pigmentosa as a teenager, Roger Pontz has been almost completely blind for years. Now, thanks to a high-tech procedure that involved the surgical implantation of a "bionic eye," he's regained enough of his eyesight to catch small glimpses of his wife, grandson and cat.

Killing Cancer on the Run

April 22, 2014 3:30 pm | by Skip Derra | Articles | Comments

A dream solution to cancer metastasis has been to develop a method that can track and kill the...

Child’s Autism Risk Accelerates with Mother’s Age, Study Says

April 22, 2014 3:21 pm | News | Comments

Older parents are more likely to have a child who develops an autism spectrum disorder (ASD)...

CT Measures Potentially Dangerous Arterial Plaque in Diabetic Patients

April 22, 2014 3:04 pm | News | Comments

Imaging of the coronary arteries with computed tomography angiography provides an accurate...

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Fast Way to Measure DNA Repair

April 22, 2014 2:57 pm | News | Comments

A team of researchers has developed a test that can rapidly assess several DNA repair systems, which could help determine individuals’ risk of developing cancer and help doctors predict how a given patient will respond to chemotherapy drugs.   

Brain Size Matters in Animal Self-control

April 22, 2014 2:47 pm | Videos | Comments

Scientists collaborated on the first large-scale investigation into the evolution of self-control in animals, defined in the study as the ability to inhibit powerful but ultimately counter-productive behavior.            

Lab Turns Skin Cells into Human Airway Tissue

April 22, 2014 12:25 pm | News | Comments

Using reprogrammed skin cells, researchers have for the first time used stem cell techniques to grow fully functional assemblies of the cells that line airways leading to the lungs.                    

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Brain Activity Observed in Real Time

April 22, 2014 12:14 pm | News | Comments

Scientists have worked together to create tools for observing nerves in living animals that signal between themselves in real time, which will help them understand how those individual signals add up to the complex collection of a person's thoughts and memories.

Breaking News: Sleep Disorder Linked to Brain Diseases

April 22, 2014 8:58 am | News | Comments

Researchers say that rapid-eye-movement sleep behavior disorder (RBD), which causes people to act out their dreams, is the best current predictor of brain diseases like Parkinson's and Alzheimer's.               

Muscle Weakness in Alcoholism Linked to Mitochondrial Repair Issues

April 21, 2014 2:49 pm | News | Comments

Muscle weakness from long-term alcoholism may stem from an inability of mitochondria, the powerhouses of cells, to self-repair, according to a new study. In the research, scientists found evidence that chronic heavy alcohol use affects a gene involved in mitochondrial repair and muscle regeneration.

'Molecular Tweezer' is a Step Toward Parkinson’s Treatment

April 21, 2014 2:43 pm | Videos | Comments

The most effective way to tackle debilitating diseases is to punch them at the start and keep them from growing. Research shows that a small “molecular tweezer” keeps proteins from clumping, the first step of disorders such as Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease and Huntington’s disease.

Cancer Stem Cells Linked to Drug Resistance

April 21, 2014 2:25 pm | News | Comments

Most drugs used to treat lung, breast and pancreatic cancers also promote drug-resistance and ultimately spur tumor growth. Researchers have discovered a biomarker called CD61 that appears responsible for inducing tumor metastasis by enhancing the stem cell-like properties of cancer cells.

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Scientists ID Source of Most Bladder Cancer Cases

April 21, 2014 2:15 pm | News | Comments

A single type of cell in the lining of the bladder is responsible for most cases of invasive bladder cancer, according to researchers. This study is the first to pinpoint the normal cell type that can give rise to invasive bladder cancers.   

Turning Science on its Head

April 21, 2014 2:07 pm | News | Comments

Neuroscientists have made a discovery that turns 160 years of neuroanatomy on its head. Myelin, the electrical insulating material in the body long known to be essential for the fast transmission of impulses along the axons of nerve cells, is not as ubiquitous as thought, according to new work.

Bulletproof Nuclei? Stem Cells Exhibit Unusual Absorption

April 21, 2014 12:39 pm | News | Comments

Stem cells demonstrate a bizarre property never before seen at a cellular level, according to a new study. The property– known as auxeticity– is one which may have application as wide-ranging as soundproofing, super-absorbent sponges and bulletproof vests.

