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Think Again About Gender Gap in Science

February 18, 2015 11:55 am | by Northwestern Univ. | News | Comments

Scholars from diverse fields have long proposed that interlocking factors such as cognitive abilities, discrimination and interests may cause more women than men to leave the science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) pipeline after entering college. Now a new Northwestern University analysis has poked holes in the much referenced "leaky pipeline" metaphor.

Is Strenuous Running Really as Bad for Health as Lounging?

February 18, 2015 11:32 am | by Cynthia Fox, Science Writer | News | Comments

Running hard may be as bad for your longevity as being a couch potato, says a recent study—one that should be taken with a grain of salt (hold the butter), say some critics. The study, in a recent Journal of the American College of Cardiology, examined 5,048 healthy people enrolled in the Copenhagen City Heart Study. For 12 years, 1,098 healthy joggers and 413 healthy, but sedentary non-joggers were followed.

Broca's Area is the Brain's Scriptwriter, Shaping Speech

February 17, 2015 4:27 pm | by Johns Hopkins University | News | Comments

This new insight about Broca’s area, which is located in the frontal cortex above and behind the left eye, could ultimately benefit the treatment of language impairments due to stroke, epilepsy and brain injuries.        

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Anti-Inflammatory Mechanism of Dieting, Fasting Revealed

February 17, 2015 4:22 pm | by Karen N. Peart, Yale News | News | Comments

Researchers have found that a compound produced by the body when dieting or fasting can block a part of the immune system involved in several inflammatory disorders such as type 2 diabetes, atherosclerosis, and Alzheimer’s disease.     

Mothers Can Pass Traits to Offspring Through Bacteria's DNA

February 17, 2015 4:14 pm | by Michael C. Purdy, Washington University in St. Louis | News | Comments

Bacteria are most familiar through their roles in harmful infections. But scientists have realized that such bacteria are only a tiny fraction of the bacterial communities that live in and on our bodies. Most bacteria are commensal, which means they do not cause harm and often confer benefits.

Iron May be a Factor in Dementia

February 17, 2015 4:09 pm | by Leigh Dayton, UTS | News | Comments

There is no way to spot Alzheimer's early, no effective treatment and no known cure.                             

Protein Clue to Sudden Cardiac Death

February 17, 2015 3:56 pm | by Oxford University | News | Comments

A protein has been shown to have a surprising role in regulating the 'glue' that holds heart cells together, a finding that may explain how a gene defect could cause sudden cardiac death.            

Health Groups Say AIDS No. 1 Killer of Adolescents in Africa

February 17, 2015 3:47 pm | by Tom Odula, Associated Press | News | Comments

Global health organizations said Tuesday that AIDS is now the leading cause of death for adolescents in Africa, and the second leading cause of death among adolescents globally.              

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How Technology Can Block Our Creativity

February 17, 2015 2:21 pm | by Ryan Bushey, Associate Editor | Videos | Comments

The Atlantic's James Hamblin explores how our obsession with smartphones could stifle creative impulses.                              

Researchers Test Device to Help Deaf Children Detect Sounds

February 17, 2015 10:28 am | by Lauran Neergaard, AP Medical Writer | News | Comments

The device goes beyond cochlear implants that have brought hearing to many deaf children but that don't work for tots who lack their hearing nerve.                   

Molecular Inhibitor Breaks Cycle That Leads to Alzheimer's

February 17, 2015 10:15 am | by University of Cambridge | News | Comments

A molecule that can block the progress of Alzheimer’s disease at a crucial stage in its development has been identified by researchers in a new study, raising the prospect that more such molecules may now be found.        

Taking Technology from the Lab to the Patient

February 17, 2015 10:06 am | by Anne Trafton, MIT | News | Comments

A MIT researcher wants to bring advances in drug delivery and biomaterials to the clinic.                            

