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Breaking News: Mutant Worms Can’t Get Drunk

July 16, 2014 8:30 am | News | Comments

Neuroscientists have generated mutant worms that do not get intoxicated by alcohol, a result that could lead to new drugs to treat the symptoms of people going through alcohol withdrawal.                   

New Brain Protein Tied to Alzheimer's Disease

July 16, 2014 3:20 am | by Marilynn Marchione - AP Chief Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

Scientists have linked a new protein to Alzheimer's disease, different from the amyloid and tau that make up the sticky brain plaques and tangles long known to be its hallmarks.                      

One for the Aged

July 15, 2014 2:32 pm | by Skip Derra | Articles | Comments

What we currently know about aging is not highly specific; our cells divide many times throughout our lives and eventually cause organs and our bodies to age, break down and fail. New research, however, suggests that how we age might depend on cellular interactions that we inherit from our ancestors, accumulating throughout many generations.

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Study Pinpoints Damage Alcohol Causes to the Brain

July 15, 2014 12:55 pm | News | Comments

New research has identified, for the first time, the structural damage at a molecular level that excessive alcohol abuse causes to the brain. The study detected the loss and modification of several key cellular proteins in the brains of alcoholics.

Proof: Parkinson's Enhances Creativity

July 15, 2014 12:11 pm | News | Comments

Two years ago, the exceptional creativity of Parkinson's patients was demonstrated in a review for Behavioral Neuroscience. Now, a new empirical study definitively demonstrates that Parkinson's patients are more creative than their healthy peers.

One in Three Alzheimer’s Cases Potentially Preventable, Study Says

July 14, 2014 12:02 pm | News | Comments

A third of Alzheimer’s disease cases worldwide can be attributed to risk factors that can be potentially modified, such as lack of education and physical inactivity, according to new research.                 

When Good Gut Bacteria Get Sick

July 14, 2014 11:46 am | News | Comments

Being sick due to an infection can make us feel lousy. But what must the ecosystem of bacteria, or microbiota, colonizing our guts be going through when hit with infection? A new study has utilized unique computational models to show how infection can affect bacteria that naturally live in our intestines.

Aronia Berry Gaining Foothold in U.S.

July 14, 2014 8:20 am | by Margery A. Beck - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

A new fruit that research says packs more antioxidants than popular "superfoods" like blueberries, acai berries and goji berries is establishing itself in the aisles of mainstream grocery stores, showing up in everything from juices to powdered supplements to baby food.

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Got a Rash? iPad, Other Devices Might be the Cause

July 14, 2014 12:20 am | by Lindsey Tanner - AP Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

Unexplained rash? Check your iPad. It turns out the popular tablet computer may contain nickel, one of the most common allergy-inducing metals. Recent reports in medical journals detail nickel allergies from a variety of personal electronic devices, including laptops and cellphones.

Climate Change May Bring More Kidney Stones

July 11, 2014 1:57 pm | Videos | Comments

As daily temperatures increase, so does the number of patients seeking treatment for kidney stones. In a study that may both reflect and foretell a warming planet’s impact on human health, a research team found a link between hot days and kidney stones in 60,000 patients in several U.S. cities with varying climates.

Omega 3 Fatty Acids Lessen Severity of Osteoarthritis in Mice

July 11, 2014 1:06 pm | News | Comments

Mice consuming a supplement of omega 3 fatty acids had healthier joints than those fed diets high in saturated fats and omega 6 fatty acids, according to researchers.                        

Gene Therapy Brings ALS Cure One Step Closer

July 11, 2014 12:44 pm | News | Comments

Researchers have moved one step closer to a gene therapy that could silence the faulty SOD1 gene responsible for triggering a form of motor neuron disease also known as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS).             

Girl Hoped to Have Been Cured of HIV Has Relapsed

July 11, 2014 8:30 am | by Marilynn Marchione - AP Chief Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

A Mississippi girl born with the AIDS virus and in remission for years despite stopping treatment now shows signs that she still harbors HIV — and therefore is not cured.                       

