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How Right Hemisphere Assists Left When Damaged in Stroke

February 18, 2015 12:46 pm | by George Washington Univ. | News | Comments

A new study conducted by a researcher at the George Washington University suggests that the right hemisphere of the brain may be able to assist a damaged left hemisphere in protecting visual attention after a stroke.

Plants Survive Mass Extinctions Better Than Animals

February 18, 2015 12:33 pm | by University of Gothenburg | News | Comments

At least 5 mass extinction events have profoundly changed the history of life on Earth. But a new study led by researchers at the University of Gothenburg shows that plants have been very resilient to those events.  

Amyloid Formation May Link Alzheimer's, Type 2 Diabetes

February 18, 2015 12:28 pm | by Elsevier Health Sciences | News | Comments

The pathological process amyloidosis, in which misfolded proteins (amyloids) form insoluble fibril deposits, occurs in many diseases, including Alzheimer disease (AD) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D). 

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Tadpole Model Links Drug Exposure to Autism-Like Effects

February 18, 2015 11:51 am | News | Comments

Research suggests that fetal exposure to chemicals or drugs can cause neurological problems. Babies whose mothers take the epilepsy drug valporic acid (VPA) during pregnancy, for example, appear to have an elevated risk of developing an autism spectrum disorder.

Is Strenuous Running Really as Bad for Health as Lounging?

February 18, 2015 11:32 am | by Cynthia Fox, Science Writer | News | Comments

Running hard may be as bad for your longevity as being a couch potato, says a recent study—one that should be taken with a grain of salt (hold the butter), say some critics. The study, in a recent Journal of the American College of Cardiology, examined 5,048 healthy people enrolled in the Copenhagen City Heart Study. For 12 years, 1,098 healthy joggers and 413 healthy, but sedentary non-joggers were followed.

Broca's Area is the Brain's Scriptwriter, Shaping Speech

February 17, 2015 4:27 pm | by Johns Hopkins University | News | Comments

This new insight about Broca’s area, which is located in the frontal cortex above and behind the left eye, could ultimately benefit the treatment of language impairments due to stroke, epilepsy and brain injuries.        

Anti-Inflammatory Mechanism of Dieting, Fasting Revealed

February 17, 2015 4:22 pm | by Karen N. Peart, Yale News | News | Comments

Researchers have found that a compound produced by the body when dieting or fasting can block a part of the immune system involved in several inflammatory disorders such as type 2 diabetes, atherosclerosis, and Alzheimer’s disease.     

Iron May be a Factor in Dementia

February 17, 2015 4:09 pm | by Leigh Dayton, UTS | News | Comments

There is no way to spot Alzheimer's early, no effective treatment and no known cure.                             

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Tiny Oregon Minnow is First Fish Taken Off Endangered List

February 17, 2015 3:51 pm | by Jeff Barnard, Associated Press | News | Comments

A tiny minnow that lives only in backwaters in Oregon's Willamette Valley is the first fish to be formally removed from Endangered Species Act protection because it is no longer in danger of extinction.          

Health Groups Say AIDS No. 1 Killer of Adolescents in Africa

February 17, 2015 3:47 pm | by Tom Odula, Associated Press | News | Comments

Global health organizations said Tuesday that AIDS is now the leading cause of death for adolescents in Africa, and the second leading cause of death among adolescents globally.              

How Technology Can Block Our Creativity

February 17, 2015 2:21 pm | by Ryan Bushey, Associate Editor | Videos | Comments

The Atlantic's James Hamblin explores how our obsession with smartphones could stifle creative impulses.                              

Researchers Test Device to Help Deaf Children Detect Sounds

February 17, 2015 10:28 am | by Lauran Neergaard, AP Medical Writer | News | Comments

The device goes beyond cochlear implants that have brought hearing to many deaf children but that don't work for tots who lack their hearing nerve.                   

Two Cell-Signaling Molecules Found to Suppress the Spread of Melanoma

February 17, 2015 10:21 am | by NYU Langone | News | Comments

Findings advance efforts to identify who would benefit from more aggressive therapy at earliest stages.                          

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Australian Project to Combat Myanmar Snake Deaths

February 17, 2015 9:54 am | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

Australia is funding a three-year, 2.3 million Australian dollar ($1.8 million) project that will aid snakebite victims in Myanmar by upgrading care facilities and the quality and availability of antivenom.         

Ebola Victims Infectious for a Week After Death, Nonhuman Primate Study Finds

February 13, 2015 4:32 pm | by Elizabeth Doughman, Editor-in-Chief, ALN Magazine | News | Comments

The Ebola virus remains viable for at least seven days after death in non-human primates. A new study, published in Emerging Infectious Diseases, suggests that Ebola transmission from deceased individuals may be possible for an extended period of time after death, underscoring the importance of using safe practices for handling corpses.  

Beavers Show Way to Improve Enamel

February 13, 2015 3:57 pm | by Washington University in St. Louis | News | Comments

Beavers don’t brush their teeth, and they don’t drink fluoridated water, but a new study reports beavers do have protection against tooth decay built into the chemical structure of their teeth.           

CDC: Nasty Flu Season has Peaked

February 13, 2015 3:41 pm | by Mike Stobbe, AP Medical Writer | News | Comments

This winter's nasty flu season has peaked and is clearly retreating, a new government report shows.                           

Nearly 200 Pilot Whales Stranded on New Zealand Beach

February 13, 2015 3:33 pm | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

Nearly 200 pilot whales stranded themselves on New Zealand's South Island on Friday, and hordes of rescuers rushed to the remote area in a bid to guide them back to sea.               

Search Engine Helps Predict Gene Function

February 13, 2015 3:27 pm | by Kimberlee D'Ardenne, Stanford University | News | Comments

The Human Genome Project wrapped up over a decade ago, yet around a third of the genome remains mysterious, its function unknown.                      

Aggressive Form of HIV Uncovered in Cuba

February 12, 2015 2:42 pm | by University of Leuven | News | Comments

Engaging in unprotected sex with multiple partners increases the risk of contracting multiple strains of HIV, the virus that causes AIDS. Once inside a host, these strains can recombine into a new variant of the virus.       

Apes Prefer the Glass Half Full

February 12, 2015 2:27 pm | by Duke University | News | Comments

Humans aren’t the only species to be influenced by spin. Our closest primate relatives are susceptible, too.                         

Oil Drilling Banned in Artic Area That Attracts Walrus

February 12, 2015 2:12 pm | by Dan Joling, Associated Press | News | Comments

A plateau on the Arctic Ocean floor, where thousands of Pacific walrus gather to feed and raise pups, has received new protections from the Obama administration that recognize it as a biological hot spot and mark it off-limits to future oil drilling.  

Sequence of Genetic Mutations Determines How Cancer Behaves

February 12, 2015 10:15 am | News | Comments

Most of the genetic mutations that cause cancer result from environmental ‘damage’ (for example, through smoking or as a result of over-exposure to sunlight) or from spontaneous errors as cells divide. 

HPV Vaccination Not Linked to Riskier Sex

February 12, 2015 10:08 am | News | Comments

Receiving the human papillomavirus vaccine does not increase rates of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) in adolescent females. The vaccine, which can prevent cervical cancer in women, has had a low uptake, partly because of concerns about how it will affect adolescent sexual activity.

Smartphone Apps Just as Accurate as Wearable Devices: Study

February 12, 2015 10:04 am | News | Comments

Although wearable devices have received significant attention for their ability to track an individual’s physical activity, most smartphone applications are just as accurate, according to a new research letter in JAMA.              

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