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Aggressive Form of HIV Uncovered in Cuba

February 12, 2015 2:42 pm | by University of Leuven | News | Comments

Engaging in unprotected sex with multiple partners increases the risk of contracting multiple strains of HIV, the virus that causes AIDS. Once inside a host, these strains can recombine into a new variant of the virus.       

Apes Prefer the Glass Half Full

February 12, 2015 2:27 pm | by Duke University | News | Comments

Humans aren’t the only species to be influenced by spin. Our closest primate relatives are susceptible, too.                         

Oil Drilling Banned in Artic Area That Attracts Walrus

February 12, 2015 2:12 pm | by Dan Joling, Associated Press | News | Comments

A plateau on the Arctic Ocean floor, where thousands of Pacific walrus gather to feed and raise pups, has received new protections from the Obama administration that recognize it as a biological hot spot and mark it off-limits to future oil drilling.  

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Sequence of Genetic Mutations Determines How Cancer Behaves

February 12, 2015 10:15 am | News | Comments

Most of the genetic mutations that cause cancer result from environmental ‘damage’ (for example, through smoking or as a result of over-exposure to sunlight) or from spontaneous errors as cells divide. 

HPV Vaccination Not Linked to Riskier Sex

February 12, 2015 10:08 am | News | Comments

Receiving the human papillomavirus vaccine does not increase rates of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) in adolescent females. The vaccine, which can prevent cervical cancer in women, has had a low uptake, partly because of concerns about how it will affect adolescent sexual activity.

Smartphone Apps Just as Accurate as Wearable Devices: Study

February 12, 2015 10:04 am | News | Comments

Although wearable devices have received significant attention for their ability to track an individual’s physical activity, most smartphone applications are just as accurate, according to a new research letter in JAMA.              

Brain Stents Show Big Promise for Certain Stroke Patients

February 12, 2015 9:53 am | by Associated Press | News | Comments

Stroke experts are reporting a major advance: Stents similar to the ones used to open clogged heart arteries also can be used to clear a blood clot in the brain, greatly lowering the risk a patient will end up disabled.

Survival for Some Endangered Species Hinges on 'Frozen Zoo'

February 12, 2015 9:47 am | by Associated Press | News | Comments

Whenever an endangered animal dies at the San Diego Zoo, researchers race out, regardless of the hour, to remove its sperm or eggs, maybe a bit of ear or eyeball, and carefully freeze the cells in liquid nitrogen.

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Isolated Systolic Hypertension Indicates Heart Disease Risk for Younger Adults

February 12, 2015 9:32 am | News | Comments

High systolic blood pressure – the top number in a blood pressure reading – has long been considered an indicator of cardiovascular disease risk for adults over 50. But now a new Northwestern Medicine study suggests that it’s also important for younger adults.

Common Biomarkers of Sleep Debt Found in Humans, Rats: Study

February 12, 2015 9:10 am | News | Comments

Stating that sleep is an essential biological process seems as obvious as saying that the sun rises every morning. Yet, researchers' understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of sleep loss is still in its earliest stages.

Grey Matter Loss from Smoking May be Reversible: Study

February 10, 2015 5:12 pm | News | Comments

Damage to the brain's outer layer caused by smoking may be reversible after quitting, but it could take years, a study said. Brain scans of 500 Scottish septuagenarians confirmed a link between smoking and an acceleration of age-related thinning of the cortex—the outer layer of grey matter, researchers reported.

Plant Extract Fights Brain Tumor

February 10, 2015 5:06 pm | by Max Planck Society | News | Comments

Silibinin has an outstanding safety profile in humans and is currently used for the treatment of liver disease and poisoning.                                                     

Babies Identify Complex Social Situations

February 10, 2015 5:02 pm | by University of Missouri-Columbia | News | Comments

In the social world, people constantly gather information through visual cues that are used to evaluate others and interact. A new study from researchers at the University of Missouri determined that babies can make sense of complex social situations, and that they expect people to behave appropriately.     

