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Researchers Say Off-Label Use of Device to Prevent Stroke May Be Dangerous

May 5, 2015 11:22 am | by University of Pennsylvania | News | Comments

Findings suggest need for FDA reassessment of safety and efficacy of devices for off-label use.

How Studying Bat Touch Could Help Build Better Planes

May 4, 2015 10:45 am | by Columbia University | News | Comments

A study published April 30 in Cell Reports shows, for the first time, that a unique array of sensory receptors in the wing provides feedback to a bat during flight. The findings also suggest that neurons in the bat brain respond to incoming airflow and touch signals, triggering rapid adjustments in wing position to optimize flight control.

Prolonged Statin Use May Lower Risk of Lung Cancer Death

May 4, 2015 10:26 am | by American Association for Cancer Research | News | Comments

Lung cancer patients who used statins in the year prior to a lung cancer diagnosis or after a lung cancer diagnosis had a reduction in the risk of death from the disease, according to a study published in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research.

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How to Short-Circuit Hunger

May 4, 2015 10:20 am | by Harvard University | News | Comments

Artificially activating a neural link in mice can reduce eating without chronic hunger.

New Sea Star Babies Offer Hope Amid Mass Deaths in Pacific

May 4, 2015 9:21 am | by Phuong Le, Associated Press | News | Comments

Emerging from a recent dive 40 feet below the surface of Puget Sound, biologist Ben Miner wasn't surprised by what he found: The troubling disease that wiped out millions of sea stars up and down the West Coast had not spared this site along the rocky cliffs of Lopez Island.

Space madness: Long-term Space Trips Could Impair Astronaut Brains

May 1, 2015 2:59 pm | by Seth Augenstein, Digital Reporter | Articles | Comments

When NASA first began sending astronauts out into space, they worried about “space madness” – a malady they thought weightlessness and claustrophobia would trigger out beyond the atmosphere of the earth. It never materialized. But they may have been on to something.

Warp Speed? NASA May Have Made a Breakthrough for Galactic Travel

May 1, 2015 11:43 am | by Seth Augenstein, Digital Reporter | Articles | Comments

A group of NASA scientists developing technology to make interstellar spaceflight possible by the end of the century may have reached a watershed moment.

Study: Global Warming to Push 1 in 13 Species to Extinction

May 1, 2015 10:29 am | by Seth Borenstein, Associated Press Science Writer | News | Comments

Global warming will eventually push 1 out of every 13 species on Earth into extinction, a new study projects.

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A New Way to Think About Migraines

May 1, 2015 9:28 am | by Bevin Fletcher, Associate Editor | Articles | Comments

This is the second of three research findings highlighted by Dr. Rost, vice chair of the American Academy of Neurology Science Committee, at the AAN 67th annual meeting.

Walking Two Minutes an Hour Lengthens Life

May 1, 2015 8:55 am | by Seth Augenstein, Digital Reporter | Articles | Comments

Want to live longer? Get up from that desk, at least once an hour. Walking two minutes every hour means a longer life. Sitting for a long time strongly increases the risk of death

Chipotle Tosses GMOs, but Will Other Restaurants Follow?

April 30, 2015 11:37 am | by Seth Augenstein, Digital Reporter | Articles | Comments

The national fast-food chain rid its menu of genetically-modified ingredients this week, but other restaurants might not find it as easy to go cold-turkey from the genetically engineering crops currently dominating the market.

Transfection Tips and Tricks

April 30, 2015 9:53 am | by Andrea Toell, Ph.D., Product Manager at Lonza Walkersville, Inc. | Articles | Comments

Transfection is used to modify cells for a wide range of applications, from basic research looking to understand gene function, to establishing disease models, developing new therapeutics, bioprocessing and biomanufacturing. The process hinges upon transferring a substrate into a cell to achieve a desired outcome.

Is the World Failing in Fight Against Antibiotic Resistance?

