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New ALS-associated Gene Identified

October 23, 2014 12:33 pm | News | Comments

Using an innovative exome sequencing strategy, a team of international scientists has shown that TUBA4A, the gene encoding the Tubulin Alpha 4A protein, is associated with familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS).         

Environment Could Improve Stem Cell Therapies

October 23, 2014 12:27 pm | News | Comments

Stem cell therapies are being hailed as a potential cure for many major health conditions, but there is much still to learn about the highly complex environments needed to optimize these therapies, according to new research.       

Study Clarifies How Body Defends Against Harmful Bacteria

October 23, 2014 12:14 pm | News | Comments

Researchers have identified an unusual process by which the body can sense the presence of pathogenic bacteria and destroy them. Rather than detect the microbes directly, individual cells monitor how the bacteria interfere with the functioning of energy-producing cellular structures called mitochondria.

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Fast Modeling of Cancer Mutations

October 23, 2014 12:06 pm | News | Comments

Researchers now developed a new way to model the effects of these genetic mutations in mice. The approach, based on the genome-editing technique known as CRISPR, is much faster than existing strategies, which require genetically engineering mice that carry the cancerous mutations.

Real-time System Monitors Dangerous Bacteria in the Body

October 23, 2014 11:56 am | News | Comments

Combining a PET scanner with a new chemical tracer that selectively tags specific types of bacteria, researchers working with mice report they have devised a way to detect and monitor in real time infections with a class of dangerous Gram-negative bacteria.

U.S. to Track Everyone Coming from Ebola Nations

October 23, 2014 8:30 am | by Mike Stobbe - AP Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

All travelers who come into the U.S. from three Ebola-stricken West African nations will now be monitored for three weeks, the latest step by federal officials to keep the disease from spreading into the country.            

Tackling Blindness, Deafness Through Neuroengineering

October 22, 2014 2:26 pm | News | Comments

The Bertarelli Program in Translational Neuroscience and Neuroengineering, a collaborative program between Harvard Medical School and the École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL) in Switzerland, has announced a new set of grants worth $3.6 million for five research projects.

Childhood Autism Linked to Air Toxics

October 22, 2014 2:13 pm | News | Comments

Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) were more likely to have been exposed to higher levels of certain air toxics during their mothers’ pregnancies and the first two years of life compared to children without the condition, according to a new study.

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Olive Oil More Stable, Healthful for Frying Food

October 22, 2014 1:52 pm | News | Comments

Before dunking your favorite food in a vat of just any old oil, consider using olive. Scientists are reporting that olive oil withstands the heat of the fryer or pan better than several seed oils to yield more healthful food.       

Skin Patch May Replace Syringe for Disease Diagnosis

October 22, 2014 1:46 pm | News | Comments

Drawing blood and testing it is standard practice for many medical diagnostics. As a less painful alternative, scientists are developing skin patches that could one day replace the syringe.                  

Hidden Subpopulation of Melanoma Cells Discovered

October 22, 2014 1:40 pm | News | Comments

Researchers have pinpointed a set of intriguing characteristics in a previously unknown subpopulation of melanoma cancer cells in blood vessels of tumors.                           

Imaging and Analysis with Flying Colors: Part One

October 22, 2014 8:30 am | by Mark Clymer, Director of Marketing, Datacolor Inc. | Articles | Comments

Researchers are facing increasing demands from colleagues, peers and publishers for process documentation including adequate controls, and for extensive documentation of experimental parameters. Without such consideration, there would be little chance to repeat, or even validate, findings.

Red Cross Official: 6 Months to Contain Ebola

October 22, 2014 3:26 am | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

A top Red Cross official says he is confident the Ebola epidemic can be contained within four to six months. The Ebola outbreak has killed more than 4,500 people since it emerged 10 months ago, with Liberia, Guinea and Sierra Leone the worst-affected countries.

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Cancer Drug Resistance Has an ‘Off Switch’

October 21, 2014 11:29 am | Videos | Comments

Scientists have uncovered details about how cancer is able to become drug resistant over time, a phenomenon that occurs because cancer cells within the same tumor aren’t identical.                     

See-through Sensors Open New Window into the Brain

October 21, 2014 11:18 am | News | Comments

Developing invisible implantable medical sensor arrays, a team of engineers has overcome a major technological hurdle in researchers’ efforts to understand the brain.                         

Tarantula Venom Illuminates Electrical Activity in Live Cells

October 21, 2014 11:01 am | Videos | Comments

Researchers have created a cellular probe that combines a tarantula toxin with a fluorescent compound to help scientists observe electrical activity in neurons and other cells.                     

Oscillating Mitochondria Imaged in Live Animal

October 21, 2014 10:52 am | News | Comments

Mitochondrial oscillations have quietly bewildered scientists for more than 40 years. Now, a team of scientists has imaged mitochondria for the first time oscillating in a live animal, in this case, the salivary glands of laboratory rats.    

B Vitamins Can Help Beat Depression

October 21, 2014 10:39 am | News | Comments

Supplementing current anti-depressant medication with B vitamins improves response to treatment, according to a new study.                                     

Why Ebola Kills Some People, Others Survive

October 21, 2014 10:29 am | by Lauran Neergaard - AP Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

People who shared an apartment with the country's first Ebola patient are emerging from quarantine healthy. And while Thomas Eric Duncan died and two U.S. nurses were infected caring for him, there are successes, too: A nurse infected in Spain has recovered, as have four American aid workers infected in West Africa. Even there, not everyone dies.

CDC Releases Revised Ebola Gear Guidelines

October 21, 2014 8:26 am | by Mike Stobbe - AP Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

Health officials have released new guidelines for how health workers should gear up to treat Ebola patients. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released the long-anticipated updates on Monday evening.           

Nigeria Declared Ebola-free; 'Spectacular Success'

October 20, 2014 3:26 pm | by Michelle Faul - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

Water laced with salt and sugar, and gallons of the nasty-tasting stuff. Doctors who survived Ebola in Nigeria credited heavy doses of fluids with saving their lives as the Who declared the country Ebola-free Monday.          

Fairness is in the Brain

October 20, 2014 12:18 pm | News | Comments

Ever wondered how people figure out what is fair? Look to the brain for the answer. According to a new study, people appreciate fairness in much the same way as they appreciate money for themselves, and also that fairness is not necessarily that everybody gets the same income.

Magnesium in Diet Cuts Diabetes Risk

October 20, 2014 11:49 am | News | Comments

Getting enough magnesium in the diet may reduce the risk of diabetes, especially for those who already show signs of heading that way, according to a new study.                         

Scientific Evidence Does Not Support 'Brain Game' Claims

October 20, 2014 11:39 am | News | Comments

A group of scholars issued a statement skeptical about the effectiveness of so-called "brain game" products, citing that the scientific track record does not support the claims that these games actually help older adults boost their mental powers.

Experimental Drug Restores Pleasure-seeking Behavior in Bipolar Patients

October 20, 2014 11:05 am | News | Comments

A drug being studied as a fast-acting mood-lifter restored pleasure-seeking behavior independent of— and ahead of— its other antidepressant effects, in an NIH trial.                         

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