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Genetic Flaw May Hold Key to Deadly Brain Tumor

April 7, 2014 1:41 pm | News | Comments

Scientists may have discovered a new way to treat a type of childhood brain tumor that has proved incurable up until now, according to a recent study.                             

Scientists Generate 3-D Structure of Malaria Parasite Genome

April 7, 2014 1:21 pm | News | Comments

Researchers have generated a 3-D model of the human malaria parasite genome at three different stages in the parasite’s life cycle— the first time such 3-D architecture has been generated during the progression of the life cycle of a parasite.  

Caffeine Can Target Tau Deposits in Alzheimer's

April 7, 2014 12:33 pm | News | Comments

A research team was able to demonstrate for the first time that caffeine has a positive effect on tau deposits in Alzheimer's disease. Tau deposits, along with beta-amyloid plaques, are among the characteristic features of Alzheimer's disease. 

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Messenger of Pain Identified

April 7, 2014 12:10 pm | News | Comments

In their pursuit of understanding how pain works at the molecular level, a research team has found a new function for MicroRNAs, short stretches of genetic material that signal genes to turn on or off.               

Experts Decode Germs' DNA to Fight Food Poisoning

April 6, 2014 8:18 am | by Lauran Neergaard - AP Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

Chances are you've heard of mapping genes to diagnose rare diseases, predict your risk of cancer and tell your ancestry. But to uncover food poisonings? The nation's disease detectives are beginning a program to try to outsmart outbreaks by routinely decoding the DNA of potentially deadly bacteria and viruses.

'Unzipping' Poplars' Biofuel Potential

April 4, 2014 2:47 pm | News | Comments

What began 20 years ago as an innovation to improve paper industry processes and dairy forage digestibility may now open the door to a much more energy- and cost-efficient way to convert biomass into fuel. New research focuses on enhancing poplar trees so they can break down easier and thus improving their viability as a biofuel.

Flipping the Switch on Scleroderma

April 4, 2014 1:58 pm | News | Comments

Scleroderma is a rare and often fatal disease, causing the thickening of tissue, which currently lacks a cure and any effective treatments. A group of researchers, including a Michigan State University professor, is looking to change that. Neubig, along with several of his colleagues from the University of Michigan, have identified the core signaling pathway that activates the disease and the chemical compounds that can turn it off.

A Brain Region for Resisting Alcohol's Allure

April 3, 2014 1:14 pm | News | Comments

University of Utah neuroscientists report that when a region of the brain called the lateral habenula is chronically inactivated in rats, they repeatedly drink to excess and are less able to learn from the experience. The study has implications for understanding behaviors that drive alcohol addiction.

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Watermelon Could Lower Blood Pressure

April 3, 2014 12:00 pm | News | Comments

Be sure to pick up a watermelon—or two—at your local grocery store. It could save your life. A new study found that watermelon could significantly reduce blood pressure in overweight individuals both at rest and while under stress.

Key Chocolate Ingredients Could Help Prevent Obesity, Diabetes

April 2, 2014 1:55 pm | News | Comments

Improved thinking. Decreased appetite. Lowered blood pressure. The potential health benefits of dark chocolate keep piling up, and scientists are now homing in on what ingredients in chocolate might help prevent obesity, as well as type-2 diabetes. They found that one particular type of antioxidant in cocoa prevented laboratory mice from gaining excess weight and lowered their blood sugar levels.

FDA OKs 1st Hay Fever Allergy Immunotherapy Tablet

April 2, 2014 12:20 pm | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved the first tablet for gradually reducing hay fever allergy symptoms, an alternative to uncomfortable allergy-desensitizing shots. Oralair, a tablet that dissolves quickly under the tongue, is approved for patients aged 10 through 65. It's to be...

Using Light-Heated Water to Deliver Drugs

April 1, 2014 2:25 pm | News | Comments

Researchers from the University of California, San Diego Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, in collaboration with materials scientists, engineers and neurobiologists, have discovered a new mechanism for using light to activate drug-delivering nanoparticles and other targeted therapeutic substances inside the body.

Study Looks at Why Vitamin D Deficiency Diagnoses Surged

April 1, 2014 1:55 pm | News | Comments

New research from Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center suggests that physicians are ordering vitamin D deficiency screening tests for preventive care purposes rather than after patients develop conditions caused by decreased bone density.

