Advertisement
Industries
Subscribe to Industries
View Sample

FREE Email Newsletter

Plant Extract Fights Brain Tumor

February 10, 2015 5:06 pm | by Max Planck Society | News | Comments

Silibinin has an outstanding safety profile in humans and is currently used for the treatment of liver disease and poisoning.                                                     

Babies Identify Complex Social Situations

February 10, 2015 5:02 pm | by University of Missouri-Columbia | News | Comments

In the social world, people constantly gather information through visual cues that are used to evaluate others and interact. A new study from researchers at the University of Missouri determined that babies can make sense of complex social situations, and that they expect people to behave appropriately.     

Screening Tool Could Speed Ovarian Cancer Drug Development

February 10, 2015 4:56 pm | by University of Chicago | News | Comments

University of Chicago Medicine researchers have built a model system that uses multiple cell types from patients to rapidly test compounds that could block the early steps in ovarian cancer metastasis. Their three-dimensional cell-culture system, adapted for high-throughput screening, has enabled them to identify small molecules that can inhibit adhesion and invasion, preventing ovarian cancers from spreading to nearby tissues.

Advertisement

New Cellular Pathway Defect in Cystinosis

February 10, 2015 4:41 pm | by Scripps Research Institute | News | Comments

Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have identified a new cellular pathway that is affected in cystinosis, a rare genetic disorder that can result in eye and kidney damage.                                 

90 Percent Approve of Cancer Screening But Uptake is Lower

February 10, 2015 4:35 pm | by Cancer Research UK | News | Comments

The researchers, from Cancer Research UK's Health Behaviour Research Centre at University College London (UCL), interviewed almost 1,900 people aged 50-80 years old about their views on cancer screening.                   

Coral Snake Venom Reveals Unique Route to Lethality

February 10, 2015 9:34 am | by Johns Hopkins University | News | Comments

A vial of rare snake venom refused to give up its secret formula for lethality; its toxins had no effect on the proteins that most venoms target.                   

Startup Uses Google Glass to Improve Patient-Physician Relationship

February 10, 2015 9:28 am | by Tracie White, Stanford Medical School | News | Comments

Firsthand experience working in hospitals and clinics helped inspire third-year Stanford medical student Pelu Tran to explore a potential career path in the world of high-tech startups.             

Persevering Past Roadblocks to Build Promising Ebola Vaccine

February 10, 2015 9:08 am | by Lauran Neergard - AP Medical Writer | News | Comments

Ebola has claimed nearly 9,000 lives in West Africa over the past year, although new infections have dropped dramatically in recent months.                    

Advertisement

Senate Approves Ex-Mass Official as U.S. Drug Czar

February 10, 2015 9:00 am | by Matthew Daly - Associated Press | News | Comments

President Barack Obama's nominee to serve as U.S. drug "czar" won unanimous approval in the Senate Monday as lawmakers vowed to curb an epidemic that results in more than 40,000 deaths a year from overdoses of prescription painkillers, heroin and other substances.

Impact of Obesity on Fertility Can be Reversed

February 10, 2015 8:56 am | by University of Adelaide | News | Comments

Researchers have revealed how damage from obesity is passed from a mother to her children, and also how that damage can be reversed.                      

Tests Show NFL Brain Damage May Linger, Start Young

February 9, 2015 2:42 pm | by Cynthia Fox, Science Writer | Articles | Comments

After the highly charged Super Bowl, two sobering studies emerged. One unveiled an improved molecular imaging technology that verified—and precisely identified—brain damage in some National Football League (NFL) players. The other study revealed that brain damage can be more severe in NFL players who start playing football before age 12.

Cow Immune System Inspires Potential New Therapies

February 6, 2015 12:19 pm | by The Scripps Research Institute | News | Comments

Scientists have developed a potential new therapy based on an unlikely model: immune molecules from cows.                          

Brazil Scientists Fear Golden Mussel Threat to Amazon River

February 6, 2015 12:14 pm | by Jenny Barchfield - Associated Press | News | Comments

The world's mightiest waterway, the Amazon River, is threatened by the most diminutive of foes - a tiny mussel invading from China.                      

