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The Lead

Newly-Found T Memory Stem Cells May Be Key to Gene Therapy

February 27, 2015 10:41 am | by Cynthia Fox, Science Writer | Articles | Comments

Genetically engineered T memory stem cells (Tscm) can last more than 12 years in patients’ bodies, and can continually generate appropriate T cell armies for them, says an innovative study looking at two historic clinical trials.     

Thinking of God Makes People Bigger Risk-Takers

February 27, 2015 10:14 am | by Association for Psychological Science | News | Comments

Reminders of God can make people more likely to seek out and take risks, according to research...

Million Man Study Examines Long-term Effects of Blocking Inflammation

February 27, 2015 10:07 am | by University of Cambridge | News | Comments

Inflammation - the body's response to damaging stimuli - may have a protective effect against...

Scientists Discover Beliefs Can be as Powerful as Nicotine

February 26, 2015 10:32 am | by Ashley WennersHerron, Virginia Tech | News | Comments

Study participants inhaled nicotine, yet they showed significantly different brain activity...

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A New Understanding of Alzheimer's

February 26, 2015 9:46 am | by Peter Reuell, Harvard Gazette | News | Comments

Findings point to role of natural selection in disease.                                  

Researchers Redefine Role of Brain's 'Hunger Circuit'

February 25, 2015 9:54 am | by Pete Farley, UCSF | News | Comments

Unexpected findings have implications for anti-obesity therapies.                                

How Brain Waves Guide Memory Formation

February 25, 2015 9:42 am | by Anne Trafton, MIT | News | Comments

Neurons hum at different frequencies to tell the brain which memories it should store.                             

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Skin Test May Shed New Light on Alzheimer's, Parkinson's Diseases

February 25, 2015 9:32 am | by American Adcademy of Neurology | News | Comments

The study showed that skin biopsies can be used to detect elevated levels of abnormal proteins found in the two diseases.                       

Scientists Report Bionic Hand Resconstruction in Three Austrian Men

February 25, 2015 9:20 am | by Maria Cheng, AP Medical Writer | News | Comments

Three Austrians have replaced injured hands with bionic ones that they can control using nerves and muscles transplanted into their arms from their legs.                              

Telemedicine Set to Bloom in 2015

February 24, 2015 1:39 pm | by Steve Boccone, Greybox Communications | Articles | Comments

New technologies will help the field of telemedicine drastically grow this year.                              

DNA Transcription Sheds Light on Cancer Pathogenesis

February 24, 2015 12:35 pm | by Nora Dunne, Northwestern University | News | Comments

Transcription, the process in which genetic information from DNA is copied into RNA to produce proteins, requires many pieces coming together.                    

Early Exposure to Peanuts Helps Prevent Allergies in Kids

February 24, 2015 12:25 pm | by Marilynn Marchione - AP Chief Medical Writer | News | Comments

For years, parents of babies who seem likely to develop a peanut allergy have gone to extremes to keep them away from peanut-based foods.                    

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Obesity Genes Identified by Worldwide Research Team

February 24, 2015 9:43 am | by Queensland University of Technology | News | Comments

A massive worldwide analysis of genetic data from almost 340,000 people around the world has brought understanding of the genetic basis of obesity a step closer.                

Study Shows Destroying Material That Cloaks Cancer Cells Could Benefit Patients

February 24, 2015 9:31 am | by Translational Genomics Research Institute | News | Comments

Like a stealth jet cloaks itself from radar, cancer cells cloak themselves within tumors by hiding behind a dense layer of cellular material known as stroma.                 

Challenges for Doctors Using Fitness Trackers, Apps

February 20, 2015 4:26 pm | by Anick Jesdanun, AP Tech Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

More hospitals and doctors are starting to use data from fitness trackers and health apps to help treat patients. But they are moving cautiously. The technology has a lot of potential, but there are key challenges to work out...

Cancer Risk Linked to DNA 'Wormholes'

February 19, 2015 11:59 am | by Institute of Cancer Research | News | Comments

Single-letter genetic variations within parts of the genome once dismissed as ‘junk DNA’ can increase cancer risk through 'wormhole-like' effects on far-off genes, new research shows.             

