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Solving a Sticky Problem with Fetal Surgery Using Glue Inspired by Sandcastle Worm

August 11, 2014 1:48 pm | News | Comments

In creating an adhesive patterned after glue produced by the lowly underwater sandcastle worm, researchers are reporting today that they may have solved the problem of premature births that sometimes result from fetal surgery. It also could open up numerous opportunities to safely perform more complex fetal surgeries in the future.

Making Cashews Safer for Those with Allergies

August 11, 2014 1:37 pm | News | Comments

For the millions of adults and children in the U.S. who have to shun nuts to avoid an allergic reaction, help could be on the way. Scientists are now developing a method to process cashews—and potentially other nuts—that could make them safer to eat for people who are allergic to them.

Can People with Type 2 Diabetes Live Longer?

August 8, 2014 1:26 pm | News | Comments

A large-scale University-led study involving more than 180,000 people shows that patients treated with a drug widely prescribed for type 2 diabetes can live longer than people without the condition. The findings indicate that a drug known as metformin, used to control glucose levels in the body and already known to exhibit anticancer properties, could offer prognostic and prophylactic benefits to people without diabetes.

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Wild Sheep Show Benefits of Putting Up with Parasites

August 8, 2014 12:47 pm | News | Comments

In the first evidence that natural selection favors an individual's infection tolerance, researchers from Princeton University and the University of Edinburgh have found that an animal's ability to endure an internal parasite strongly influences its reproductive success. The finding could provide the groundwork for boosting the resilience of humans and livestock to infection.

Boeing Partners with South African Airways to Turn New Tobacco Plant into Jet Fuel

August 8, 2014 12:25 pm | News | Comments

Boeing, South African Airways (SAA) and SkyNRG announced they are collaborating to make sustainable aviation biofuel from a new type of tobacco plant. This initiative broadens cooperation between Boeing and SAA to develop renewable jet fuel in ways that support South Africa's goals for public health as well as economic and rural development.

'Normal' Bacteria Vital for Keeping Intestinal Lining Intact

August 7, 2014 4:24 pm | by Einstein | News | Comments

Scientists at Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University have found that bacteria that aid in digestion help keep the intestinal lining intact. The findings could yield new therapies for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and a wide range of other disorders.

Bad Bite: A Tick Can Make You Allergic to Red Meat

August 7, 2014 1:27 pm | by Marilynn Marchione - AP Chief Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

A tick bite might make you a vegetarian, or at least make you swear off red meat. Doctors across the nation are seeing a surge of sudden meat allergies in people bitten by Lone Star ticks, which are found in the Southwest and eastern half of the U.S.

Nasal Test Accurately Diagnoses Human Prion Disease

August 7, 2014 9:57 am | News | Comments

A nasal brush test can rapidly and accurately diagnose Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD), an incurable and ultimately fatal neurodegenerative disorder, according to a new study.                     

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Low Vitamin D Ups Dementia Risk, Study Says

August 7, 2014 9:51 am | News | Comments

In the largest study of its kind, researchers suggests that in older people, not getting enough vitamin D may double the risk of developing dementia and Alzheimer’s disease.                      

FDA Warns of Infection-causing Tattoo Inks

August 7, 2014 3:23 am | by Mary Clare Jalonick - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

Thinking about getting inked? Check the bottle first. The Food and Drug Administration is warning tattoo parlors, their customers and those buying at-home tattoo kits that not all tattoo ink is safe.               

New Gene Tied to Breast Cancer Risk

August 6, 2014 5:23 pm | by Marilynn Marchione - AP Chief Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

It's long been known that faulty BRCA genes greatly raise the risk for breast cancer. Now, scientists say a more recently identified, less common gene - called PALB2 - can do the same.                 

Biology Made Simpler with "Clear" Tissues

August 6, 2014 1:22 pm | News | Comments

In general, our knowledge of biology—and much of science in general—is limited by our ability to actually see things. Researchers who study developmental problems and disease, in particular, are often limited by their inability to look inside an organism to figure out exactly what went wrong and when. Now, thanks to techniques developed at Caltech, scientists can see through tissues, organs, and even an entire body. 

