Advertisement
Human Studies
Subscribe to Human Studies

The Lead

Apple's ResearchKit - The Real Impact on Clinical Trials

April 28, 2015 8:59 am | by Merrilyn Datta, Ph.D., President and General Manager, Definiens | Articles | Comments

ResearchKit is being touted as having immense implications for the future of clinical trials.

AAN 2015 Research Spotlight: A New Compound for Alzheimer’s

April 28, 2015 8:51 am | by Bevin Fletcher, Associate Editor | Articles | Comments

Neurologists from all over the world converged in Washington D.C. last week, with an estimated...

Some Progestins May Hike Cancer; Some Estrogens May Ward it Off

April 24, 2015 4:03 pm | by Cynthia Fox, Science Writer | Articles | Comments

A recent analysis of  long-term after-effects of a specific hormone replacement therapy (HRT)—...

Nerve Activity Stimulates Brain Tumor Growth

April 24, 2015 9:27 am | by Stanford University | News | Comments

New research shows that high-grade gliomas, the deadliest human brain tumors, increase their...

View Sample

FREE Email Newsletter

Pollution Shrinks Brains, Causes Silent Strokes

April 24, 2015 9:17 am | by Seth Augenstein, Digital Reporter | Articles | Comments

Air pollution can shrink brains, lead to cognitive problems and even cause silent stokes, according to new research published by Stroke a journal of the American Heart Association.

Technology Can Transfer Human Emotions to Your Palm Through Air, Say Scientists

April 23, 2015 9:22 am | by University of Sussex | News | Comments

Human emotion can be transferred by technology that stimulates different parts of the hand without making physical contact with your body, a study has shown.

Babies Feel Pain 'Like Adults'

April 23, 2015 9:00 am | by University of Oxford | News | Comments

The brains of babies 'light up' in a very similar way to adults when exposed to the same painful stimulus, a brain scanning study has discovered. It suggests that babies experience pain much like adults.

Advertisement

Listen to Your Heart: Why Your Brain May Give Away How Well You Know Yourself

April 22, 2015 11:11 am | by University of Cambridge | News | Comments

“Listen to your heart,” sang Swedish pop group Roxette in the late Eighties. But not everyone is able to tune into their heartbeat, according to an international team of researchers – and half of us under- or over-estimate our ability.

Two Studies Examine Diabetes Severity in Parkinson's, Sex Differences in Parkinson's Caregiving

April 22, 2015 11:02 am | by University of Pennsylvania | News | Comments

Findings reveal severe diabetes worsens Parkinson's symptoms.

Cirrhosis Deaths Drop 41 Percent from 2002 to 2012

April 22, 2015 10:43 am | by UNC | News | Comments

A new study has found dramatic improvements in the care of patients with cirrhosis and liver failure and recommends improved treatment strategies for patients with cirrhosis and concurrent bacterial infections.

DNA Abnormalities Found in Children with Chronic Kidney Disease

April 22, 2015 10:18 am | by Columbia University | News | Comments

Routine genetic screening of children with CKD could lead to earlier, more precise diagnoses.

Early Human Embryos Make Viral Proteins

April 20, 2015 4:30 pm | by Stanford University | News | Comments

Human embryos make viral proteins within days of fertilization.

Advertisement

As Subdural Hematomas Increase, so do Brain Growth Studies

April 17, 2015 2:47 pm | by Cynthia Fox, Science Writer | Articles | Comments

There will be 60,000 annual cases of chronic subdural hematoma (SDH) by 2030, making SDH the U.S.’s most common adult brain surgery disorder, says a new study by New York University (NYU) researchers.

Oldest Ever DNA Sample from Calcified Neanderthal Man

April 17, 2015 1:52 pm | by Sean Alloca, Editor, Forensic Magazine | Articles | Comments

Bones found in an Italian cave over two decades ago might have provided the oldest Neanderthal DNA ever tested.

Income and Brain Anatomy

April 17, 2015 9:52 am | by Anne Trafton, MIT | News | Comments

In middle-schoolers, neuroscientists find differences in brain structures where knowledge is stored.

