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Africa Stems Ebola via Border Closings, Luck

October 17, 2014 7:15 am | by Tom Odula and Lynsey Chutel - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

Health officials battling the Ebola outbreak that has killed more than 4,500 people in West Africa have managed to limit its spread on the continent to five countries - and two of them appear to have snuffed out the disease.       

Repair Process Suggests Potential Heart Attack Treatment Strategy

October 16, 2014 2:47 pm | News | Comments

Researchers have discovered that some scar-forming cells in the heart, known as fibroblasts, have the ability to become endothelial cells— the cells that form blood vessels. The finding could point the way toward a new strategy for treating people who have suffered a heart attack

Weight Gain Study Suggests Polyunsaturated Oil Healthier Option

October 16, 2014 2:33 pm | News | Comments

Short-term modest weight gains in healthy, normal weight young adults was associated with more bad cholesterol levels in those who ate muffins cooked using saturated oil. However, individuals in the same study who ate muffins made with polyunsaturated oils had improved blood cholesterol profiles, according to a new study. 

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Explaining More About Airway Closure During Asthma Attacks

October 16, 2014 2:28 pm | News | Comments

In acute asthma, various triggers, including viral illnesses and aeroallergens, can cause acute narrowing of the airways leading to a life-threatening respiratory crisis and sometimes death. Researchers have identified a novel factor that puts the brakes on airway smooth-muscle contraction relevant to asthma.

Brain’s Compass Relies on Geometric Relationships

October 16, 2014 2:24 pm | Videos | Comments

The brain has a complex system for keeping track of which direction you are facing as you move about; remembering how to get from one place to another would otherwise be impossible. Researchers have now shown how the brain anchors this mental compass.

Ebola Comes to Last Safe District in Sierra Leone

October 16, 2014 12:26 pm | by Clarence Roy-macaulay - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

The deadly Ebola virus has infected two people in what was the last untouched district in Sierra Leone, the government said Thursday, a setback in efforts to stop the spread of the disease in one of the hardest-hit countries.       

Embryonic Stem Cells in Trial for Diabetes

October 16, 2014 11:44 am | by Cynthia Fox, Science Writer | Articles | Comments

As San Diego’s ViaCyte was in the midst of launching the first FDA-approved embryonic stem (ES) cell clinical trial for diabetics last week, Boston’s Harvard University reported that cells made from ES cells “cured” diabetic mice.     

Existing Protocols Might Not be Enough for Ebola

October 16, 2014 10:27 am | by Martha Mendoza - AP National Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

As Thomas Eric Duncan's health deteriorated, nurses Amber Joy Vinson and Nina Pham were at the Ebola patient's side. They wore protective gear as they inserted catheters, drew blood and dealt with his body fluids. Still, the two somehow contracted Ebola from the dying man.

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Nurses in Safety Gear Got Ebola, Why Wouldn't You?

October 16, 2014 10:26 am | by Connie Cass - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

How come nurses wearing protective gear can catch Ebola from a patient, but health officials keep saying you almost certainly won't get it from someone sitting next to you on a plane?                    

Copper May Be Prostate Cancer’s Fatal Flaw

October 15, 2014 3:13 pm | News | Comments

Researchers have found a way to kill prostate cancer cells by delivering a trove of copper along with a drug that selectively destroys the diseased cells brimming with the mineral, leaving non-cancer cells healthy.           

Effects of High-risk Parkinson’s Mutation Are Reversible

October 15, 2014 3:08 pm | News | Comments

Researchers have found vital new evidence on how to target and reverse the effects caused by one of the most common genetic causes of Parkinson’s.                             

Early Detection Window When Pancreatic Cancer is in the Family

October 15, 2014 2:59 pm | News | Comments

Pancreatic cancer likely takes between 10 and 20 years to develop, providing the potential for a very “broad window” of intervention if detected early, which may be possible for people who inherit a predisposition, say researchers.     

Obesity Accelerates Liver Aging

October 15, 2014 2:52 pm | News | Comments

Using a recently developed biomarker of aging known as an epigenetic clock, researchers have found for the first time that obesity greatly accelerates aging of the liver.                       

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Tiny, Sound-Powered Chip May Serve as Medical Device

October 15, 2014 2:43 pm | News | Comments

Using ultrasound to deliver power wirelessly, researchers are working on a new generation of medical devices that would be planted deep inside the body to monitor illness, deliver therapies and relieve pain.             

New Test Bumps Up Enterovirus Diagnoses

October 15, 2014 1:24 pm | by Mike Stobbe - AP Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

For more than two months, health officials have been struggling to understand the size of a national wave of severe respiratory illnesses caused by an unusual virus. This week, they expect the wave to start looking a whole lot bigger.     

Q&A: How Plasma Transfusions, Antibodies Fight Ebola

October 15, 2014 1:19 pm | by Marilynn Marchione - AP Chief Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

A Dallas nurse being treated for Ebola has received a plasma transfusion from a doctor who beat his own infection with the deadly virus after getting a similar treatment. The reason: Antibodies in the blood of a survivor may help a patient fight off the germ.

2nd Dallas Nurse Tests Positive for Ebola

October 15, 2014 12:58 pm | by Emily Schmall and Nomaan Merchant - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

The second health care worker diagnosed with Ebola in Texas is a 29-year-old nurse who treated the Liberian man who died of the disease in a Dallas hospital.                           

Reversing Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis

October 14, 2014 2:42 pm | by Cynthia Fox, Science Writer | Articles | Comments

Lethal fibrosis in lungs of mice with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) can be reversed, say researchers. No drug on the market can do this. But the crew pulled it off, in mice, by temporarily restoring (a mimic of) one of the body’s own anti-fibrosis agents, sharply reduced in IPF: microRNA-29.

Ebola Death Rate Rises to 70%

October 14, 2014 1:03 pm | by Maria Cheng - AP Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

West Africa could face up to 10,000 new Ebola cases a week within two months, the World Health Organization warned Tuesday, adding that the death rate in the current outbreak has risen to 70 percent.               

Exercise Can Improve Memory in People Over 60

October 14, 2014 12:53 pm | News | Comments

A new study shows that physical activity can improve memory performance in older people through increasing volume and blood flow in an area of the brain called hippocampus.                       

Damage to Brain ‘Hubs’ Causes Extensive Impairment

October 14, 2014 12:41 pm | News | Comments

Injuries to six brain areas are much more devastating to patients’ abilities to think and adapt to everyday challenges than damage to other parts of the brain, scientists have learned.                    

ALS Progression Linked to Increased Protein Instability

October 14, 2014 12:28 pm | News | Comments

A new study suggests a cause of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease. The study provides evidence that those proteins linked to more severe forms of the disease are less stable structurally and more prone to form clusters or aggregates.

Stress May be Harder on Women’s Hearts than Men’s

October 14, 2014 12:20 pm | News | Comments

Researchers have known for decades that stress contributes to heart disease. But a new analysis shows mental stress may tax women’s hearts more than men’s.                           

Cellular 'Snooze Button' Advances Cancer, Biofuel Research

October 14, 2014 11:48 am | News | Comments

The discovery of a cellular snooze button has allowed a team of scientists to potentially improve biofuel production and offer insight on the early stages of cancer.                         

Chemical from Broccoli Sprouts Promising Against Autism

October 14, 2014 11:41 am | News | Comments

Results of a small clinical trial suggest that a chemical derived from broccoli sprouts— and best known for claims that it can help prevent certain cancers— may ease classic behavioral symptoms in those with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs).   

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