Advertisement

Highlighting Brain Cells' Role in Navigating Environment

February 5, 2015 3:13 pm | by Dartmouth University | News | Comments

A new Dartmouth College study sheds light on the brain cells that function in establishing one's location and direction. The findings contribute to our understanding of the neural mechanisms underlying our abilities to successfully navigate our environment, which may be crucial to dealing with brain damage due to trauma or a stroke and the onset of diseases such as Alzheimer's.

Unlocking Fat

February 5, 2015 2:57 pm | by Peter Reuell, Harvard | News | Comments

Have you ever wondered why it’s so tough to put down that last slice of bacon? Part of the answer is that humans are evolutionarily programmed to crave fatty foods, which offer the biggest bang for the buck, nutritionally speaking, with more than twice the calorie density of protein- or starch-rich food.

SuperAger Brains Yield New Clues To Memories

February 5, 2015 2:36 pm | by Northwestern | News | Comments

SuperAgers, aged 80 and above, have distinctly different looking brains than those of normal older people, according to new Northwestern Medicine research that is beginning to reveal why the memories of these cognitively elite elders don’t suffer the usual ravages of time.

Tackling Cancer With a New Paradigm

February 5, 2015 2:33 pm | by Yale | News | Comments

In the 1980s, immunotherapy researcher Lieping Chen, M.D., Ph.D., embraced the career goal of curing one cancer. That lofty-seeming goal is beginning to look more modest today. Recent clinical trials have shown that one cancer after another is vulnerable to immune modulation therapy, a cancer-fighting strategy Chen pioneered that for years was considered marginal.

New Source of Cells for Modeling Malaria

February 5, 2015 2:29 pm | by MIT | News | Comments

In 2008, the World Health Organization announced a global effort to eradicate malaria, which kills about 800,000 people every year. As part of that goal, scientists are trying to develop new drugs that target the malaria parasite during the stage when it infects the human liver, which is crucial because some strains of malaria can lie dormant in the liver for several years before flaring up.

7 Myths About the Measles Vaccine

February 5, 2015 2:25 pm | by Columbia Univ. | News | Comments

Since December, more than 100 people in 14 states have been infected with measles in an outbreak traced to Disneyland, Melissa Stockwell, MD, MPH, assistant professor of pediatrics and of population & family health, has spoken out to debunk seven myths about the measles vaccine.

Disneyland Measles Outbreak Isn't Largest in Recent Memory

February 5, 2015 2:23 pm | by Associated Press | News | Comments

The largest U.S. measles outbreak in recent history isn't the one that started in December at Disneyland. It happened months earlier in Ohio's Amish country, where 383 people fell ill after unvaccinated Amish missionaries traveled to the Philippines and returned with the virus.

Ebola Drug Study Canceled Due to Declining Cases

February 4, 2015 2:54 pm | by Associated Press | News | Comments

The drop-off in Ebola infections is good news for Liberia, but it means there are not enough sick people to take part in the study.                      

Federal Health Officials Face Tough Questions on Flu Vaccines

February 4, 2015 2:51 pm | by Lauran Neergard - AP Medical Writer | News | Comments

Federal health officials faced tough questions from lawmakers Tuesday about why they didn't take steps to produce a better flu vaccine as it became clear that this year's version wasn't going to offer much protection.       

Stem Cell Therapy Shows Promise for MS Patients

February 4, 2015 2:41 pm | by Nora Dunne, Northwestern University | News | Comments

A preliminary study suggests stem cell transplantation may reverse disability and improve quality of life for patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis.                

Fewer Viral Relics May Be Due to a Less Bloody Evolutionary History

February 4, 2015 2:36 pm | by University of Oxford | News | Comments

Humans have fewer remnants of viral DNA in their genes compared to other mammals.                              

Evolutionary Explanation of Walking

February 4, 2015 10:41 am | by Peter Reuell, Harvard News | News | Comments

For decades, scientists have recognized the upright posture exhibited by chimpanzees, gorillas, and humans as a key feature separating the “great apes” from other primates, but a host of questions about the evolution of that posture — particularly how and when it emerged — have long gone unanswered.

X
You may login with either your assigned username or your e-mail address.
The password field is case sensitive.
Loading