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Ebola Death Rate Rises to 70%

October 14, 2014 1:03 pm | by Maria Cheng - AP Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

West Africa could face up to 10,000 new Ebola cases a week within two months, the World Health Organization warned Tuesday, adding that the death rate in the current outbreak has risen to 70 percent.               

Exercise Can Improve Memory in People Over 60

October 14, 2014 12:53 pm | News | Comments

A new study shows that physical activity can improve memory performance in older people through increasing volume and blood flow in an area of the brain called hippocampus.                       

Damage to Brain ‘Hubs’ Causes Extensive Impairment

October 14, 2014 12:41 pm | News | Comments

Injuries to six brain areas are much more devastating to patients’ abilities to think and adapt to everyday challenges than damage to other parts of the brain, scientists have learned.                    

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ALS Progression Linked to Increased Protein Instability

October 14, 2014 12:28 pm | News | Comments

A new study suggests a cause of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease. The study provides evidence that those proteins linked to more severe forms of the disease are less stable structurally and more prone to form clusters or aggregates.

Stress May be Harder on Women’s Hearts than Men’s

October 14, 2014 12:20 pm | News | Comments

Researchers have known for decades that stress contributes to heart disease. But a new analysis shows mental stress may tax women’s hearts more than men’s.                           

Cellular 'Snooze Button' Advances Cancer, Biofuel Research

October 14, 2014 11:48 am | News | Comments

The discovery of a cellular snooze button has allowed a team of scientists to potentially improve biofuel production and offer insight on the early stages of cancer.                         

Chemical from Broccoli Sprouts Promising Against Autism

October 14, 2014 11:41 am | News | Comments

Results of a small clinical trial suggest that a chemical derived from broccoli sprouts— and best known for claims that it can help prevent certain cancers— may ease classic behavioral symptoms in those with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs).   

Bacterial Defense Policies

October 13, 2014 2:14 pm | News | Comments

A research team has used high-resolution cryo-electron microscopy to obtain novel insights into the ultrastructural changes in an intracellular machine associated with the acquisition of resistance to the antibiotic erythromycin.      

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Bioinspired Coating Repels Blood, Bacteria from Medical Devices

October 13, 2014 2:03 pm | News | Comments

A team of scientists and engineers developed a new surface coating for medical devices using materials already approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The coating repelled blood from more than 20 medically relevant substrates the team tested.

Scientists Sniff Out Unexpected Role for Stem Cells in the Brain

October 13, 2014 1:09 pm | Videos | Comments

Scientists report that newly formed brain cells in the mouse olfactory system— the area that processes smells— play a critical role in maintaining proper connections.                        

Sensors to Simplify Diabetes Management

October 13, 2014 12:50 pm | News | Comments

For many patients diagnosed with diabetes, treating the disease can mean a burdensome and uncomfortable lifelong routine of monitoring blood sugar levels and injecting the insulin that their bodies don't naturally produce. Now, tiny biosensors are being developed that could one day eliminate the need for these manual blood sugar tests.

Ebola is Modern Era's Worst Health Emergency

October 13, 2014 7:37 am | by Jim Gomez - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

The World Health Organization called the Ebola outbreak "the most severe, acute health emergency seen in modern times" on Monday but also said that economic disruptions can be curbed if people are adequately informed to prevent irrational moves to dodge infection.

Can U.S. Hospitals Handle Ebola?

October 13, 2014 4:36 am | by Marilynn Marchione - AP Chief Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

A breach of infection control resulting in a Dallas health worker getting Ebola raises fresh questions about whether hospitals truly can safely take care of people with the deadly virus, as health officials insist is possible.         

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Neural Stem Cell Overgrowth, Autism-like Behavior May be Linked

October 10, 2014 11:36 am | News | Comments

People with autism spectrum disorder often experience a period of accelerated brain growth after birth. No one knows why, or whether the change is linked to any specific behavioral changes. A new mouse study demonstrates how inflammation can trigger an excessive division of neural stem cells that can cause “overgrowth” in offspring’s brain.

Similar but Different: New Discovery for Degenerative Disease

October 10, 2014 11:26 am | News | Comments

Researchers have established how two degenerative diseases that present in similar ways are in fact quite different. Progressive Supranuclear palsy (PSP) and Parkinson’s disease (PD) have overlapping symptoms but remain difficult to distinguish.

New Brain-repairing Mechanism Discovered

October 10, 2014 11:18 am | News | Comments

A previously unknown mechanism through which the brain produces new nerve cells after a stroke has been discovered. The researchers have shown that following an induced stroke in mice, support cells, so-called astrocytes, start to form nerve cells in the injured part of the brain.

Unusual Skin Cancer Linked to Chronic Metal Allergy

October 10, 2014 10:45 am | News | Comments

In rare cases, patients with allergies to metals develop persistent skin rashes after metal devices are implanted near the skin. New research suggests these patients may be at increased risk of an unusual and aggressive form of skin cancer.   

'Good' Fat Can Fight Diabetes

October 10, 2014 10:38 am | Videos | Comments

Scientists have discovered a new class of molecules– produced in human and mouse fat– that protects against diabetes. The researchers found that giving this new fat to mice with the equivalent of type 2 diabetes lowered their elevated blood sugar.

Researchers Begin Ebola Vaccine Study in Africa

October 9, 2014 5:52 pm | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

The first study of a possible Ebola vaccine is underway in Africa: University of Maryland researchers say three health care workers in Mali received the experimental shots.                       

Grapefruit Juice Stems Weight Gain in Mice

October 9, 2014 1:47 pm | News | Comments

Fad diets come and go, but might there be something to the ones that involve consuming grapefruit and grapefruit juice? New research suggests that a closer look at grapefruit juice is warranted.                

RNA Molecules in Urine and Tissue Can Detect Prostate Cancer

October 9, 2014 1:40 pm | News | Comments

Researchers have identified a set of RNA molecules that are detectable in tissue samples and urine of prostate cancer patients, but not in normal healthy individuals.                         

Why Do People Risk Infection from Bat Meat?

October 9, 2014 1:25 pm | News | Comments

Ebola, as with many emerging infections, is likely to have arisen due to man’s interaction with wild animals and eating wild meat known as bushmeat. A new survey of people across southern Ghana aims to find out what drives consumption of bat bushmeat, and how people perceive the risks associated with the practice.

Restoring Familiar Sensations to Amputees

October 9, 2014 1:05 pm | Videos | Comments

Even before he lost his right hand to an industrial accident four years ago, Igor Spetic had family open his medicine bottles. Cotton balls give him goose bumps. Now, blindfolded during an experiment, he feels his arm hairs raise when a researcher brushes the back of his prosthetic hand with a cotton ball.

Autism as a Disorder of Prediction

October 9, 2014 12:10 pm | News | Comments

Autism is characterized by many different symptoms: difficulty interacting with others, repetitive behaviors, and hypersensitivity to sound and other stimuli. Neuroscientists have put forth a new hypothesis that accounts for these behaviors and may provide a neurological foundation for many of the disparate features of the disorder.

Gene Therapy for ‘Bubble Boy’ Disease Appears Effective, Safe

October 9, 2014 11:49 am | News | Comments

A new form of gene therapy for boys with X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency syndrome (SCID-X1), a life-threatening condition also known as “bubble boy” disease, appears to be both effective and safe, according to new research.     

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