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Video Game Study Shows Sleep Apnea May Affect Memory

October 30, 2014 2:30 pm | News | Comments

Sleep apnea may affect your ability to form new spatial memories, such as remembering where you parked your car, new research suggests. The study demonstrates through the playing of a specific video game that disruption of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep as a consequence of sleep apnea impairs spatial memory.

Novel Ultrasound Technology Screens for Heart Conditions

October 30, 2014 1:41 pm | News | Comments

Engineers have determined for the first time the impact of a ring-shaped vortex on transporting blood flow in normal and abnormal ventricles within the human heart. In order to make the study possible, researchers have developed a novel ultrasound technology that makes screening cheaper and much easier.

First Human Stomach Tissues Generated in Lab

October 30, 2014 12:24 pm | Videos | Comments

Scientists used pluripotent stem cells to generate functional, three-dimensional human stomach tissue in a laboratory– creating a new tool for researching the development and diseases of an organ central to several public health crises.    

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Dozens of New Autism Genes Identified

October 30, 2014 11:10 am | News | Comments

Two major genetic studies of autism have newly implicated dozens of genes in the disorder. The research shows that rare mutations in these genes affect communication networks in the brain and compromise fundamental biological mechanisms.    

Young People More Likely to Survive Ebola

October 30, 2014 11:01 am | by Marilynn Marchione – AP Chief Medical Writer – Associated Press | News | Comments

Who survives Ebola and why? Health workers treating patients in Sierra Leone, including some who died doing that work, have published the most detailed report yet on medical aspects of the epidemic. The research suggests young people are less likely to perish.

Wisconsin Studies Music and Memory Program

October 30, 2014 10:56 am | by Carrie Antlfinger - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

Mike Knutson taught himself to play the harmonica as a child, and the 96-year-old sang with his family for most of his life. Even now, as he suffers from dementia, music is an important part of his life— thanks to a study looking at the impact of a nationwide music program aimed at helping dementia patients.

World-First Embryonic Stem Cell Trial for the Heart

October 30, 2014 9:37 am | by Cynthia Fox, Science Writer | Articles | Comments

The first embryonic stem (ES) cell trial for severe heart failure is launching now in Paris. The long-awaited trial comes after much preclinical cell work on more than 350 rats, 50 immunodeficient mice and 32 non-human primates.       

Genetic Link to Kidney Stones Identified

October 29, 2014 1:14 pm | News | Comments

A new breakthrough could help kidney stone sufferers get an exact diagnosis and specific treatment after genetic links to the condition were identified.                             

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The Skin Cancer Selfie

October 29, 2014 1:02 pm | Videos | Comments

If melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer, is caught early enough it is almost always curable. Now, a camera capable of taking snapshots of the entire human body and rendering high-resolution images of a patient’s skin may help doctors spot cancer early and save lives.

Investigating the Remarkable Memory of 'SuperAgers'

October 29, 2014 11:30 am | News | Comments

In 2012, scientists captured national attention by identifying for the first time a group of people over 80 with remarkable, age-defying memory power. Now, the same scientists will continue studying these “SuperAgers” to find out how they resist cognitive decline.  

Researchers Sequence Enterovirus D68 Genome

October 29, 2014 11:24 am | News | Comments

Researchers have sequenced the genome of enterovirus D68 sampled from patients treated at St. Louis Children’s Hospital. Nationwide, the virus has spread rapidly in recent months.                     

Blood Test Could Diagnose Early-onset Alzheimer’s

October 29, 2014 10:58 am | News | Comments

A non-invasive blood test that could diagnose early-onset Alzheimer’s disease (AD) with increased accuracy has been developed by researchers. The new early-detection blood test could predict these changes and a person’s risk of developing AD much earlier than is currently possible.