April 30, 2015 9:06 am | by Bevin Fletcher, Associate Editor | Articles | Comments

Only 34 out of 133 countries participating in the recent survey of countries in the six WHO regions have a comprehensive national plan to fight resistance to antibiotics and other antimicrobial medicines.

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3 Boys Saved by Customized Airway Tube Made on 3-D Printer

April 30, 2015 9:04 am | by Lauren Neergaard, Associated Press Medical Writer | News | Comments

In a striking example of how 3-D printers could customize medical care, doctors turned powdered plastic into tiny devices that saved the lives of three baby boys by holding open defective airways so they could breathe - and the implants even expanded as the tots grew.

Cardiorespiratory Fitness Contributes to Successful Brain Aging

April 29, 2015 10:08 am | by Boston University | News | Comments

Cardiorespiratory fitness may positively impact the structure of white matter in the brains of older adults. These results suggest that exercise could be prescribed to lessen age-related declines in brain structure.

Rare Dune Plants Thrive on Disturbance

April 29, 2015 9:53 am | by Washington University in St. Louis | News | Comments

Stabilizing dunes suppresses native species and makes the dunes themselves more prone to erosion.

Sleep Apnea? There May Be an App for That

April 29, 2015 8:52 am | by Seth Augenstein, Digital Reporter | Articles | Comments

Millions of Americans are short of breath while they sleep. Approximately one in 13 in the U.S. have sleep apnea. But to diagnose the disease involves an overnight hospital stay and a sleep study that costs thousands of dollars. A group of researchers at the University of Washington now say they have an app for that – a cheap alternative on a smartphone that could be available widely in a year or two to diagnose the disorder.

Genetic Testing Moves into World of Employee Health

April 28, 2015 4:32 pm | by Tom Murphy, Associated Press Business Writer | News | Comments

Your employer may one day help determine if your genes are why your jeans have become too snug.

Genocea's GEN-003 in Prime Position to Lead GH Vaccine Space

April 28, 2015 1:08 pm | by Daian Cheng, Ph.D., GlobalData Infectious Disease Analyst | Articles | Comments

An analysis of Genocea Biosciences’ investigational genital herpes (GH) vaccine, GEN-003. 

Microneedle Patch for Measles Vaccination Could be Global Game Changer

April 28, 2015 10:08 am | by Georgia Institute of Technology | News | Comments

A new microneedle patch being developed by the Georgia Institute of Technology and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) could make it easier to vaccinate people against measles and other vaccine-preventable diseases.

Study Blames Global Warming for 75 Percent of Very Hot Days

April 28, 2015 9:53 am | by Seth Borenstein, Associated Press Science Writer | News | Comments

If you find yourself sweating out a day that is monstrously hot, chances are you can blame humanity. A new report links three out of four such days to man's effects on climate.

Researchers ID Brain Mechanisms Underlying Alertness and Attentiveness

April 28, 2015 9:18 am | by MIT | News | Comments

First demonstration that a common neurotransmitter acts via a single neuron type to enable effective information-processing.

Ebola Scare May Inform U.S.'s Response to Bioterrorism

April 28, 2015 8:48 am | by Seth Augenstein, Digital Reporter | Articles | Comments

Last year’s Ebola scare might provide a blueprint for a response to the unthinkable: a bioterrorist attack in the U.S., some experts are saying. A House of Representatives subcommittee last week discussed what the domestic response – and over-response – may teach emergency responders in a “low probability” but “high-consequence” event.

Late Spring Complicates Already Perilous Amphibian Migration

April 27, 2015 10:38 am | by Holly Ramer, Associated Press | News | Comments

Northern New England's annual amphibian migration is always perilous, but critters that cross roads to breed are facing an additional challenge this year: a delayed start after the long winter.

Diabetes Drug Found in Freshwater, Potential Cause of Intersex Fish

April 27, 2015 10:29 am | by University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee | News | Comments

A medication commonly taken for Type II diabetes, which is being found in freshwater systems worldwide, has been shown to cause intersex in fish -male fish that produce eggs.

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