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Viral Evasion: How Measles, Nipah Elude Detection

July 9, 2014 4:39 pm | News | Comments

Scientists have discovered that measles and Nipah viruses manipulate the phosphorylation state of the immune sensor MDA5, keeping it inactive while the virus enters cells and replicates.                   

Vitamin D Ups Bowel Cancer Survival

July 9, 2014 4:31 pm | News | Comments

Bowel cancer patients with high levels of vitamin D in their blood are more likely to survive the disease, a new study shows. Patients with the highest levels of vitamin D have half the risk of dying compared with those with the lowest levels, the findings reveal.

Rotten Egg Gas Holds Key to Healthcare Therapies

July 9, 2014 4:28 pm | News | Comments

It may smell awful and have a reputation for being highly toxic, but when used in the right tiny dosage, hydrogen sulfide is now being found to offer potential health benefits in a range of issues, from diabetes to stroke, heart attacks and dementia.

Bacteria Hijack Plentiful Iron Supply Source to Flourish

July 9, 2014 4:21 pm | News | Comments

In an era of increasing concern about the prevalence of antibiotic-resistant illness, researchers have identified a promising new pathway to disabling disease: blocking bacteria’s access to iron in the body.             

No Extra Mutations in Modified Stem Cells, Study Finds

July 9, 2014 4:16 pm | News | Comments

Scientists have proven that using gene-editing techniques on stem cells doesn't increase the overall occurrence of mutations in the cells.                                

New Mutations Found in Most Common Form of Lung Cancer

July 9, 2014 3:54 pm | News | Comments

Researchers have identified novel mutations in a well-known cancer-causing pathway in lung adenocarcinoma, the most common subtype of lung cancer. Knowledge of these genomic changes may expand the number of possible therapeutic targets for this disease and potentially identify a greater number of patients with treatable mutations because many potent cancer drugs that target these mutations already exist.

Not at Home on the Range

July 9, 2014 3:44 pm | News | Comments

As climate change shifts the geographic ranges in which animals can be found, concern mounts over the effect it has on their parasites. Does an increased range for a host mean new territory for its parasites as well? Not necessarily, says a team of UC Santa Barbara scientists.  

Tiny DNA Pyramids Enter Bacteria Easily and Deliver a Deadly Payload

July 9, 2014 11:53 am | News | Comments

Bacterial infections usually announce themselves with pain and fever but often can be defeated with antibiotics—and then there are those that are sneaky and hard to beat. Now, scientists have built a new weapon against such pathogens in the form of tiny DNA pyramids. Their study found the nanopyramids can flag bacteria and kill more of them than medicine alone.

Obesity Can Cut Up to 14 Years from Life Expectancy

July 9, 2014 11:09 am | News | Comments

Adults with extreme obesity have increased risks of dying at a young age from cancer and many other causes including heart disease, stroke, diabetes, and kidney and liver diseases, according to results of a new analysis.         

Cinnamon Could Halt Progression of Parkinson’s

July 9, 2014 10:26 am | News | Comments

Neurological scientists have found that using cinnamon, a common food spice and flavoring material, can reverse the biomechanical, cellular and anatomical changes that occur in the brains of mice with Parkinson’s disease (PD).       

Forgotten Vials of Smallpox Found in Storage Room

July 9, 2014 8:30 am | by Mike Stobbe, AP Medical Writer | News | Comments

A government scientist cleaning out an old storage room at a research center near Washington made a startling discovery last week- decades-old vials of smallpox packed away and forgotten in a cardboard box.             

AIDS Research Team Loses $1.38M Grant

July 9, 2014 8:30 am | by David Pitt | News | Comments

An AIDS research team at Iowa State University will not get the final $1.38 million payment of a National Institutes of Health five-year grant after a team member admitted last year to faking research results.            

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