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Past Shows Fragile Bones Result From Physical Inactivity

December 22, 2014 4:32 pm | News | Comments

Latest analysis of prehistoric bones show there is no anatomical reason why a person born today could not develop the skeletal strength of a prehistoric forager or a modern orangutan. Findings support the idea that activity throughout life is the key to building bone strength and preventing osteoporosis risk in later years, say researchers.

New Technology Makes Tissues, Someday Makes Organs

December 22, 2014 4:31 pm | by Brown University | News | Comments

A new instrument could someday build replacement human organs the way electronics are assembled...

Bacteria in Gut May Depend More on Diet than Genes

December 22, 2014 10:49 am | News | Comments

Genes are important, but diet may be even more important in determining the relative abundance...

Meet The Newest Surgeon General

December 22, 2014 10:15 am | by Ryan Bushey, Associate Editor | Articles | Comments

President Obama's pick for the position turned out to be controversial.    ...

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Unable to Prove Claims, “Acid Bath” Stem Cell Researcher Tenders Resignation

December 19, 2014 10:16 am | by Cynthia Fox, Science Writer | Articles | Comments

A young scientist from Harvard University and the Riken Institute, who claimed to make extraordinary stem cells from ordinary cells with acid, has failed to repeat her work.                                  

UCLA to Help Biologists, Doctors Mine 'Big Data'

December 19, 2014 9:45 am | by Eryn Brown, UCLA | News | Comments

Millions upon millions of medical records and test results. Countless DNA sequences. Hard drives stuffed with images of all kinds - pictures of cells, scans of body parts. It's all part of the deluge of information often known as "big data," an ever-growing stockpile of digital material that scientists hope will reveal insights about biology and lead to improvements in medical care.  

Obese Children’s Brains More Responsive to Sugar

December 12, 2014 9:34 am | News | Comments

A new study found that the brains of obese children literally light up differently when tasting sugar. This elevated sense of “food reward” could mean some children have brain circuitries that predispose them to crave more sugar throughout life. 

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Creating ‘Genomic Origami’

December 12, 2014 9:05 am | Videos | Comments

In a triumph for cell biology, researchers have assembled the first high-resolution, 3-D maps of entire folded genomes and found a structural basis for gene regulation, a kind of “genomic origami” that allows the same genome to produce different types of cells.

Scientists Find Way to Boost Healthy Cells During Chemo

December 12, 2014 9:01 am | News | Comments

It’s well known that chemotherapy helps fight cancer. It’s also known that it wreaks havoc on normal, healthy cells. Scientists are closer to discovering a possible way to boost healthy cell production in cancer patients as they receive chemotherapy. 

Discovery May Explain Why We Gain Weight

December 12, 2014 8:57 am | News | Comments

Researchers believe they’re on track to solve the mystery of weight gain – and it has nothing to do with indulging in holiday eggnog. They discovered that a protein, Thy1, has a fundamental role in controlling whether a primitive cell decides to become a fat cell, making Thy1 a possible therapeutic target.

Shedding New Light on Relationship Between Personality, Health

December 12, 2014 8:53 am | News | Comments

Researchers have found new evidence that explains how some aspects of our personality may affect our health and wellbeing, supporting long-observed associations between aspects of human character, physical health and longevity.       

Imaging and Analysis with Flying Colors: Part Two

December 12, 2014 8:30 am | by Mark Clymer, Datacolor Inc., and Jerry Sedgewick, Imaging and Analysis | Articles | Comments

The dictionary definition that a “picture is a representation of a person or scene” just doesn’t apply to those images produced in scientific research and from clinical specimens. It would be more accurate to describe these images in one word: artifact.

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Alcohol Interferes with the Body's Ability to Regulate Sleep

December 11, 2014 8:30 am | News | Comments

Researchers have found that drinking alcohol to fall asleep interferes with sleep homeostasis, the body’s sleep-regulating mechanism.                                 

Meniscus Regenerated with 3-D-printed Implant

December 11, 2014 8:30 am | Videos | Comments

Researchers have devised a way to replace the knee’s protective lining, called the meniscus, using a personalized 3-D-printed implant, or scaffold, infused with human growth factors that prompt the body to regenerate the lining on its own.    

