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Skin Cells Reprogrammed to Mimic Rare Disease

August 22, 2014 11:38 am | News | Comments

Stem cell biologists have found a way to reprogram a patient’s skin cells into cells that mimic and display many biological features of a rare genetic disorder called familial dysautonomia.                  

Autistic Children Have Extra Brain Synapses

August 22, 2014 11:23 am | Videos | Comments

Children and adolescents with autism have a surplus of synapses in the brain, and this excess is...

8 Questions About the Recovered U.S. Ebola Patients

August 22, 2014 8:30 am | by Mike Stobbe - AP Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

Two American aid workers have recovered from Ebola and left an Atlanta hospital, after weeks of...

Combining Vaccines Boosts Polio Immunity

August 22, 2014 8:22 am | by Lauran Neergaard - AP Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

New research suggests a one-two punch could help battle polio in some of the world's most remote...

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‘The Pill’ Shrinks Ovaries, Cuts Egg Numbers

August 21, 2014 2:44 pm | by Cynthia Fox | Articles | Comments

The birth control pill significantly affects ovarian reserve— or the number of immature eggs in a woman’s ovaries— which can be a predictor of future fertility, according to a team in Denmark.                 

Severing Nerves May Shrink Stomach Cancers

August 21, 2014 11:07 am | News | Comments

Research shows that nerves may play a critical role in stomach cancer growth and that blocking nerve signals using surgery or Botox (onabotulinumtoxinA) could be an effective treatment for the disease.              

Scientists Discover Brain Area Responsible for Exercise Motivation

August 21, 2014 11:01 am | News | Comments

Scientists have discovered an area of the brain that could control a person’s motivation to exercise and participate in other rewarding activities, potentially leading to improved treatments for depression.             

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Missing Protein Restored in Patients with Muscular Dystrophy

August 21, 2014 10:52 am | News | Comments

For the first time, a research team has succeeded in restoring a missing repair protein in skeletal muscle of patients with muscular dystrophy.                               

‘Sleep Switch’ Neurons Diminish with Age, AD

August 21, 2014 10:40 am | News | Comments

As people grow older, they often have difficulty falling asleep and staying asleep, and tend to awaken too early in the morning. Now, a new study helps explain why sleep becomes more fragmented with age.              

TB Likely Spread with Help from Seals, Sea Lions

August 21, 2014 10:34 am | News | Comments

Scientists who study tuberculosis have long debated its origins. New research shows that tuberculosis likely spread from humans in Africa to seals and sea lions that brought the disease to South America and transmitted it to Native people there before Europeans landed on the continent.

Test Reliably Detects Inherited Immune Deficiency

August 21, 2014 10:24 am | News | Comments

A newborn screening test for severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) reliably identifies infants with this life-threatening inherited condition, leading to prompt treatment and high survival rates, according to a new study.        

Both American Ebola Patients Discharged from Hospital

August 21, 2014 8:22 am | by Jeff Martin and Katie Foody - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

After nearly three weeks of treatment, the two American aid workers who were infected with the deadly Ebola virus in Africa have been discharged from an Atlanta hospital, officials said Thursday.               

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BST This Week #9: Can Sweat Power Your Smartphone?

August 20, 2014 2:48 pm | Videos | Comments

On this episode of Bioscience Technology This Week, Christina Jakubowski highlights the possibility of using small sensors as biobatteries that can harvest power from sweat. Our second story covers a newly discovered plant “language."     

Enzyme Holds the Door for Influenza

August 20, 2014 12:47 pm | News | Comments

The enzyme phospholipase D (PLD) helps the influenza virus escape the immune response, and blocking it could lead to a new way to prevent the flu.                             

Type 1, Type 2 Diabetes Share Underlying Mechanism

August 20, 2014 12:36 pm | News | Comments

New work by scientists suggests that both major forms of diabetes, type 1 and type 2, are the result of the same mechanism - the formation of toxic clumps of a hormone called amylin.                   

Gene Predicts Breast Cancer Relapse, Response to Chemo

August 20, 2014 12:29 pm | News | Comments

Scientists have made it easier to predict both breast cancer relapses and responses to chemotherapy, through the identification of a unique gene, a new study shows.                         