Disruption in Brain Signals Shed New Light on Melancholic Depression

February 19, 2015 11:54 am | by University of New South Wales | News | Comments

Researchers have identified a distinctive brain signature in people with melancholic depression, supporting calls for its classification as a unique mood disorder type.               

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Keeping Atherosclerosis in Check with Novel Targeted Nanomedicines

February 19, 2015 11:42 am | by Columbia University | News | Comments

Nanometer-sized “drones” that deliver a special type of healing molecule to fat deposits in arteries could become a new way to prevent heart attacks caused by atherosclerosis.              

Auditory Pain Pathway May Protect Against Hearing Loss

February 19, 2015 11:37 am | by Marla Paul, Northwestern University | News | Comments

Our hearing has a secret bodyguard: a newly discovered connection from the cochlea to the brain that warns of intense incoming noise that causes tissue damage and hearing loss.              

New Nanogel for Drug Delivery

February 19, 2015 11:31 am | by Anne Trafton, MIT | News | Comments

Scientists are interested in using gels to deliver drugs because they can be molded into specific shapes and designed to release their payload over a specified time period. However, current versions aren’t always practical because must be implanted surgically.

Think Again About Gender Gap in Science

February 18, 2015 11:55 am | by Northwestern Univ. | News | Comments

Scholars from diverse fields have long proposed that interlocking factors such as cognitive abilities, discrimination and interests may cause more women than men to leave the science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) pipeline after entering college. Now a new Northwestern University analysis has poked holes in the much referenced "leaky pipeline" metaphor.

Is Strenuous Running Really as Bad for Health as Lounging?

February 18, 2015 11:32 am | by Cynthia Fox, Science Writer | News | Comments

Running hard may be as bad for your longevity as being a couch potato, says a recent study—one that should be taken with a grain of salt (hold the butter), say some critics. The study, in a recent Journal of the American College of Cardiology, examined 5,048 healthy people enrolled in the Copenhagen City Heart Study. For 12 years, 1,098 healthy joggers and 413 healthy, but sedentary non-joggers were followed.

Broca's Area is the Brain's Scriptwriter, Shaping Speech

February 17, 2015 4:27 pm | by Johns Hopkins University | News | Comments

This new insight about Broca’s area, which is located in the frontal cortex above and behind the left eye, could ultimately benefit the treatment of language impairments due to stroke, epilepsy and brain injuries.        

Anti-Inflammatory Mechanism of Dieting, Fasting Revealed

February 17, 2015 4:22 pm | by Karen N. Peart, Yale News | News | Comments

Researchers have found that a compound produced by the body when dieting or fasting can block a part of the immune system involved in several inflammatory disorders such as type 2 diabetes, atherosclerosis, and Alzheimer’s disease.     

Mothers Can Pass Traits to Offspring Through Bacteria's DNA

February 17, 2015 4:14 pm | by Michael C. Purdy, Washington University in St. Louis | News | Comments

Bacteria are most familiar through their roles in harmful infections. But scientists have realized that such bacteria are only a tiny fraction of the bacterial communities that live in and on our bodies. Most bacteria are commensal, which means they do not cause harm and often confer benefits.

Iron May be a Factor in Dementia

February 17, 2015 4:09 pm | by Leigh Dayton, UTS | News | Comments

There is no way to spot Alzheimer's early, no effective treatment and no known cure.                             

Protein Clue to Sudden Cardiac Death

February 17, 2015 3:56 pm | by Oxford University | News | Comments

A protein has been shown to have a surprising role in regulating the 'glue' that holds heart cells together, a finding that may explain how a gene defect could cause sudden cardiac death.            

Health Groups Say AIDS No. 1 Killer of Adolescents in Africa

February 17, 2015 3:47 pm | by Tom Odula, Associated Press | News | Comments

Global health organizations said Tuesday that AIDS is now the leading cause of death for adolescents in Africa, and the second leading cause of death among adolescents globally.              

How Technology Can Block Our Creativity

February 17, 2015 2:21 pm | by Ryan Bushey, Associate Editor | Videos | Comments

The Atlantic's James Hamblin explores how our obsession with smartphones could stifle creative impulses.                              

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