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23andMe, Genentech to Collaborate on Parkinson's Data Project

January 8, 2015 1:47 pm | News | Comments

23andMe and Genentech team up to generate whole genome sequencing data for approximately 3,000 people in 23andMe's Parkinson's disease community.                   

The Divergent Skull

January 7, 2015 4:38 pm | by Peter Reuell. Harvard Gazette | News | Comments

New study provides a detailed look at how frog and salamander skulls develop, and shows that the pattern for frogs is different than that of other vertebrates.                 

Radiation, Hormone Therapy Prolong Survival for Older Men With Prostate Cancer

January 7, 2015 4:30 pm | by University of Pennsylvania | News | Comments

Adding radiation treatment to hormone therapy saves more lives among older men with locally advanced prostate therapy than hormone therapy alone.                   

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The Best Offense Against Bacteria is a Good Defense

January 7, 2015 4:17 pm | by Ohio State University | News | Comments

A small protein active in the human immune response can disable bacterial toxins by exploiting a property that makes the toxins effective.                     

Trying for Test-Tube Baby? Risks to Mom Are Rare

January 7, 2015 4:01 pm | by Lindsey Tanner - AP Medical Writer | News | Comments

A new 12-year U.S. study shows the most frequent involve drugs used to stimulate ovaries, but it suggests problems are rarely fatal.                      

Genetic Clue Points to Most Vulnerable Children

January 7, 2015 9:32 am | by Duke University | News | Comments

Some children are more sensitive to their environments, for better and for worse. Now Duke University researchers have identified a gene variant that may serve as a marker for these children, who are among society’s most vulnerable.  

Researchers Map Direct Gut-Brain Connection

January 7, 2015 9:29 am | by Duke University | News | Comments

Researchers at Duke University have now mapped out another system, a cell-to-cell connection between the gut and the nervous system, that may be more direct than the release of hormones in the blood.              

How Bacteria Control Their Size

January 7, 2015 9:21 am | by WUSTL | News | Comments

Scientists have traditionally studied bacteria in large numbers, not individually. Working with tens of millions of cells in a culture flask, they tracked their growth by looking at how much the cells dimmed light passing through a tube.

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Genome Editing Tool Shows Promise in Engineering Human Stem Cells

January 5, 2015 4:21 pm | by Johns Hopkins University | News | Comments

Scientists discovered that a genome editing tool can precisely and efficiently alter human stem cells.                        

Researchers Use Nanotech to Engineer ACL Replacements

January 5, 2015 4:15 pm | by Northwestern University | News | Comments

No other injury has sidelined more athletes for a season or even the rest of a career.                             

Researchers Study Potential Blood Test for Prostate Cancer

January 5, 2015 4:11 pm | by Vanderbilt University | News | Comments

Vanderbilt University researcher William Mitchell, M.D., Ph.D., and colleagues in Germany and Canada have demonstrated a method for detecting “cell-free” tumor DNA in the bloodstream.                            

Technology Detects Lingering Cancer Cells During Breast Surgery

January 5, 2015 3:57 pm | by NYU | News | Comments

Patients are benefitting from new technology that detects microscopic amounts of cancer cells on removed tumor tissue not visible during or following surgical intervention.               

Pacific Coast Sea Bird Die-Off Puzzles Scientists

January 5, 2015 10:42 am | by Associated Press | News | Comments

Scientists are trying to figure out what's behind the deaths of seabirds that have been found by the hundreds along the Pacific Coast since October.                                                 

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New Version of Antibiotic Could Eliminate Risk of Hearing Loss

January 5, 2015 10:22 am | by Tracie White, Stanford University | News | Comments

Researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine report that they have developed a modified version of an aminoglycoside that works effectively in mice without the risk of causing deafness or kidney damage, another common side effect.

A Fascinating Year in Breast Cancer Advances

January 5, 2015 8:50 am | by Cynthia Fox, Science Writer | Articles | Comments

Some of the most important advances in breast cancer this year were related to all kinds of heterogeneity: within tumors, between tumors in a single patient, and between tumors in early and later stages, according to oncologists speaking at conferences, and contacted by Bioscience Technology.

CDC Begins Search for Lab Safety Chief

January 2, 2015 4:29 pm | by Ryan Bushey, Associate Editor | Articles | Comments

The CDC is creating this position after several embarrasing mishaps with hazardous material last year.                           

Connecting Cellular Aging to Human Aging

January 2, 2015 1:59 pm | by Nora Dunne, Northwestern University | News | Comments

A study has linked aging at the cellular level to overall human aging through a molecular interaction involving two proteins and chromosome ends called telomeres.                 

Possible Treatment Found for Infections Caused by Enterovirus

January 2, 2015 9:34 am | News | Comments

New research findings point toward a class of compounds that could be effective in combating infections caused by enterovirus D68, which has stricken children with serious respiratory infections and might be associated with polio-like symptoms in the United States and elsewhere.

Targeting the Cell's 'Biological Clock' in Promising New Cancer Therapy

January 2, 2015 9:22 am | News | Comments

Cell biologists at UT Southwestern Medical Center have targeted telomeres with a small molecule called 6-thiodG that takes advantage of the cell’s “biological clock” to kill cancer cells and shrink tumor growth.                                  

Researchers: IMF Policies Hindered Ebola Response

December 30, 2014 3:47 pm | by Michelle Faul - Associated Press | News | Comments

Professors from three leading British universities say International Monetary Fund policies favoring international debt repayment over social spending contributed to the Ebola crisis by hampering health care in the three worst-hit West African countries. 

Blink Assesment is Essential for Protecting Long-Term Vision in Face Transplant Patients

December 30, 2014 3:10 pm | by NYU | News | Comments

Face transplantation can dramatically enhance a patient’s quality of life after severe facial trauma.                           

Lyme Disease Enhances Spread of Emerging Tick Infection

December 30, 2014 3:02 pm | by Michael Greenwood, Yale University | News | Comments

Mice that are already infected with the pathogen that causes Lyme disease appear to facilitate the spread of a lesser-known but emerging disease, babesiosis, into new areas.               

Tracing Evolution of Chicken Virus Yields Insight into Deadly Strain

December 29, 2014 4:57 pm | by St. Judes Children's Hospital | News | Comments

An international research team has shown how changes in a flu virus that has plagued Chinese poultry farms for decades helped create the novel avian influenza.                 

Binge Drinking Disrupts Immune System in Young Adults

December 29, 2014 4:46 pm | by Loyola University | News | Comments

Binge drinking in young, healthy adults significantly disrupts the immune system.                              

Protein Identified as Possible Therapy Target for Viral and Bacterial Infections

December 29, 2014 4:39 pm | by Virginia Commonwealth University | News | Comments

A protein could be a universal therapeutic target for treating human diseases like brain cancer, Ebola, Influenza, Hepatitis and superbug bacteria.                   

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