Google Developing Pill to Detect Cancer

October 29, 2014 10:45 am | by Brandon Bailey - AP Technology Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

Google is working on a cancer-detecting pill in its latest effort to push the boundaries of technology. Still in the experimental stage, the pill is packed with tiny magnetic particles, which can travel through a patient's bloodstream, search for malignant cells and report their findings to a sensor on a wearable device.

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Ebola’s Patient Zero Was Guinean Toddler

October 28, 2014 4:27 pm | by Maria Cheng - AP Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

In the Guinean village where the current West African Ebola outbreak began, 14 graves mark the spot where the lethal virus began to spiral out of control.                           

Biosensor Technology Could Allow Rapid Ebola Detection

October 28, 2014 2:18 pm | News | Comments

In 2010, a study reported the rapid detection of Ebola virus using new biosensor technology. There was little interest in developing the technology at the time, but now, in the wake of an Ebola outbreak, the researcher plans to resume his work on virus detection.

Vitamin D Deficiency Ups Attack Risk in Asthmatics

October 28, 2014 2:03 pm | News | Comments

A new study points to a convenient, free way to manage acute asthmatic episodes— catching some rays outside. The research showed that asthmatics with vitamin D deficiency were 25 percent more likely to experience acute attacks.       

Algae Virus Found in Healthy Human Throats

October 28, 2014 1:51 pm | News | Comments

Scientists have discovered an algae virus never before seen in the throats of healthy people that may subtly alter a range of cognitive functions including visual processing and spatial orientation in those who harbor it.         

Nurse Free of Ebola, Released from Hospital

October 28, 2014 1:26 pm | by Ray Henry - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

Amber Vinson, a nurse who fueled Ebola fears by flying to Cleveland after being infected by her dying patient in Dallas, is now virus-free, and was celebrated Tuesday by her caregivers as courageous and passionate before getting out of the hospital.

Patient-relevant Preclinical Models Using Image-guided Small Animal Irradiation

October 28, 2014 11:33 am | by Dr. Rajendra Kumari, Chief Scientific Officer, PRECOS Ltd., a Crown Bioscience Company | Articles | Comments

Radiotherapy is a primary, adjuvant or neoadjuvant treatment for a number of different cancers, such as glioblastoma, breast, lung and prostate. Image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) is used to reduce the amount of radiation delivered to the normal tissue surrounding the targeted tumor. However, in the preclinical setting, the use of IGRT is less common.

Heart Drug Helps Treat ALS in Mice

October 27, 2014 2:31 pm | News | Comments

Digoxin, a medication used in the treatment of heart failure, may be adaptable for the treatment of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a progressive, paralyzing disease, suggests new research.                  

Dietary Flavanols Reverse Age-related Memory Decline

October 27, 2014 2:26 pm | Videos | Comments

Dietary cocoa flavanols—naturally occurring bioactives found in cocoa—reversed age-related memory decline in healthy older adults, according to a new study.                           

Lipids, Not Calories, Trigger a Strong Insulin Response

October 27, 2014 2:16 pm | News | Comments

Researchers studying lipoproteins in Drosophila melanogaster found that that the blood-brain barrier is a main sensor to report the nutritional status, especially the lipid composition of consumed food, to special neurons that regulate insulin release.

Researchers Observe Brain Development in Utero

October 27, 2014 2:03 pm | Videos | Comments

New investigation methods using functional magnetic resonance tomography (fMRT) offer insights into fetal brain development. These in vivo observations will uncover different stages of the brain's development.              

Medical Pot Dilemma: Where to Get the First Seeds?

October 27, 2014 8:25 am | by Carla K. Johnson - AP Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

As more states legalize medical marijuana, there's one stage in the process nobody wants to talk about: the part where people still have to break the law.                            

Governors Stress Home Quarantine for Ebola Workers

October 27, 2014 3:26 am | by Frank Eltman - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

A nurse who protested being kept in a tent in New Jersey over the weekend despite lacking symptoms after caring for Ebola patients in West Africa was to be released Monday as scientists and federal officials clashed with state officials over quarantine policies.

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