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New Device Could Make Large Biological Circuits Practical

November 25, 2014 2:20 pm | News | Comments

A team of researchers has come up with a way of greatly reducing the unpredictability of biological circuits. The team introduced a device that could ultimately allow such circuits to behave nearly as predictably as their electronic counterparts.   

Merck, Iowa Firm Sign Ebola Vaccine Licensing Deal

November 24, 2014 1:58 pm | by Linda A. Johnson - AP Business Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

Merck & Co., a top creator and seller of vaccines, has joined the fight against Ebola...

Health Care M&A Leads Global Deal Surge

November 23, 2014 6:57 pm | by Linda A. Johnson and Steve Rothwell - AP Business Writers - Associated Press | News | Comments

In a big year for deal making, the health care industry is a standout. Large drugmakers are...

Streamline Your Sample Preparation

November 21, 2014 10:15 am | by Joanne Ratcliff, PhD, Communications Project Manager, Laboratory Weighing Group, Mettler-Toledo AG | Articles | Comments

Why do labs have such difficultly getting a handle on the source of OOS results? Part of...

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Don’t Open the Freezer Door: Stability vs. Efficiency in ULT Freezers

November 20, 2014 10:55 am | by Joe LaPorte, Director of Product Management, Panasonic Healthcare North America | Articles | Comments

One day, hopefully sooner rather than later, a truly energy-efficient, ultra-low-temperature (ULT) freezer will reach the market. Unfortunately, for now, no technology exists that provides significant gains in efficiency, without compromising unit stability.

Surrogate Sushi: Japan Biotech for Bluefin Tuna

November 20, 2014 2:57 am | by Elaine Kurtenbach - AP Business Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

Of all the overfished fish in the seas, luscious, fatty bluefin tuna are among the most threatened. Marine scientist Goro Yamazaki, who is known in this seaside community as "Young Mr. Fish," is working to ensure the species survives.     

3-D-Printed Human Liver Tissues Can Benefit Preclinical Testing

November 19, 2014 1:26 pm | News | Comments

The three-dimensional biology company Organovo Holdings Inc. announced the full commercial release of the exVive3D Human Liver Tissue for preclinical drug discovery testing.                      

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The Odd Ouster of Sanofi’s Former CEO

November 13, 2014 9:29 am | by Ryan Bushey, Associate Editor | Articles | Comments

Chris Viehbacher, the high-flying pharma executive, had his career with Sanofi derailed for a variety of surprising factors. Here's a look at the odd ouster of the former CEO.                    

Revolutionary New Microscope: Real-time Movies of Molecules

November 12, 2014 8:30 am | by Cynthia Fox, Science Writer | Articles | Comments

A new microscope, using a new form of the much-hailed light sheet-based fluorescence microscopy (LSFM), makes visible— via stunning movies— countless biological processes once deemed utterly invisible: sub-cellular activity.       

Bridging the Gap in Precision Medicine

November 10, 2014 2:22 pm | News | Comments

More than a decade after the completion of Human Genome Project, precision medicine has struggled with what it known as the "last mile." Despite major leaps in the field, the technical work needed to integrate genomic information into the day-to-day practice of medicine has lagged far behind.

Silicon Valley, Hollywood Elite to Honor Breakthroughs in Life Science

November 7, 2014 12:31 pm | by Ryan Bushey, Associate Editor | News | Comments

On Nov. 9, Hollywood’s A-list and Silicon Valley luminaries will gather for the Second Annual Breakthrough Prize ceremony. Prizes are given to notable laureates in three different fields: Fundamental Physics, Life Sciences and Mathematics.    

Benchmark Proposed for Better Replication of Stem Cell Development

November 4, 2014 1:33 pm | News | Comments

In a study that could provide the foundation for scientists to more precisely replicate natural stem cell development in an artificial environment, researchers have established a standard to assess how conditions used to procure stem cells in the lab compare to those found in a human embryo.

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Google Developing Pill to Detect Cancer

October 29, 2014 10:45 am | by Brandon Bailey - AP Technology Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

Google is working on a cancer-detecting pill in its latest effort to push the boundaries of technology. Still in the experimental stage, the pill is packed with tiny magnetic particles, which can travel through a patient's bloodstream, search for malignant cells and report their findings to a sensor on a wearable device.

Medical Pot Dilemma: Where to Get the First Seeds?

October 27, 2014 8:25 am | by Carla K. Johnson - AP Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

As more states legalize medical marijuana, there's one stage in the process nobody wants to talk about: the part where people still have to break the law.                            