Researchers Discover Molecular Trigger of IBD

February 17, 2015 10:00 am | by Duke University | News | Comments

Cells lining the intestinal tract form a critical barrier, protecting our bodies from the billions of bacteria living in the gut.                      

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Gambling, Obsessive Compulsive Behaviors Linked

February 13, 2015 3:49 pm | by Bill Hathaway, Yale University | News | Comments

Problem gambling and obsessive-compulsive behaviors share genetic as well as behavioral links, according to a new study.                       

CDC: Nasty Flu Season has Peaked

February 13, 2015 3:41 pm | by Mike Stobbe, AP Medical Writer | News | Comments

This winter's nasty flu season has peaked and is clearly retreating, a new government report shows.                           

Aggressive Form of HIV Uncovered in Cuba

February 12, 2015 2:42 pm | by University of Leuven | News | Comments

Engaging in unprotected sex with multiple partners increases the risk of contracting multiple strains of HIV, the virus that causes AIDS. Once inside a host, these strains can recombine into a new variant of the virus.       

Microbes Prevent Malnutrition in Fruit Flies - Maybe Humans, too

February 12, 2015 2:33 pm | by The Scripps Research Institute | News | Comments

Microbes, small and ancient life forms, play a key role in maintaining life on Earth. As has often been pointed out, without microbes, we’d die—without us, most microbes would get along just fine.           

Study Ties More Deaths, Types of Disease, to Smoking

February 12, 2015 2:06 pm | by Marilynn Marchione, Associated Press | News | Comments

Breast cancer, prostate cancer, and even routine infections. A new report ties these and other maladies to smoking and said an additional 60,000 to 120,000 deaths each year in the United States are probably due to tobacco use.      

HPV Vaccination Not Linked to Riskier Sex

February 12, 2015 10:08 am | News | Comments

Receiving the human papillomavirus vaccine does not increase rates of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) in adolescent females. The vaccine, which can prevent cervical cancer in women, has had a low uptake, partly because of concerns about how it will affect adolescent sexual activity.

Brain Stents Show Big Promise for Certain Stroke Patients

February 12, 2015 9:53 am | by Associated Press | News | Comments

Stroke experts are reporting a major advance: Stents similar to the ones used to open clogged heart arteries also can be used to clear a blood clot in the brain, greatly lowering the risk a patient will end up disabled.

Isolated Systolic Hypertension Indicates Heart Disease Risk for Younger Adults

February 12, 2015 9:32 am | News | Comments

High systolic blood pressure – the top number in a blood pressure reading – has long been considered an indicator of cardiovascular disease risk for adults over 50. But now a new Northwestern Medicine study suggests that it’s also important for younger adults.

Common Biomarkers of Sleep Debt Found in Humans, Rats: Study

February 12, 2015 9:10 am | News | Comments

Stating that sleep is an essential biological process seems as obvious as saying that the sun rises every morning. Yet, researchers' understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of sleep loss is still in its earliest stages.

Grey Matter Loss from Smoking May be Reversible: Study

February 10, 2015 5:12 pm | News | Comments

Damage to the brain's outer layer caused by smoking may be reversible after quitting, but it could take years, a study said. Brain scans of 500 Scottish septuagenarians confirmed a link between smoking and an acceleration of age-related thinning of the cortex—the outer layer of grey matter, researchers reported.

Babies Identify Complex Social Situations

February 10, 2015 5:02 pm | by University of Missouri-Columbia | News | Comments

In the social world, people constantly gather information through visual cues that are used to evaluate others and interact. A new study from researchers at the University of Missouri determined that babies can make sense of complex social situations, and that they expect people to behave appropriately.     

Startup Uses Google Glass to Improve Patient-Physician Relationship

February 10, 2015 9:28 am | by Tracie White, Stanford Medical School | News | Comments

Firsthand experience working in hospitals and clinics helped inspire third-year Stanford medical student Pelu Tran to explore a potential career path in the world of high-tech startups.             

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