Ginseng Can Treat, Prevent Influenza

April 21, 2014 12:17 pm | News | Comments

Ginseng can help treat and prevent influenza and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), a respiratory virus that infects the lungs and breathing passages, according to new research findings.                   

Down Syndrome, Leukemia Link Uncovered

April 21, 2014 11:48 am | News | Comments

Although doctors have long known that people with Down syndrome have a heightened risk of developing acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) during childhood, they haven’t been able to explain why. Now, a team investigators has uncovered a connection between the two conditions.

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Vitamin B3 Might Have Been Made in Space, Delivered to Earth by Meteorites

April 18, 2014 1:55 pm | News | Comments

Ancient Earth might have had an extraterrestrial supply of vitamin B3 delivered by carbon-rich meteorites, according to a new analysis by NASA-funded researchers. The result supports a theory that the origin of life may have been assisted by a supply of key molecules created in space and brought to Earth by comet and meteor impacts.

Building 'Smart' Cell-Based Therapies

April 18, 2014 1:38 pm | News | Comments

A Northwestern synthetic biology team has created a new technology for modifying human cells to create programmable therapeutics that could travel the body and selectively target cancer and other sites of disease. Engineering cell-based, biological devices that monitor and modify human physiology is a promising frontier in clinical synthetic biology, but no existing technology enabled bioengineers to build such devices.

Deadly Human Pathogen Cryptococcus Fully Sequenced

April 18, 2014 12:36 pm | News | Comments

Researchers have sequenced the entire genome and all the RNA products of the most important pathogenic lineage of Cryptococcus neoformans, a strain called H99.                           

Researchers Develop New Model of Cellular Movement

April 18, 2014 12:27 pm | News | Comments

Cell movement plays an important role in a host of biological functions from embryonic development to repairing wounded tissue. A new study deepens the understanding of a pair of proteins– vinculin and actin– that work together to allow a cell to migrate throughout the body. 

Chronic Inflammation May Be Linked to Aggressive Prostate Cancer

April 18, 2014 12:11 pm | News | Comments

The presence of chronic inflammation in benign prostate tissue was associated with high-grade, or aggressive, prostate cancer, and this association was found even in those with low prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels, according to a new study.

Protein Essential for Fertilization Discovered

April 17, 2014 1:06 pm | Videos | Comments

Researchers have discovered interacting proteins on the surface of the sperm and the egg essential to begin mammalian life. These proteins offer new paths towards improved fertility treatments and the development of new contraceptives.     

Scientists Explain How Memories Stick Together

April 17, 2014 12:46 pm | News | Comments

Scientists have created a new model of memory that explains how neurons retain select memories a few hours after an event. This new framework provides a more complete picture of how memory works, which can inform research into disorders liked Parkinson's and Alzheimer's.

Groundbreaking MRI Scan Shows Brown Fat in Tissues

April 17, 2014 12:22 pm | News | Comments

Researchers used an MRI-based method to identify and confirm the presence of brown adipose tissue in a living adult, which could prove to be an essential step towards a new wave of therapies to aid the fight against diabetes and obesity.   

Ebola Virus in Africa Outbreak is New Strain

April 16, 2014 5:21 pm | by Marilynn Marchione - AP Chief Medical Writer | News | Comments

The Ebola virus that has killed scores of people in Guinea this year is a new strain - evidence that the disease did not spread there from outbreaks in some other African nations, scientists report.               

Teenage Concussions Linked to Higher Rates of Suicide Attempts

April 16, 2014 2:04 pm | News | Comments

Teenagers who have suffered a traumatic brain injury such as a concussion are at “significantly greater odds” of attempting suicide, being bullied and engaging in a variety of high risk behaviors, a new study has found.          

Diabetes Cases Nearly Doubled Over Past Two Decades

April 16, 2014 1:52 pm | News | Comments

Cases of diabetes and pre-diabetes in the United States have nearly doubled since 1988, suggests new research, with obesity apparently to blame for the surge.                           

Scientists Discover Brain’s Anti-distraction System

April 16, 2014 1:38 pm | News | Comments

Psychologists have presented the first study to reveal that our brains rely on an active suppression mechanism to avoid being distracted by salient irrelevant information when we want to focus on a particular item or task.         

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