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Screening Tool Could Speed Ovarian Cancer Drug Development

February 10, 2015 4:56 pm | by University of Chicago | News | Comments

University of Chicago Medicine researchers have built a model system that uses multiple cell types from patients to rapidly test compounds that could block the early steps in ovarian cancer metastasis. Their three-dimensional cell-culture system, adapted for high-throughput screening, has enabled them to identify small molecules that can inhibit adhesion and invasion, preventing ovarian cancers from spreading to nearby tissues.

New Cellular Pathway Defect in Cystinosis

February 10, 2015 4:41 pm | by Scripps Research Institute | News | Comments

Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have identified a new cellular pathway that is affected in cystinosis, a rare genetic disorder that can result in eye and kidney damage.                                 

90 Percent Approve of Cancer Screening But Uptake is Lower

February 10, 2015 4:35 pm | by Cancer Research UK | News | Comments

The researchers, from Cancer Research UK's Health Behaviour Research Centre at University College London (UCL), interviewed almost 1,900 people aged 50-80 years old about their views on cancer screening.                   

Coral Snake Venom Reveals Unique Route to Lethality

February 10, 2015 9:34 am | by Johns Hopkins University | News | Comments

A vial of rare snake venom refused to give up its secret formula for lethality; its toxins had no effect on the proteins that most venoms target.                   

Startup Uses Google Glass to Improve Patient-Physician Relationship

February 10, 2015 9:28 am | by Tracie White, Stanford Medical School | News | Comments

Firsthand experience working in hospitals and clinics helped inspire third-year Stanford medical student Pelu Tran to explore a potential career path in the world of high-tech startups.             

Persevering Past Roadblocks to Build Promising Ebola Vaccine

February 10, 2015 9:08 am | by Lauran Neergard - AP Medical Writer | News | Comments

Ebola has claimed nearly 9,000 lives in West Africa over the past year, although new infections have dropped dramatically in recent months.                    

Senate Approves Ex-Mass Official as U.S. Drug Czar

February 10, 2015 9:00 am | by Matthew Daly - Associated Press | News | Comments

President Barack Obama's nominee to serve as U.S. drug "czar" won unanimous approval in the Senate Monday as lawmakers vowed to curb an epidemic that results in more than 40,000 deaths a year from overdoses of prescription painkillers, heroin and other substances.

Impact of Obesity on Fertility Can be Reversed

February 10, 2015 8:56 am | by University of Adelaide | News | Comments

Researchers have revealed how damage from obesity is passed from a mother to her children, and also how that damage can be reversed.                      

Tests Show NFL Brain Damage May Linger, Start Young

February 9, 2015 2:42 pm | by Cynthia Fox, Science Writer | Articles | Comments

After the highly charged Super Bowl, two sobering studies emerged. One unveiled an improved molecular imaging technology that verified—and precisely identified—brain damage in some National Football League (NFL) players. The other study revealed that brain damage can be more severe in NFL players who start playing football before age 12.

Cow Immune System Inspires Potential New Therapies

February 6, 2015 12:19 pm | by The Scripps Research Institute | News | Comments

Scientists have developed a potential new therapy based on an unlikely model: immune molecules from cows.                          

Brazil Scientists Fear Golden Mussel Threat to Amazon River

February 6, 2015 12:14 pm | by Jenny Barchfield - Associated Press | News | Comments

The world's mightiest waterway, the Amazon River, is threatened by the most diminutive of foes - a tiny mussel invading from China.                      

Highlighting Brain Cells' Role in Navigating Environment

February 5, 2015 3:13 pm | by Dartmouth University | News | Comments

A new Dartmouth College study sheds light on the brain cells that function in establishing one's location and direction. The findings contribute to our understanding of the neural mechanisms underlying our abilities to successfully navigate our environment, which may be crucial to dealing with brain damage due to trauma or a stroke and the onset of diseases such as Alzheimer's.

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