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Cinnamon Could Halt Progression of Parkinson’s

July 9, 2014 10:26 am | News | Comments

Neurological scientists have found that using cinnamon, a common food spice and flavoring material, can reverse the biomechanical, cellular and anatomical changes that occur in the brains of mice with Parkinson’s disease (PD).       

Forgotten Vials of Smallpox Found in Storage Room

July 9, 2014 8:30 am | by Mike Stobbe, AP Medical Writer | News | Comments

A government scientist cleaning out an old storage room at a research center near Washington made a startling discovery last week- decades-old vials of smallpox packed away and forgotten in a cardboard box.             

AIDS Research Team Loses $1.38M Grant

July 9, 2014 8:30 am | by David Pitt | News | Comments

An AIDS research team at Iowa State University will not get the final $1.38 million payment of a National Institutes of Health five-year grant after a team member admitted last year to faking research results.            

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Protein Discovery is Step Toward Blood Test for Alzheimer's

July 8, 2014 12:27 pm | News | Comments

Scientists have identified a set of 10 proteins in the blood which can predict the onset of Alzheimer’s, marking a significant step towards developing a blood test for the disease.                     

Neandertal Trait Found in Ancient Skull Raises New Evolution Questions

July 8, 2014 12:02 pm | News | Comments

Re-examination of a circa 100,000-year-old archaic early human skull found 35 years ago in Northern China has revealed the surprising presence of an inner-ear formation long thought to occur only in Neandertals.           

Low Doses of Arsenic Cause Cancer in Mice

July 8, 2014 11:50 am | News | Comments

Mice exposed to low doses of arsenic in drinking water, similar to what some people might consume, developed lung cancer, researchers have found. Arsenic is present in the environment as a naturally occurring substance or due to contamination from human activity.

Recalled Chobani Contained Highly Pathogenic Mold

July 8, 2014 11:00 am | News | Comments

Samples isolated from Chobani yogurt that was voluntarily recalled in September 2013 have been found to contain the most virulent form of a fungus called Mucor circinelloides, which is associated with infections in immune-compromised people.   

First Cancer Immunotherapy for Dogs Developed

July 7, 2014 2:51 pm | News | Comments

A few therapies derived from human medicine are available for dogs, but a very successful form of therapy by which antibodies inhibit tumor growth has not yet been available for animals. Now, scientists have developed, for the first time, antibodies to treat cancer in dogs.

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Schizophrenia-associated Gene Variation Affects Brain Cell Development

July 7, 2014 2:46 pm | News | Comments

Researchers have begun to connect the dots between a schizophrenia-linked genetic variation and its effect on the developing brain. Their experiments show that the loss of a particular gene alters the skeletons of developing brain cells, which in turn disrupts the orderly layers those cells would normally form.

High Cholesterol Linked to Breast Cancer Risk

July 7, 2014 11:57 am | News | Comments

An association between high blood cholesterol and breast cancer has been found in a study of more than 1 million patients over a 14-year time period in the UK.                          

Pseudogenes May Provide Clearer Understanding of Biomarkers

July 7, 2014 11:36 am | News | Comments

Researchers completed a study that generated pseudogene expression profiles in 2,808 patient samples representing seven cancer types. The results indicated that the science of pseudogene expression analysis may very well play a key role in explaining how cancer occurs.

Scientists Find Key Piece in Brain Tumor Puzzle

July 7, 2014 11:22 am | News | Comments

Scientists have shown that a member of the protein family known as SUMO (small ubiquitin-like modifier) is a key to why tumor cells multiply uncontrollably, especially in the case of glioblastoma.                

'Nanojuice' Could Improve Gut Exams

July 7, 2014 11:00 am | News | Comments

Located deep in the human gut, the small intestine is not easy to examine. Now, researchers are developing a new imaging technique involving nanoparticles suspended in liquid to form “nanojuice” that patients would drink.         

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Protein in Teeth Promises Bone Regeneration

July 3, 2014 8:30 am | News | Comments

Patients suffering from osteoporosis or bone fractures might benefit from a new discovery of the protein statherin, which plays an important role in bone regeneration.                        

New Reprogramming Method Makes Better Stem Cells

July 3, 2014 8:30 am | News | Comments

A team of researchers has shown for the first time that stem cells created using different methods produce differing cells. The findings provide new insights into the basic biology of stem cells and could ultimately lead to improved therapies.  

Proton Therapy Has Advantages Over IMRT

July 3, 2014 8:30 am | Videos | Comments

A new study by radiation oncologists has found that proton beam therapy significantly improved disease free survival and tumor control when compared to IMRT in a variety of advanced head and neck cancers.               

Genetically Driven Gut Feelings Help Female Flies Choose Mates

July 3, 2014 8:30 am | News | Comments

The elaborate courtship dance done by flies combines multiple motor skills with advanced sensory cues. Remarkably, this behavior is entirely innate. Now, researchers have determined that the Abdominal-B (Abd-B) gene is important for this complex behavior.

Upending a Cancer Dogma

July 2, 2014 1:30 pm | News | Comments

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine say a protein essential to regulating cell cycle progression – the process of cell division and replication – activates a key tumor suppressor, rather than inactivating it as previously thought.

White Bread Helps Boost Some of the Gut’s ‘Good’ Microbes

July 2, 2014 1:11 pm | News | Comments

White-bread lovers take heart. Scientists are now reporting that this much-maligned food seems to encourage the growth of some of our most helpful inhabitants — beneficial gut bacteria. In addition to this surprising find, their study also revealed that when looking at effects of food on our “microbiomes,” considering the whole diet, not just individual ingredients, is critical.

Muscle-powered Bio-bots Walk on Command

July 2, 2014 10:00 am | News | Comments

A new generation of miniature biological robots is flexing its muscle. Engineers have developed a class of walking “bio-bots” powered by muscle cells and controlled with electrical pulses, giving researchers unprecedented command over their function.

Cellular Gates for Sodium, Calcium Controlled by Ancient Element

July 2, 2014 9:46 am | News | Comments

Researchers have spotted a strong family trait in two distant relatives: The channels that permit entry of sodium and calcium ions into cells turn out to share similar means for regulating ion intake, they said.            

Treasure Trove of Genes Key to Kidney Cancer

July 2, 2014 9:24 am | Videos | Comments

A genomic analysis of clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC), the most common form of kidney cancer, from 72 patients has uncovered 31 genes that are key to development, growth and spread of the cancer, according to researchers.      

Lead in Kids’ Blood Linked to Behavioral, Emotional Issues

July 2, 2014 9:17 am | News | Comments

Emotional and behavioral problems show up even with low exposure to lead, and as blood lead levels increase in children, so do the problems, according to new research.                       

NIH Creates Network to Tackle Mysterious Diseases

July 1, 2014 4:20 pm | by Lauran Neergaard - AP Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

The government is expanding its "mystery disease" program, funding a network at six universities around the country to help diagnose patients with diseases so rare they've been told they're undiagnosable. The National Institutes of Health has evaluated hundreds of these cold-case patients in its campus research hospital as part of a pilot program since 2008. Demand is so great, there's a waiting list.  

Marrow Transplants Can Reverse Adult Sickle Cell

July 1, 2014 4:20 pm | by Lindsey Tanner - AP Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

Bone marrow transplants can reverse severe sickle cell disease in adults, a small study by government scientists found, echoing results seen with a similar technique used in children. The researchers and others say the findings show age need not be a barrier and that the technique may change practice for some adult patients when standard treatment fails.

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