Imaging and Analysis with Flying Colors: Part One

October 22, 2014 8:30 am | by Mark Clymer, Director of Marketing, Datacolor Inc. | Articles | Comments

Researchers are facing increasing demands from colleagues, peers and publishers for process documentation including adequate controls, and for extensive documentation of experimental parameters. Without such consideration, there would be little chance to repeat, or even validate, findings.

3 Win Chemistry Nobel for Super-zoom Microscopes

October 8, 2014 10:36 am | by Karl Ritter and Malin Rising – Associated Press – Associated Press | News | Comments

Two Americans and a German scientist won the Nobel Prize in chemistry Wednesday for finding ways to make microscopes more powerful than previously thought possible, allowing scientists to see how diseases develop inside the tiniest cells.   

Drug and Device Firms Paid $3.5B to Care Providers

September 30, 2014 2:02 pm | by Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

Striving to shine a light on potential ethical conflicts in medicine, the Obama administration is releasing data on drug company payments to tens of thousands of individual doctors.                    

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U.S. in Danger of Losing Biotechnology Edge, Experts Warn

September 5, 2014 1:45 pm | News | Comments

The United States is in danger of losing its biomedical edge to countries that are aggressively funding research into personalized medicine, according to a key message from the 21st Century Cures Roundtable at National Jewish Health.      

3-D-printed Organs for Transplant One Step Closer

August 20, 2014 11:43 am | News | Comments

Printing whole new organs for transplants sounds like something out of a sci-fi movie, but the real-life budding technology could one day make actual kidneys, livers, hearts and other organs for patients who desperately need them.     

Boeing Partners with South African Airways to Turn New Tobacco Plant into Jet Fuel

August 8, 2014 12:25 pm | News | Comments

Boeing, South African Airways (SAA) and SkyNRG announced they are collaborating to make sustainable aviation biofuel from a new type of tobacco plant. This initiative broadens cooperation between Boeing and SAA to develop renewable jet fuel in ways that support South Africa's goals for public health as well as economic and rural development.

Nasal Test Accurately Diagnoses Human Prion Disease

August 7, 2014 9:57 am | News | Comments

A nasal brush test can rapidly and accurately diagnose Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD), an incurable and ultimately fatal neurodegenerative disorder, according to a new study.                     

FDA to Start Regulating Lab-developed Tests

July 31, 2014 12:24 pm | by Matthew Perron - AP Health Writer - The Associated Press | News | Comments

The Food and Drug Administration says it will begin regulating laboratory-developed tests, a growing class of medical diagnostics that have never before been subject to federal oversight.                  

Got a Rash? iPad, Other Devices Might be the Cause

July 14, 2014 12:20 am | by Lindsey Tanner - AP Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

Unexplained rash? Check your iPad. It turns out the popular tablet computer may contain nickel, one of the most common allergy-inducing metals. Recent reports in medical journals detail nickel allergies from a variety of personal electronic devices, including laptops and cellphones.

Muscle-powered Bio-bots Walk on Command

July 2, 2014 10:00 am | News | Comments

A new generation of miniature biological robots is flexing its muscle. Engineers have developed a class of walking “bio-bots” powered by muscle cells and controlled with electrical pulses, giving researchers unprecedented command over their function.

Heart-shocking ‘Shirt’ Could Save Lives

June 3, 2014 1:46 pm | News | Comments

Biomedical engineering students have designed a lightweight, easy-to-conceal shirt-like garment to deliver life-saving shocks to patients experiencing serious heart problems. The students say their design improves upon a wearable defibrillator system that is already in use.

Engineer Invents Safe Way to Transfer Energy to Medical Chips in the Body

May 20, 2014 12:23 pm | Videos | Comments

A Stanford electrical engineer has invented a way to wirelessly transfer power deep inside the body and then use this power to run tiny electronic medical gadgets such as pacemakers, nerve stimulators or new sensors and devices yet to be developed.

Bulletproof Nuclei? Stem Cells Exhibit Unusual Absorption

April 21, 2014 12:39 pm | News | Comments

Stem cells demonstrate a bizarre property never before seen at a cellular level, according to a new study. The property– known as auxeticity– is one which may have application as wide-ranging as soundproofing, super-absorbent sponges and bulletproof vests.

Engineers Design ‘Living Materials’

March 24, 2014 1:51 pm | News | Comments

Inspired by natural materials such as bone—a matrix of minerals and other substances, including living cells—MIT engineers have coaxed bacterial cells to produce biofilms that can incorporate nonliving materials, such as gold nanoparticles and quantum dots.

'Icy' Technique Improves Robotic Kidney Transplants

January 22, 2014 8:30 am | News | Comments

A collaboration of surgeons successfully transplanted kidneys into 50 recipients using an innovative robot-assisted procedure in which the organ is cooled with sterile ice during the operation.                 

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