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New Strategy Pinpoints Single Protein to Reduce Allergic Responses to Multiple Meds

February 3, 2015 1:42 pm | by University of Alberta | News | Comments

Every day in hospitals around the world, patients suffer painful allergic reactions to the medicines they are given. The reactions, known as pseudo-allergies, often cause patients to endure itchiness, swelling and rashes as an unwanted part of their treatment plan. The reactions can be so severe they may stop patients from taking their needed medications and sometimes can even prove fatal. 

Two Genetic Mutations May Interact to Lower Heart Attack Risk

February 3, 2015 1:24 pm | by Ohio State Univ. | News | Comments

Researchers have determined that two mutations on a single gene can interact in a way that lowers the carrier's risk for a heart attack.  The variants are found in a gene called DBH, which regulates an enzyme involved in the conversion of dopamine to norepinephrine - both of which are important chemical messengers and hormones.

Uncovering Genetic Trigger for Immune Response

February 3, 2015 1:06 pm | by Yale University | News | Comments

The thousands of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) molecules present in each cell are known primarily for their role converting food and oxygen into energy. But Yale researchers have identified an unexpected relationship between mtDNA and the innate immune response.

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Protective Brain Protein Reveals Gender Implications for Autism, Alzheimer's Research

February 3, 2015 12:56 pm | by Tel Aviv University | News | Comments

A new study by Tel Aviv University's Prof. Illana Gozes, published in Translational Psychiatry, may offer insight into the pathology of both autism and Alzheimer's by revealing that different activities of certain proteins in males and females cause gender-specific tendencies toward these diseases.    

UK House of Commons OKs Making Babies From DNA of 3 People

February 3, 2015 12:29 pm | by Maria Cheng, AP Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

Britain's House of Commons gave preliminary approval to permitting scientists to create babies from the DNA of three people, a technique that could protect some children from inheriting potentially fatal diseases from their mothers. Read more...

New 'Reset' Button Discovered for Circadian Clock

February 2, 2015 3:01 pm | by David Salisbury - Vanderbilt University | News | Comments

The discovery of a new reset button for the brain’s master biological clock could eventually lead to new treatments for conditions like seasonal affective disorder, reduce the adverse health effects of working the night shift and possibly even treat jet lag. 

Illusion Aids Understanding of Autism

February 2, 2015 2:48 pm | by Monash University | News | Comments

New research could lead to a better understanding of how the brain works in people with autism.                                               

Face Blindness Predicted by Structural Differences in Brain

February 2, 2015 2:35 pm | by Leslie Willoughby - Stanford University | News | Comments

Recognizing the faces of family and friends seems vital to social interaction.                                                   

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Study: Toddler Food Often Has Too Much Salt, Sugar

February 2, 2015 2:23 pm | by Lindsey Tanner - AP Medical Writer | News | Comments

Many packaged meals and snacks for toddlers contain worrisome amounts of salt and sugar, potentially creating an early taste for foods that may contribute to obesity and other health risks.                     

President Obama Reveals Details About Precision Medicine Project

February 1, 2015 6:45 pm | by Ryan Bushey, Associate Editor | Videos | Comments

President Obama held a press conference revealing new details surrounding the Precision Medicine initiative he announced during the State of The Union.                               

Inside Google's Secretive Life Sciences Lab

January 29, 2015 4:11 pm | by Ryan Bushey, Associate Editor | Videos | Comments

This is the first official look at the life sciences division of Google X.                               

Variety Show

January 29, 2015 3:15 pm | by Stephanie Dutchen, Harvard Medical School | News | Comments

Researchers have begun to appreciate the importance of copy number variation when considering the connections between DNA and disease.                     

Study Shows Menopause Does Not Increase or Create Difficulty Sleeping

January 29, 2015 3:05 pm | by University of Pennsylvania | News | Comments

Women in their late thirties and forties who have trouble sleeping are more than three times more likely to suffer sleep problems during menopause than women who have an easier time getting shut-eye.          

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Novel Eye-Tracking Technology Detects Concussions and Head Injury Severity

January 29, 2015 2:49 pm | by NYU Langone | News | Comments

This research could move the medical community one step closer toward effectively detecting concussion and quantifying its severity.                      

Arizona Monitoring Hundreds for Measles Linked to Disneyland

January 29, 2015 2:27 pm | by Felicia Fonseca - Associated Press | News | Comments

A measles outbreak in Arizona that originated at California's Disney parks is at risk of increasing dramatically in size as health officials keep tabs on 1,000 people, including nearly 200 children who could have been exposed at a Phoenix-area medical center.

WHO: Ebola Response Shifts to Ending Epidemic

January 29, 2015 2:23 pm | by Maria Cheng - AP Medical Writer | News | Comments

The U.N. health agency said the three most affected countries - Guinea, Sierra Leone and Liberia - have reported fewer than 100 cases in the past week, for the first time since June.             

Exploring Upper Motor Neuron Degeneration in ALS

January 28, 2015 3:00 pm | by Nora Dunne, Northwestern University | News | Comments

For the first time, scientists have revealed a mechanism underlying the cellular degeneration of upper motor neurons, a small group of neurons in the brain recently shown to play a major role in ALS pathology.         

Ancient Israeli Skull May Document Migration from Africa

January 28, 2015 2:37 pm | by Malcolm Ritter - AP Science Writer | News | Comments

The skull dates from around 55,000 years ago, fitting into the period when scientists had thought the migrants inhabited the area.                      

Diets, Nutrition Essential for Mental Health

January 28, 2015 10:59 am | by University of Melbourne | News | Comments

Evidence is rapidly growing showing vital relationships between both diet quality and potential nutritional deficiencies and mental health, a new international collaboration led by the University of Melbourne and Deakin University has revealed.               

Diabetes in Rats Treated with Engineered Probiotic

January 28, 2015 10:53 am | by Cornell University | News | Comments

Cornell researchers have achieved this feat in rats by engineering human lactobacilli, a common gut bacteria, to secrete a protein called Glucagen-like peptide 1 (GLP-1).                    

The Winners, Losers of Ocean Acidification

January 28, 2015 10:30 am | by University of Cambridge | News | Comments

Populations of certain types of marine organisms known collectively as the ‘biofouling community’ – tiny creatures that attach themselves to ships’ hulls and rocks – may quadruple within decades, while others may see their numbers reduced by as much as 80 percent, if the world’s oceans continue to become more acidic, according to new research.

Nanoparticle that Lights Up Artery-Clogging Plaque to be Evaluated

January 28, 2015 10:07 am | by Washington University in St. Louis | News | Comments

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved for evaluating in people a nanoparticle-based imaging agent jointly developed at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and the University of California, Santa Barbara, in collaboration with Texas A&M University.

Biology, Driven by Data

January 28, 2015 10:00 am | by MIT | News | Comments

Cells are incredibly complicated machines with thousands of interacting parts — and disruptions to any of those interactions can cause disease.                                     

By Taking a Rest, Exhausted T Cells Live to Fight Another Day

January 26, 2015 9:56 am | by Howard Hughes Medical Institute | News | Comments

Killer T cells are one of the body's main lines of defense against pathogens.                               

Zombie Bacteria in Tuberculosis

January 26, 2015 9:50 am | by Ecole Polytechnique Federale De Lausanne | News | Comments

Tuberculosis affects over 12 million people globally, and is usually treated with a course of four drugs over several months.                       

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