Testosterone May Contribute to Colon Cancer Tumor Growth

December 11, 2014 8:30 am | News | Comments

Researchers have found evidence suggesting that the male hormone testosterone may actually be a contributing factor in the formation of colon cancer tumors.                           

Brain Inflammation a Hallmark of Autism

December 11, 2014 8:30 am | News | Comments

While many different combinations of genetic traits can cause autism, brains affected by autism share a pattern of ramped-up immune responses, an analysis of data from autopsied human brains revealed.               

Ebola Fighters Named Time Person of the Year

December 11, 2014 8:30 am | by Kiley Armstrong - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

Doctors, nurses and others fighting Ebola through "tireless acts of courage and mercy" have been named Time's 2014 Person of the Year, the magazine announced Wednesday.                       

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Viewing Your Genome on a Blackberry Passport

December 10, 2014 1:15 pm | Videos | Comments

One of the recurring themes of the 2014 Forbes Healthcare Summit was that smartphones and mobile apps would play a larger role in the industry. However, the safety and security of these platforms are being debated. Nanthealth’s CEO Dr. Patrick Soon-Shiong feels he may have a solution.

New ‘Electronic Skin’ for Prosthetics, Robotics

December 10, 2014 12:57 pm | News | Comments

For the first time, scientists report the development of a stretchable “electronic skin” closely modeled after our own that can detect not just pressure, but also what direction it’s coming from.               

Cognitive Training Can Mitigate Effects of Poverty

December 10, 2014 12:15 pm | News | Comments

The cognitive effects of poverty can be mitigated during middle school with a targeted intervention, according to new research.                                  

Worm's Mental GPS Helps Them Find Food

December 10, 2014 12:08 pm | News | Comments

Scientists have developed a mathematical theory–based on roundworm foraging that predicts how animals decide to switch from localized to very broad searching.                          

Sierra Leone Area to Hold Two-week Ebola 'Lockdown'

December 10, 2014 11:58 am | by Clarence Roy-MaCaulay - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

Authorities in an eastern district of Sierra Leone launched a two-week "lockdown" on Wednesday, hoping to halt the spread of Ebola after the area recorded seven confirmed cases in a day.                   

Laughing Gas Studied as Depression Treatment

December 10, 2014 11:50 am | News | Comments

Nitrous oxide, or laughing gas, has shown early promise as a potential treatment for severe depression in patients whose symptoms don’t respond to standard therapies.                        

Blocking Receptor in Brain’s Immune Cells Counters Alzheimer’s in Mice

December 10, 2014 11:38 am | News | Comments

Brain cells called microglia chew up toxic substances and cell debris, calm inflammation and make nerve-cell-nurturing substances. New research shows that keeping them on the job may prevent neurodegeneration.            

Using Genome Sequencing to Track MRSA in Under-resourced Hospitals

December 10, 2014 11:15 am | News | Comments

Whole genome sequencing of MRSA from a hospital in Asia has demonstrated patterns of transmission in a resource-limited setting, where formal screening procedures are not feasible.                    

Allen Institute Snags $100M to Create Cell Science Institute

December 9, 2014 3:04 pm | News | Comments

Philanthropist and entrepreneur Paul G. Allen announced a commitment of $100 million to create the Allen Institute for Cell Science in Seattle. The Allen Institute for Cell Science will take a multidisciplinary, team science-driven approach to understanding a fundamental and yet elusive question in cell science.

Next Steps Uncertain for Women with Dense Breasts

December 9, 2014 8:30 am | by Lauran Neergaard - AP Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

More women are learning their breasts are so dense that it's more difficult for mammograms to spot cancer. But new research suggests automatically giving them an extra test isn't necessarily the solution.             

Preeclampsia During Pregnancy Linked to Greater Autism Risk

December 9, 2014 8:30 am | Videos | Comments

Children with autism spectrum disorder were more than twice as likely to have been exposed in utero to preeclampsia, and the likelihood of an autism diagnosis was even greater if the mother experienced more severe disease, a large study has found.

A Pill to Shed Fat?

December 9, 2014 8:30 am | News | Comments

Researchers have taken what they describe as “the first step toward a pill that can replace the treadmill” for the control of obesity, though that shift, of course, would not provide all of the many benefits of exercise.         

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