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Scientists One Step Closer to Stem Cell Therapy for MS

July 25, 2014 1:29 pm | News | Comments

Scientists at The New York Stem Cell Foundation (NYSCF) Research Institute are one step closer to creating a viable cell replacement therapy for multiple sclerosis from a patient's own cells.                  

Key Muscle Component's Atomic Structure Revealed

July 25, 2014 12:54 pm | News | Comments

In a new study, biophysicists describe– in minute detail- how actin filaments are stabilized at one of their ends to form a basic muscle structure called the sarcomere.                        

Monitoring the Rise and Fall of the Microbiome

July 25, 2014 12:23 pm | News | Comments

Trillions of bacteria live in each person’s digestive tract, but their role in human health is not well understood. To help shed light on the role of these bacteria, a team of researchers recently tracked fluctuations in the bacterial populations of two research subjects over a full year.

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Rosemary and Oregano Contain Diabetes-fighting Compounds

July 24, 2014 1:56 pm | News | Comments

The popular culinary herbs oregano and rosemary are packed with healthful compounds, and now lab tests show they could work in much the same way as prescription anti-diabetic medication, scientists report. In their new study, they found that how the herbs are grown makes a difference, and they also identified which compounds contribute the most to this promising trait.

Background TV Can be Bad for Kids

July 24, 2014 1:24 pm | Videos | Comments

Parents, turn off the television when your children are with you. And when you do let them watch, make sure the programs stimulate their interest in learning. At least, that's the advice arising from researchers who examined the impact of television and parenting on children’s social and emotional development.

Researchers Show How Stress Hormones Promote Building of Negative Memories

July 24, 2014 1:16 pm | News | Comments

When a person experiences a devastating loss or tragic event, why does every detail seem burned into memory whereas a host of positive experiences simply fade away? It’s a bit more complicated than scientists originally thought, according to a study.

China Lifts Quarantine in Plague City

July 24, 2014 1:20 am | News | Comments

A nine-day quarantine imposed on parts of a northern Chinese city where a man there died of bubonic plague has been lifted, China's official news agency reported Thursday.                       

Try, Try Again? Study Says No

July 23, 2014 11:00 am | News | Comments

In a new study, a team of researchers has found evidence for a factor that contributes to adults’ language difficulties: When learning certain elements of language, adults’ more highly developed cognitive skills actually get in the way.     

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Human Platelets Generated in Bioreactor

July 23, 2014 10:47 am | News | Comments

Scientists have developed a scalable, next-generation platelet bioreactor to generate fully functional human platelets in vitro. The work might help address blood transfusion needs worldwide.                  

Researchers ID Mechanism to Clear Diabetes-related Pancreatic Protein

July 23, 2014 10:43 am | News | Comments

People with Type 2 diabetes have an excess of a protein called islet amyloid polypeptide, or IAPP, and the accumulation of this protein is linked to the loss of insulin-producing pancreatic beta cells. Now, a team of researchers may have found a solution in autophagy, a process that clears damaged and toxic proteins from cell.

Mapping Finds New Schizophrenia-linked Genes

July 23, 2014 8:30 am | by Seth Borenstein - AP Science Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

Scientists have linked more than 100 spots in our DNA to the risk of developing schizophrenia, casting light on the mystery of what makes the disease tick. Such work could eventually point to new treatments, although they are many years away.   

Eating Probiotics Regularly May Improve Your Blood Pressure

July 22, 2014 1:36 pm | News | Comments

Eating probiotics regularly may modestly improve your blood pressure, according to new research. Probiotics are live microorganisms (naturally occurring bacteria in the gut) thought to have beneficial effects; common sources are yogurt or dietary supplements.

Breaking News: Lack of Vitamin D Ups Schizophrenia Risk

July 22, 2014 1:17 pm | News | Comments

Vitamin D-deficient individuals are twice as likely to be diagnosed with schizophrenia as people who have sufficient levels of the vitamin, according to a new study.                        

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Metabolic Enzyme Stops Progression of Kidney Cancer

July 21, 2014 1:52 pm | News | Comments

In an analysis of metabolites used by the body to make fuel in normal and cancerous cells in human kidney tissue, a research team identified an enzyme that is key to applying the brakes on tumor growth.              

New Trigger for Ovulation Could Make IVF Safer

July 21, 2014 12:34 pm | Videos | Comments

Researchers have successfully used a new and potentially safer method to stimulate ovulation in women undergoing IVF treatment. Twelve babies have been born after their mothers were given an injection of the natural hormone kisspeptin to make their eggs mature.

Common Gene Variants Account for Most Genetic Risk for Autism

July 21, 2014 11:26 am | News | Comments

Most of the genetic risk for autism comes from versions of genes that are common in the population rather than from rare variants or spontaneous glitches, researchers have found. Heritability also outweighed other risk factors in this largest study of its kind to date.

New Findings Show Early Seeding of HIV Viral Reservoir

July 21, 2014 11:13 am | News | Comments

A research team has demonstrated that the viral reservoir of HIV-1 infection is established strikingly early after intrarectal simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection of rhesus monkeys and before detectable viremia.         

Scientists Find New Clues to Brain’s Wiring

July 18, 2014 2:14 pm | News | Comments

New research provides an intriguing glimpse into the processes that establish connections between nerve cells in the brain. These synapses allow nerve cells to transmit and process information involved in thinking and moving the body.     

Managing Ecosystems via Genomics

July 18, 2014 2:11 pm | News | Comments

A cross-disciplinary team is calling for public discussion about a potential new way to solve longstanding global ecological problems by using an emerging technology called “gene drives.” The advance could potentially lead to powerful new ways of combating malaria and other insect-borne diseases.

Gene Variation May Modify Cardiovascular Benefit of Aspirin

July 18, 2014 1:01 pm | News | Comments

A daily low-dose aspirin is widely prescribed for the prevention of cardiovascular disease. Now, a new study suggests that common genetic variation may modify the cardiovascular benefit of aspirin.                

Researchers Uncover New Cancer Cell Vulnerability

July 18, 2014 12:52 pm | News | Comments

Researchers have uncovered a genetic vulnerability of cancer cells that express telomerase— an enzyme that drives their unchecked growth— and showed that telomerase-expressing cells depend upon a gene named p21 for their survival.      

One Injection Stops Diabetes in Its Tracks

July 17, 2014 11:03 am | Videos | Comments

In mice with diet-induced diabetes, the equivalent of type 2 diabetes in humans, a single injection of the protein FGF1 is enough to restore blood sugar levels to a healthy range for more than two days, according to a new study.       

How Cannabis Causes Paranoia

July 17, 2014 10:45 am | News | Comments

The largest study of the effects of the main ingredient of cannabis has shown definitively that it can cause short-term paranoia. The research also, for the first time, identifies psychological factors that can lead to feelings of paranoia in people who take cannabis.

Scientists Find Way to Trap, Kill Malaria Parasite

July 17, 2014 10:20 am | News | Comments

Scientists may be able to entomb the malaria parasite in a prison of its own making, researchers at are reporting. The malaria parasite is among the world’s deadliest pathogens.                     

Bubble Wrap Serves as Sheet of Tiny Test Tubes in Resource-limited Regions

July 16, 2014 2:21 pm | News | Comments

Popping the blisters on the bubble wrap might be the most enjoyable thing about moving. But now, scientists propose a more productive way to reuse the popular packing material—as a sheet of small, test tube-like containers for medical and environmental samples.

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