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President Obama Announces Precision Medicine Initiative

January 22, 2015 12:32 pm | by Ryan Bushey, Associate Editor | Articles | Comments

The President briefly mentioned the project during the State of The Union earlier this week.                            

Building on Biocontainment

January 22, 2015 10:56 am | by Harvard Univ. | News | Comments

The creation of genetically modified and entirely synthetic organisms continues to generate excitement as well as worry.                                                                   

New Govt Standards Target Pathogens in Poultry Products

January 22, 2015 10:41 am | by Mary Clare Jalonick, Associated Press | News | Comments

Standards proposed by the Agriculture Department aim to reduce rates of salmonella and campylobacter, another pathogen that can cause symptoms similar to salmonella, in chicken parts, ground chicken and ground turkey. The standards would be voluntary but designed to pressure companies to take steps to reduce contamination.

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Moving Closer to a Personalized Treatment Solution for Intellectual Disability

January 22, 2015 10:36 am | by Scripps Research Institute | News | Comments

Scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have produced an approach that protects animal models against a type of genetic disruption that causes intellectual disability, including serious memory impairments and altered anxiety levels.

Lysosome Dysfunction Linked to Infant Failure to Thrive

January 22, 2015 10:31 am | by Northwestern Medicine | News | Comments

Neonatal intestinal disorders that prevent infants from getting the nutrients they need may be caused by defects in the lysosomal system that occur before weaning, according to a new Northwestern Medicine study.                        

“Sugar-Coated” Pill Helps The Medicine Go Down

January 22, 2015 10:22 am | by Cambridge Univ. | News | Comments

Cambridge scientists have discovered a solution for controlling one of the world’s biggest environmental and ecological pests – the zebra mussel.                                                                         

Disney Parks-Linked Measles Outbreak Grows to 70 Cases

January 22, 2015 10:05 am | by Alicia Chang, Associated Press | News | Comments

Seventy people have been infected in a measles outbreak that led California public health officials to urge those who haven't been vaccinated against the disease, including children too young to be immunized, should avoid Disney parks where the spread originated.

Government Healthcare Website Quietly Sharing Personal Data

January 21, 2015 9:08 am | by Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar and Jack Gillum - Associated Press | News | Comments

The government's health insurance website is quietly sending consumers' personal data to private companies that specialize in advertising and analyzing Internet data for performance and marketing.           

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Blueberries, Avocados and Cocoa Beans May Keep Cardiologists at Bay

January 20, 2015 5:21 pm | by Bioscience Technology Staff | Articles | Comments

Times have changed. It used to be that an apple a day kept the doctor away. But three recent studies indicate this mantra could be changed to “a blueberry- avocado-cocoa-bean-smoothie a day” keeps the doctor away—if the doctor is a cardiologist.

Mysterious Goo Blamed in San Francisco Bay Area Bird Deaths

January 20, 2015 3:44 pm | by Kristin J. Bender - Associated Press | News | Comments

The death of 100 birds in the San Francisco Bay Area has baffled wildlife officials who say the feathers of the birds were coated with a mysterious substance that looks and feels like rubber cement.           

New Fibers Can Deliver Many Simultaneous Stimuli

January 20, 2015 3:22 pm | by David L. Chandler - MIT | News | Comments

The human brain’s complexity makes it extremely challenging to study.                                

Researchers Discover 'Idiosyncratic' Brain Patterns in Autism

January 20, 2015 10:42 am | by Carnegie Mellon | News | Comments

Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) has been studied for many years, but there are still many more questions than answers. For example, some research into the brain functions of individuals with autism spectrum have found a lack of synchronization ('connectivity') between different parts of the brain that normally work in tandem.

Insights Into a Rare Genetic Disease

January 20, 2015 10:36 am | by Riken Institute | News | Comments

The ability of proteins to function and interact with other molecules properly often depends on their three-dimensional configuration, which can be changed through the addition or subtraction of sugar chains.                                   

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Tumor-Causing Virus Widespread in Wild Turkey

January 20, 2015 10:33 am | by Mary Esch, Associated Press | News | Comments

Wildlife biologists tracking a tumor-causing virus first diagnosed in eastern wild turkeys five years ago have found the virus is far more widespread - but less deadly - than expected.                             

Eradicating Ebola: What Will It Take?

January 20, 2015 10:25 am | by Ryan Bushey, Associate Editor | Articles | Comments

These factors may not be enough to finally end the Ebola epidemic in West Africa.                              

Could Our Brains Instruct Our Bodies to Burn More Fat?

January 20, 2015 10:14 am | by Monash University | News | Comments

By uncovering the action of two naturally occurring hormones, scientists may have discovered a way to assist in the shedding of excess fat.                                                     

New Way to Model Sickle Cell Behavior

January 20, 2015 10:07 am | News | Comments

Patients with sickle cell disease often suffer from painful attacks known as vaso-occlusive crises, during which their sickle-shaped blood cells get stuck in tiny capillaries, depriving tissues of needed oxygen. Blood transfusions can sometimes prevent such attacks, but there are currently no good ways to predict when a vaso-occlusive crisis, which can last for several days, is imminent.

Questions, Answers About Sri Lanka Mystery Kidney Disease

January 20, 2015 9:38 am | by Margie Mason, AP Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

A mystery kidney disease is killing Sri Lankan farmers. The first cases surfaced some two decades ago in the country's North Central province, the main rice-producing area. Since then, the disease has killed up to an estimated 20,000 people on the Indian Ocean island nation.

Human Mode of Responding to HIV Vaccine Conserved from Monkeys

January 16, 2015 2:25 pm | by Duke Medicine | News | Comments

The antibody response from an HIV vaccine trial in Thailand was made possible by a genetic trait carried over in humans from an ancient ancestry with monkeys and apes.                

Vitamin D Protects Against Colorectal Cancer

January 16, 2015 2:03 pm | by Dana Farber Cancer Institute | News | Comments

A new study demonstrates that vitamin D can protect some people with colorectal cancer by perking up the immune system’s vigilance against tumor cells.                   

Measles Pops Up in Outbreak Linked to Disney Parks

January 16, 2015 1:57 pm | by Alicia Chang - AP Science Writer | News | Comments

The highly contagious respiratory illness was declared eliminated in the U.S. in 2000, but health officials have seen a surge of measles infections in the country in recent years.              

Sampling Finds More Asian Carp DNA Near Lake Michigan

January 16, 2015 1:52 pm | by Associated Press | News | Comments

A federal report says genetic markers of Asian carp are still showing up in Chicago-area waterways.                           

Harvard Launches Department of Biomedical Informatics

January 16, 2015 1:49 pm | by Harvard Medical School | News | Comments

The focus of this department is to study the convergence of health and data.                               

Scientists Find How Many Cancers May Evade Treatment

January 16, 2015 10:54 am | by University of Wisconsin-Madison | News | Comments

The drugs were designed to keep cancer cells at bay by preventing their growth, survival and spread. Yet, after clinical trials, they left scientists scratching their heads and drug developers watching their investments succumb to cancer’s latest triumph.

Tracking Physical Activity and Recovery from Spine Surgery

January 16, 2015 10:39 am | by Nora Dunne, Northwestern Medicine | News | Comments

When am I going to recover? It’s a common question from patients, yet a difficult one for physicians to answer. In an effort to better predict recovery over time for patients who undergo spine surgery, Northwestern Medicine investigators are monitoring physical activity using Fitbit trackers in an ongoing study.

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