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Lift Weights, Improve Your Memory

October 1, 2014 1:29 pm | Videos | Comments

Here’s another reason why it’s a good idea to hit the gym: it can improve memory. A new study shows that an intense workout of as little as 20 minutes can enhance episodic memory, also known as long-term memory for previous events, by about 10 percent in healthy young adults.

Child Dies from Enterovirus 68 Complications

October 1, 2014 12:37 pm | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

The Rhode Island Health Department says a child has died from complications of an unusual respiratory virus that has been affecting children across the U.S.                           

10 Questions, Answers About the U.S. Ebola Case

October 1, 2014 3:36 am | by Lauran Neergaard - AP Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

U.S. health officials have warned for months that someone infected with Ebola could unknowingly carry the virus to this country, and there is word now that it has happened: A traveler in a Dallas hospital became the first patient diagnosed in the U.S.

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Early Antibiotic Use Linked to Childhood Obesity Risk

September 30, 2014 2:22 pm | News | Comments

The use of broad-spectrum antibiotics by children before the age of 24 months was associated with increased risk of obesity in early childhood, according to a new study.                       

Drug and Device Firms Paid $3.5B to Care Providers

September 30, 2014 2:02 pm | by Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

Striving to shine a light on potential ethical conflicts in medicine, the Obama administration is releasing data on drug company payments to tens of thousands of individual doctors.                    

Modeling Shockwaves Through the Brain

September 30, 2014 2:00 pm | News | Comments

Researchers have developed a scaling law that predicts a human’s risk of brain injury, based on previous studies of blasts’ effects on animal brains. The method may help the military develop more protective helmets, as well as aid clinicians in diagnosing traumatic brain injury.

Breaking News: Six Changing Faces of ‘Global Killer’ Bacteria

September 30, 2014 11:22 am | News | Comments

Researchers have shown for the first time that a genetic switch allows Streptococcus pneumoniae to randomly change its characteristics into six alternative states.                          

Study Examines Cancer Risk from First Atom-bomb Test

September 30, 2014 8:30 am | by Susan Montoya Bryan - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

Researchers from the National Cancer Institute want to know how many past and present cancer cases in New Mexico may be related to the U.S. government's test of the world's first atomic bomb over a remote stretch of desert nearly 70 years ago.  

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U.S. Ebola Labs, Parts for Clinic Arrive in Liberia

September 30, 2014 5:37 am | by Jonathan Paye-Layleh - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

U.S. mobile Ebola labs should be up and running in Liberia this week, and American troops have broken ground for a field hospital, as the international community races to increase the ability to care for the spiraling number of people infected with the dreaded disease.

Cord Blood Stem Cells Increased Tenfold

September 29, 2014 2:34 pm | by Cynthia Fox | Articles | Comments

Ten times more stem cells may soon be generated from umbilical cords than ever before, according to a new Science study. The potential advance was made via a little-known pyrimidoindole molecule called UM171.

Scientists Identify Signature of Aging in the Brain

September 29, 2014 1:14 pm | News | Comments

How the brain ages is still largely an open question– in part because this organ is mostly insulated from direct contact with other systems in the body, including the blood and immune systems. Now, new research may have found evidence of a unique “signature” that may be the “missing link” between cognitive decline and aging.

Protein that Causes Frontotemporal Dementia also Implicated in Alzheimer’s

September 29, 2014 12:56 pm | News | Comments

Researchers have shown that low levels of the protein progranulin in the brain can increase the formation of amyloid-beta plaques (a hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease), cause neuroinflammation, and worsen memory deficits in a mouse model of this condition.

Biologists Find an Early Sign of Pancreatic Cancer

September 29, 2014 12:39 pm | News | Comments

Years before they show any other signs of disease, pancreatic cancer patients have very high levels of certain amino acids in their bloodstream, according to a new study.                        

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Chikungunya Spreading in Latin America

September 29, 2014 8:30 am | by Ezequiel Abiu Lopez - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

An excruciating mosquito-borne illness that arrived less than a year ago in the Americas is raging across the region, leaping from the Caribbean to the Central and South American mainland, and infecting more than 1 million people.      

Virus Probed in Paralysis Cases in 9 Colorado Kids

September 29, 2014 8:30 am | by Mike Stobbe - AP Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

Health officials are investigating nine cases of muscle weakness or paralysis in Colorado children and whether the culprit might be a virus causing severe respiratory illness across the country.                 

U.S. Doctor Exposed to Ebola Virus Admitted to NIH

September 28, 2014 5:35 pm | News | Comments

An American doctor who was exposed to the Ebola virus while volunteering in Sierra Leone has been admitted for observation at The National Institutes of Health near the nation's capital. NIH confirmed in a news release on its website that the physician arrived Sunday.

At Least Two Regions of the Brain Decide What We Perceive

September 26, 2014 8:30 am | News | Comments

Tests on the brains of macaques have shown that neurons in at least two regions of the brain, the temporal and frontal lobes, are responsible for deciding which impressions reach our consciousness.                

Simple Blood Test a Possible Tool for Early Cancer Diagnosis

September 26, 2014 8:30 am | News | Comments

High levels of calcium in blood, a condition known as hypercalcemia, can be used by GPs as an early indication of certain types of cancer, according to a new study.                          

Alzheimer's Patients Can Feel the Emotion After the Memories Have Vanished

September 26, 2014 8:30 am | News | Comments

A new study further supports an inescapable message: caregivers have a profound influence— good or bad— on the emotional state of individuals with Alzheimer’s disease.                       

How a Single, Genetic Change Causes Retinal Tumors in Children

September 26, 2014 8:30 am | News | Comments

New research has answered the long-standing question of why mutations to the RB1 gene primarily cause tumors of the retina and not of other cell types. The study could reveal new cellular signaling pathways relevant to retinal development, cancer development, and ultimately, the development of novel therapies.

Chemists Recruit Anthrax to Deliver Cancer Drugs

September 26, 2014 8:30 am | News | Comments

Bacillus anthracis bacteria have very efficient machinery for injecting toxic proteins into cells, leading to the potentially deadly infection known as anthrax. A team of researchers has now hijacked that delivery system for a different purpose: administering cancer drugs.

First Mouse Model for ALS Dementia Developed

September 25, 2014 8:30 am | News | Comments

The first animal model for ALS dementia, a form of ALS that also damages the brain, has been developed by scientists. The advance will allow researchers to directly see the brains of living mice, under anesthesia, at the microscopic level.   

Pancreatic Cancer Insight

September 25, 2014 8:30 am | News | Comments

An analysis of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in a mouse model of pancreatic cancer has identified distinct patterns of gene expression in several groups of these cells, including significant differences from the primary tumor that may contribute to their ability to spread.

Study Supports Camels as Primary Source of MERS-CoV Transmission

September 25, 2014 8:30 am | News | Comments

Scientists have provided experimental evidence supporting dromedary camels as the primary reservoir, or carrier, of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV).                       

Toward Better Treatments for Autoimmune Diseases, Bone Loss

September 25, 2014 8:30 am | News | Comments

Scientists have developed an approach to creating treatments for osteoporosis and autoimmune diseases that may avoid the risk of infection and cancer posed by some current medications.                   

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