Are Failing Bees a Warning Sign to Human Health?

August 20, 2014 12:14 pm | News | Comments

A researcher believes that the potential human health implications of bee colony collapse disorder extend beyond the drop in pollination to the impact on humans of long exposure to low-level poisons, like neonicotinoid pesticides.     

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Drug Candidate Blocks 'Chili-pepper Receptor'

August 20, 2014 11:53 am | News | Comments

 As anyone who has bitten into a chili pepper knows, its burning spiciness— though irresistible to some — is intolerable to others. Scientists exploring the chili pepper’s effect are using their findings to develop a new drug candidate for many kinds of pain.

3-D-printed Organs for Transplant One Step Closer

August 20, 2014 11:43 am | News | Comments

Printing whole new organs for transplants sounds like something out of a sci-fi movie, but the real-life budding technology could one day make actual kidneys, livers, hearts and other organs for patients who desperately need them.     

Physical Fitness Makes Kids' Brains Bigger

August 19, 2014 1:41 pm | News | Comments

A new study of 9- and 10-year-olds finds that those who are more aerobically fit have more fibrous and compact white-matter tracts in the brain than their peers who are less fit.                     

Engineering New Bone Growth

August 19, 2014 12:07 pm | News | Comments

Chemical engineers have devised a new implantable tissue scaffold coated with bone growth factors that are released slowly over a few weeks. When applied to bone injuries or defects, the scaffold induces the body to rapidly form new bone that looks and behaves just like the original tissue.

Ebola Has Killed More Than 1,200, WHO Says

August 19, 2014 6:19 am | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

The U.N. health agency says the Ebola outbreak in West Africa has now killed more than 1,200 people. The World Health Organization says the death toll has risen to 1,229 from among the 2,240 reported cases in Guinea, Liberia, Nigeria and Sierra Leone. 

Next-Generation Sequencing and the Transformation of Cancer Care

August 18, 2014 3:20 pm | by Darren Lee, Vice President, Marketing & Business Development, Nabsys | White Papers

NGS is revolutionizing the field of genome biology, with much faster data generation, increased accuracy, and a dramatic reduction of sequencing costs. Multiple genomes can now be sequenced in parallel by a single instrument in a matter of days. In the medical field, NGS is already having an impact in genetic screening and holds great potential in oncology, given the genetic aspects of cancerous disease.

Do Gut Bacteria Rule Our Minds?

August 18, 2014 12:46 pm | News | Comments

It sounds like science fiction, but it seems that bacteria within us– which outnumber our own cells about 100-fold– may very well be affecting both our cravings and moods to get us to eat what they want, and often are driving us toward obesity.  

Can Twitter Help Better Identify Foodborne Illness Cases?

August 18, 2014 12:33 pm | News | Comments

An estimated 55 million to 105 million people in the United States suffer from foodborne illnesses each year, according to the CDC, resulting in costs of $2 to $4 billion annually. What if Twitter could be used to track those cases and more quickly identify the source of the problem?

Antibiotics in Early Life May Alter Long-term Immunity

August 18, 2014 11:34 am | News | Comments

New research found that receiving antibiotic treatments early in life can increase susceptibility to specific diseases later on. The study helps scientists understand how different antibiotics affect good bacteria.        

Suspect Gene Corrupts Neural Connections

August 18, 2014 10:58 am | News | Comments

A genetic variation linked to schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and severe depression wreaks havoc on connections among neurons in the developing brain, a team of researchers reports.                    

Another Ebola Problem: Finding Its Natural Source

August 17, 2014 9:17 am | by Mike Stobbe and Marilynn Marchione - AP Medical Writers - Associated Press | News | Comments

A scary problem lurks beyond the frenzied efforts to keep people from spreading Ebola: No one knows exactly where the virus comes from or how to stop it from seeding new outbreaks.                    

Bioscience Technology This Week #8: Safe Nuts for Allergy Sufferers

August 15, 2014 12:43 pm | Videos | Comments

On this episode of Bioscience Technology This Week, Christina Jakubowski reports on the possibility of making nuts safer to eat for those with allergies. Our second story tackles important questions about which genes may drive antibiotic resistance. 

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