Scientists Uncover New Clues to Repairing Injured Spinal Cord

August 6, 2014 1:19 pm | News | Comments

Frogs, dogs, whales, snails can all do it, but humans and primates can't. Regrow nerves after an injury, that is— while many animals have this ability, humans don't. But now, new research suggests that a small molecule may be able to convince damaged nerves to grow and effectively rewire circuits.

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Some Saturated Fatty Acids May Carry Bigger Risk Than Others

August 6, 2014 1:08 pm | News | Comments

The relationship between saturated fat and type 2 diabetes may be more complex than previously thought, according a study that claims saturated fatty acids can be associated with both an increased and decreased risk of developing the disease, depending on the type of fatty acids present in the blood.

Lasers, Nanotubes Help to Look Inside Living Brains

August 6, 2014 12:40 pm | News | Comments

A team of scientists has developed an entirely non-invasive technique that provides a view of blood flow in the brain. The tool could provide powerful insights into strokes and possibly Alzheimer's disease.             

Eating Baked or Broiled Fish Weekly Boosts Brain Health

August 5, 2014 2:43 pm | News | Comments

Eating baked or broiled fish once a week is good for the brain, regardless of how much omega-3 fatty acid it contains, according to researchers at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. The findings add to growing evidence that lifestyle factors contribute to brain health later in life.

Enhancing Biofuel Yields from Biomass with Novel New Method

August 5, 2014 2:15 pm | News | Comments

A team of researchers, led by Professor Charles E. Wyman, at the University of California, Riverside’s Bourns College of Engineering have developed a versatile, relatively non-toxic, and efficient way to convert raw agricultural and forestry residues and other plant matter, known as lignocellulosic biomass, into biofuels and chemicals.

Study Predicts Hepatitis C Will Become a Rare Disease in 22 Years

August 5, 2014 2:06 pm | News | Comments

Effective new drugs and screening would make hepatitis C a rare disease by 2036, according to a computer simulation conducted by The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center and the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health.

Obesity Paradox in Survival from Sepsis

August 5, 2014 1:51 pm | News | Comments

University of Michigan Health System researchers revealed an obesity paradox among older Americans suffering from sepsis. In a study of 1,404 Medicare beneficiaries, heavier patients were more likely to survive the life-threatening infection that can lead to a stay in a hospital’s intensive care unit.

Clues to the Aging of Tendons Unlocked

August 5, 2014 1:33 pm | News | Comments

University of Liverpool scientists have examined the mechanisms that cause ageing in the tendons of horses, opening up the possibility of better treatment for humans. It has been understood for many years that tendons are highly prone to injury and that this likelihood increases as they age.  Why this happens, is currently poorly understood.

DNA Modifications Predict Brain’s Threat Response

August 4, 2014 1:01 pm | News | Comments

The tiny addition of a chemical mark atop a gene that is well known for its involvement in clinical depression and posttraumatic stress disorder can affect the way a person’s brain responds to threats, according to a new study.       

Chili Pepper Chemical May Inhibit Gut Tumors

August 4, 2014 12:35 pm | News | Comments

Researchers report that dietary capsaicin– the active ingredient in chili peppers– produces chronic activation of a receptor on cells lining the intestines of mice, triggering a reaction that ultimately reduces the risk of colorectal tumors.   

Small RNAs in Blood May Reveal Heart Injury

August 4, 2014 12:07 pm | News | Comments

New research suggests that microRNAs may be able to relay valuable information about damage to the heart: Scientists have linked an increase in certain microRNAs circulating in the blood with injury to cardiac muscle.          

Did Lower Testosterone Help Civilize Humanity?

August 4, 2014 11:46 am | News | Comments

A study of 1,400 ancient and modern human skulls suggests that a reduction in testosterone hormone levels accompanied the development of cooperation, complex communication and modern culture some 50,000 years ago.           

African Plant May Be Possible Treatment for Aging Brain

August 4, 2014 11:22 am | News | Comments

Scientists have discovered that a compound isolated from the plant protects cells from altered molecular pathways linked to Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and the neurodegeneration that often follows a stroke.              

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