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New Screening Tool to Diagnose Common Sleep Problem in Children

April 1, 2014 1:16 pm | News | Comments

Clinical investigators at the Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario (CHEO) have developed a new screening tool to help diagnose obstructive sleep apnea in children. Evidence suggests that adults with a large neck circumference are more likely to develop obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), especially males. As neck circumference varies by age and sex, there have been no reference ranges to diagnose pediatric OSA up until now.

Tamiflu-resistant Influenza: Parsing the Genome for the Culprits

March 31, 2014 2:43 pm | News | Comments

It doesn’t take long for the flu virus to outsmart Tamiflu. EPFL scientists have developed a tool that reveals the mutations that make the virus resistant, and they have identified new mutations that may render ineffective one of the few treatments currently available on the market.

Relaxed Blood Pressure Guidelines Cut Millions from Needing Medication

March 31, 2014 2:20 pm | News | Comments

New guidelines that ease the recommended blood pressure could result in 5.8 million U.S. adults no longer needing hypertension medication. The findings are the first peer-reviewed analysis to quantify the impact of guidelines announced in February by the Eighth Joint National Committee. In a divisive move, the committee relaxed the blood pressure goal in adults 60 years and older to 150/90, instead of the previous goal of 140/90.

Strong Link Between Obesity and 'Carb breakdown' Gene

March 31, 2014 1:51 pm | News | Comments

Researchers at King’s College London and Imperial College London have discovered that people with fewer copies of a gene coding for a carb-digesting enzyme may be at higher risk of obesity. The findings suggest that dietary advice may need to be more tailored to an individual’s digestive system, based on whether they have the genetic predisposition and necessary enzymes to digest different foods.

Natural Plant Compounds May Assist Chemotherapy

March 27, 2014 2:06 pm | News | Comments

Scientists at Plant & Food Research, working together with researchers at The University of Auckland and the National Cancer Institute of The Netherlands, have discovered specific plant compounds able to inhibit transport mechanisms in the body that select what compounds are absorbed into the body,and eventually into cells. These same transport mechanisms are known to interfere with cancer chemotherapy treatment.

Brain Degeneration in Huntington’s Caused by Amino Acid Deficiency

March 27, 2014 12:58 pm | News | Comments

Neuroscientists report they have identified what they believe is the cause of the vast disintegration of a part of the brain called the corpus striatum in rodents and people with Huntington’s disease: loss of the ability to make the amino acid cysteine.

Genetics Explain Why Infections Trigger Rheumatoid Arthritis

March 27, 2014 12:40 pm | News | Comments

A team of researchers believe their findings could have important implications for the way that rheumatoid arthritis is diagnosed and treated. They say that more accurate clinical testing is now needed to better identify rheumatoid arthritis and to prevent it being misdiagnosed.

Heart Responds Differently to Exercise in Men, Women

March 27, 2014 12:20 pm | News | Comments

The formula for peak exercise heart rate that doctors have used for decades in tests to diagnose heart conditions may be flawed because it does not account for differences between men and women, new research says.            

Cholesterol Levels Vary by Season, Worsen in Colder Months

March 27, 2014 12:15 pm | News | Comments

Cholesterol levels fluctuate based on the time of year with more unfavorable lipid profiles seen in the colder months, a trend that may be driven by related behavior changes, according to new research.               

Autism Linked to Flawed Prenatal Brain Growth

March 27, 2014 11:46 am | by Lindsey Tanner - AP Medical Writer | Videos | Comments

A small study that examined brains from children who died found abnormal patterns of cell growth in autistic children. The research bolsters evidence that something before birth might cause autism, at least in some cases.         

Scientists Discover Bacterial Resistance to Improve Biofuel Production

March 26, 2014 1:59 pm | News | Comments

Resistance is not futile when it comes to a new method to more efficiently convert biomass to biofuels. New research by scientists from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in conjunction with the Joint BioEnergy Institute (JBEI) suggests that a type of bacterial resistance may provide more efficient production of biofuels.

Peaches Inhibit Breast Cancer Metastasis in Mice

March 26, 2014 9:54 am | News | Comments

Lab tests at Texas A&M AgriLife Research have shown that treatments with peach extract inhibit breast cancer metastasis in mice. AgriLife Research scientists say that the mixture of phenolic compounds present in the peach extract are responsible for the inhibition of metastasis, according to the study.

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