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Next-generation GMOs: Pink Pineapples and Purple Tomatoes

April 1, 2015 9:54 am | by Mary Clare Jalonick, Associated Press | News | Comments

Cancer-fighting pink pineapples, heart-healthy purple tomatoes and less fatty vegetable oils may someday be on grocery shelves alongside more traditional products.

3-D Print Technology Provides 'Robohand' to 7-Year-Old Girl

April 1, 2015 9:46 am | by John Rogers, Associated Press | News | Comments

Seven-year-old Faith Lennox never thought much about putting a prosthetic limb where her missing left hand had once been.

3-D Human Skin Maps Aid Study of Relationships Between Molecules, Microbes and Environment

March 31, 2015 4:39 pm | by University of Calif, San Diego | News | Comments

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences used information collected from hundreds of skin swabs to produce three-dimensional maps of molecular and microbial variations across the body. 

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Clues into Cognitive Dysfunction in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

March 31, 2015 4:33 pm | by Columbia University | News | Comments

Scientists at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health have identified a unique pattern of immune molecules in the cerebrospinal fluid of people with myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS) that provides insights into the basis for cognitive dysfunction.

Premature Aging of Stem Cell Telomeres Linked to Emphysema

March 31, 2015 4:03 pm | by Johns Hopkins | News | Comments

Lung diseases like emphysema and pulmonary fibrosis are common among people with malfunctioning telomeres, the "caps" or ends of chromosomes. Now, researchers from Johns Hopkins say they have discovered what goes wrong and why.

Medieval Remedy Found to be Highly Effective Against MRSA

March 31, 2015 3:52 pm | by Stephanie Guzowski, Editor | News | Comments

British researchers recently found that a thousand-year-old Anglo-Saxon treatment for eye infections works as an antibiotic against MRSA. MRSA kills more than 5,000 people each year in the U.S. Read more...

Blood-Based Biomarkers could Enable Accurate TB tests for Diagnosis

March 30, 2015 4:57 pm | News | Comments

Researchers have identified blood-based biomarkers in patients with active tuberculosis (ATB) that could lead to new blood-based diagnostics and tools for monitoring treatment response and cure.

MRI based on Sugar Molecule Can Tell Cancerous from Noncancerous Cells

March 30, 2015 4:51 pm | by Johns Hopkins University | News | Comments

Imaging tests like mammograms or CT scans can detect tumors, but figuring out whether a growth is or isn’t cancer usually requires a biopsy to study cells directly.

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Colleges Getting Out of Health Insurance Business

March 30, 2015 4:45 pm | by Donna Gordon Blankinship, Associated Prss | News | Comments

​The federal health care overhaul is leading some colleges and universities to get out of the health insurance business.

Low Vitamin D Linked to Worse Prognosis in Type of Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

March 30, 2015 4:41 pm | by University of Rochester | News | Comments

A new study found that people with lower vitamin D levels prior to treatment for follicular lymphoma succumb to the disease or face relapse earlier than patients with sufficient vitamin D levels in their blood.

Body’s Good Fat Tissue Communicates With Brain Through Sensory Nerves

March 27, 2015 3:50 pm | by Georgia State University | News | Comments

Brown fat tissue, the body’s “good fat,” communicates with the brain through sensory nerves, possibly sharing information that is important for fighting human obesity, such as how much fat we have and how much fat we’ve lost.

Disrupted Biological Clock Linked to Alzheimer's

March 27, 2015 3:21 pm | by Oregon State University | News | Comments

New research has identified some of the processes by which molecules associated with neurological diseases can disrupt the biological clock, interfere with sleep and activity patterns, and set the stage for a spiral of health concerns that can include a decreased lifespan and Alzheimer’s disease.

Stanford Professor Receives $1M Stem Cell Grant for 'Bubble Boy' Disease

March 27, 2015 3:20 pm | by Stanford Medicine | News | Comments

With this award, Stanford has received a total of around $297 million from CIRM.

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HIV Can Lodge Quickly in Brain After Infection

March 27, 2015 3:15 pm | by Bill Hathaway, Yale University | News | Comments

HIV can establish itself in the brain as soon as four months after initial infection.

The Brain in the Supermarket

March 27, 2015 3:11 pm | by Peter Dizikes, MIT | News | Comments

Researchers suggest that your brain is making a simpler calculation when you shop.

Researchers Help Create 'Gold Standard' Method for Measuring Alzheimer's Disease

March 27, 2015 10:42 am | by Mark Wheeler, UCLA | News | Comments

A team of researchers has validated the first standardized protocol for measuring one of the earliest signs of Alzheimer’s disease.

Report: Diversity of New England Plant Life is Threatened

March 27, 2015 10:42 am | by Bob Salsberg, Associated Press | News | Comments

The report studied more than 3,500 known plant species and determined that 22 percent are considered rare, in decline, endangered or possibly extinct.

Genetic Mutation Explains Why, in Rare Cases, Flu Can Kill

March 27, 2015 10:39 am | by Rockefeller University | News | Comments

Nobody likes getting the flu, but for some people, fluids and rest aren’t enough. A small number of children who catch the influenza virus fall so ill they end up in the hospital — perhaps needing ventilators to breathe — even while their family and friends recover easily. New research helps explain why: a rare genetic mutation.

Two Exotic Termites Find Love in Florida

March 27, 2015 10:34 am | by Jennifer Kay, Associated Press | News | Comments

Two particularly hungry, exotic termite species apparently have found love halfway around the world and, as with so many other Florida hook-ups, the results are disturbing.

MRI Based on Sugar Molecule Tells Cancerous From Noncancerous Cells

March 27, 2015 9:48 am | by Johns Hopkins University | News | Comments

Results of a study suggest that MRI could one day make biopsies more effective or even replace them altogether by noninvasively detecting telltale sugar molecules shed by the outer membranes of cancerous cells.

Study Announces Durable Ebola Vaccine

March 26, 2015 10:40 am | by Andrew Gould, University of Plymouth | News | Comments

A new study shows the durability of a novel CMV based Ebola virus vaccine strategy that may eventually have the potential to reduce ebolavirus infection in wild African ape species. 

Common Bacteria on Verge of Becoming Antibiotic Resistant Superbugs

March 26, 2015 10:20 am | by Michael C. Purdy, Washington University in St. Louis | News | Comments

Antibiotic resistance is poised to spread globally among bacteria frequently implicated in respiratory and urinary infections in hospital settings, according to new research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.

Czechs Deploy Wild Horses from Britain to Save Biodiversity

March 25, 2015 2:37 pm | by Karel Janicek, Associated Press | News | Comments

A herd of 14 wild mares from Britain's Exmoor National Park were moved in January to the former Milovice military base, 35 kilometers (22 miles) northeast of Prague, the Czech capital.

Researchers Find Fossil of 'Super Salamander' Species

March 25, 2015 2:25 pm | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

The species grew up to two meters (six feet) in length and lived in lakes and rivers.

Why Some HPV Infections Go Away and Others Become Cancer

March 25, 2015 11:05 am | by Duke University | News | Comments

Immune system response isn't as crucial as activity of the infected cells themselves.

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