Fitness Trackers Could Support MS Treatments: Study

April 16, 2015 3:13 pm | by Ryan Bushey, Associate Editor | Articles | Comments

The team of investigators will present their findings this week at the annual American Academy of Neurology meeting.

Scientists Use Brain Stimulation to Boost Creativity

April 16, 2015 10:17 am | by UNC | News | Comments

Using a weak electric current to alter a specific brain activity pattern, UNC School of Medicine researchers increased creativity in healthy adults. Now they’re testing the same experimental protocol to alleviate symptoms in people with depression.

Advertisement

Paternal Sperm May Hold Clues to Autism

April 16, 2015 9:49 am | by Johns Hopkins | News | Comments

Tags on DNA from fathers’ sperm linked to children’s autism symptoms.

Wearable Device Slows Deadly Brain Tumors

April 15, 2015 9:14 am | by University of Virginia | News | Comments

A wearable device that emits low-level electrical fields can slow the progression of glioblastoma, the deadliest form of brain cancer, and extend patients’ lifespans.

IBM Opens Up New Health Data Venture

April 15, 2015 9:01 am | by Ryan Bushey, Associate Editor | Articles | Comments

Apple, Johnson & Johnson, and Medtronic will be partners on this program.

Inside New York's Cryotherapy Lab

April 13, 2015 10:04 am | by Ryan Bushey, Associate Editor | Videos | Comments

This company is offering a peculiar treatment.

Study Deciphers the Noise in the Human Brain

April 10, 2015 9:16 am | by Bruce Goldman, Stanford University | News | Comments

Electrical recordings directly from the human brain show remarkable precision in the coordination of widely distributed regions involved in memory recall, at rest and during sleep.

A Patch for Peanut Allergies

April 9, 2015 11:13 am | by Bevin Fletcher, Associate Editor | Articles | Comments

French biopharmaceutical company DBV Technologies moves closer to bringing its peanut allergy patch to market, receiving Breakthrough Therapy Designation from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration as it prepares to launch its Phase 3 trial.

Distance Running May Be an Evolutionary ‘Signal’ for Desirable Male Genes

April 9, 2015 10:58 am | by University of Cambridge | News | Comments

New research shows that males with higher ‘reproductive potential’ are better distance runners. This may have been used by females as a reliable signal of high male genetic quality during our hunter-gatherer past, as good runners are more likely to have other traits of good hunters and providers, such as intelligence and generosity.

Don’t Blame Kids if They Do Not Enjoy School, Study Suggests

April 9, 2015 8:59 am | by Jeff Grabmeier, Ohio State University | News | Comments

When children are unmotivated at school, new research suggests their genes may be part of the equation.

Ocular Therapeutix Eye-Pain Implant Fails Crucial Clinical Study

April 9, 2015 8:39 am | by Ryan Bushey, Associate Editor | Articles | Comments

Investors did not seem pleased by these results.

Analyst: India to Lead Asia-Pacific Non-Vascular Stents Market Growth by 2021

April 7, 2015 2:59 pm | by Priya Radhakrishnan, Director of Medical Devices, GlobalData | Articles | Comments

The Asia-Pacific non-vascular stents market, consisting of urinary tract, pancreatic and biliary, enteral, and airway stents, will expand in value from $148.1 million in 2013 to $223.8 million by 2021.

New Genetic Clues Emerge on Origin of Hirschsprung's Disease

April 6, 2015 2:12 pm | by Johns Hopkins | News | Comments

Genetic studies in humans, zebrafish and mice have revealed how two different types of genetic variations team up to cause a rare condition called Hirschsprung’s disease.

New DNA Test Highly Accurate at Detecting Down Syndrome

April 6, 2015 9:37 am | by Columbia University | News | Comments

A test that detects fetal DNA in the mother’s bloodstream is more accurate than conventional screening at identifying Down syndrome (aka trisomy 21), finds a new study led by researchers at Columbia University Medical Center and UCSF.

X
You may login with either your assigned username or your e-mail address.
The password field is case sensitive.
Loading