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Study Questions Need for Cutting Salt

August 13, 2014 5:18 pm | by Marilynn Marchione - AP Chief Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

A large international study questions the conventional wisdom that most people should cut back on salt, suggesting that the amount most folks consume is OK for heart health - and too little may be as bad as too much.         

Huntingtin Gene Crucial to Memory Development

August 13, 2014 11:50 am | News | Comments

It has been more than 20 years since scientists discovered that mutations in the gene huntingtin cause the devastating progressive neurological condition Huntington’s disease. Surprisingly little, however, has been known about the gene’s role in normal brain activity. Now, new research shows it plays a critical role in long-term memory.

‘Shape-Shifting’ Material Could Help Reconstruct Faces

August 13, 2014 11:16 am | News | Comments

Researchers are reporting that they have developed a “self-fitting” material that expands with warm salt water to precisely fill bone defects that occur as a result of injury, birth defect or surgery to remove a tumor.          

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Prostate Cancer Diagnosis Improves with MRI Technology

August 13, 2014 11:03 am | Videos | Comments

Oncologists are melding magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technology with a traditional ultrasound prostate exam to create a three-dimensional map of the prostate that allows physicians to view growths that were previously undetectable.      

Sierra Leone: Another Top Doctor Dies from Ebola

August 13, 2014 9:21 am | by Clarence Roy-Macaulay and Maria Cheng - Associted Press - Associted Press | News | Comments

A leading physician in Sierra Leone's fight against Ebola has died from the disease, an official said Wednesday, as it emerged that another top doctor had been considered to receive an experimental drug but did not get it and later died.    

Gene Slows Bone Loss, Promotes Bone Formation

August 12, 2014 12:29 pm | News | Comments

A gene discovery brings scientists closer to developing therapeutic agents that could slow down bone loss and regenerate lost bone, which could provide relief for millions suffering from aging-related bone loss.           

Size Matters When Convincing Brain to Eat Healthy Foods

August 12, 2014 12:05 pm | Videos | Comments

Playing with the portions of good and not-so-good-for-you foods is better than trying to eliminate bad foods, according to a new study. The idea is to not give up entirely foods that provide pleasure but aren’t nutritious.         

Priest Dies of Ebola; UN Debates Treatment Ethics

August 12, 2014 8:21 am | by Maria Cheng and Ciaran Giles - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

A Spanish missionary priest being treated for Ebola died Tuesday in a Madrid hospital amid a worldwide debate over who should get experimental Ebola treatments. After holding a teleconference with medical experts around the world, the WHO declared it is ethical to use unproven Ebola drugs and vaccines in the current outbreak.

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Nasal Test Accurately Diagnoses Human Prion Disease

August 7, 2014 9:57 am | News | Comments

A nasal brush test can rapidly and accurately diagnose Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD), an incurable and ultimately fatal neurodegenerative disorder, according to a new study.                     

Low Vitamin D Ups Dementia Risk, Study Says

August 7, 2014 9:51 am | News | Comments

In the largest study of its kind, researchers suggests that in older people, not getting enough vitamin D may double the risk of developing dementia and Alzheimer’s disease.                      

FDA Warns of Infection-causing Tattoo Inks

August 7, 2014 3:23 am | by Mary Clare Jalonick - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

Thinking about getting inked? Check the bottle first. The Food and Drug Administration is warning tattoo parlors, their customers and those buying at-home tattoo kits that not all tattoo ink is safe.               

New Gene Tied to Breast Cancer Risk

August 6, 2014 5:23 pm | by Marilynn Marchione - AP Chief Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

It's long been known that faulty BRCA genes greatly raise the risk for breast cancer. Now, scientists say a more recently identified, less common gene - called PALB2 - can do the same.                 

Scientists Uncover New Clues to Repairing Injured Spinal Cord

August 6, 2014 1:19 pm | News | Comments

Frogs, dogs, whales, snails can all do it, but humans and primates can't. Regrow nerves after an injury, that is— while many animals have this ability, humans don't. But now, new research suggests that a small molecule may be able to convince damaged nerves to grow and effectively rewire circuits.

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Some Saturated Fatty Acids May Carry Bigger Risk Than Others

August 6, 2014 1:08 pm | News | Comments

The relationship between saturated fat and type 2 diabetes may be more complex than previously thought, according a study that claims saturated fatty acids can be associated with both an increased and decreased risk of developing the disease, depending on the type of fatty acids present in the blood.

DNA Modifications Predict Brain’s Threat Response

August 4, 2014 1:01 pm | News | Comments

The tiny addition of a chemical mark atop a gene that is well known for its involvement in clinical depression and posttraumatic stress disorder can affect the way a person’s brain responds to threats, according to a new study.       

New Genetic Risk Markers Found in Pancreatic Cancer

August 4, 2014 12:46 pm | News | Comments

A large DNA analysis of people with and without pancreatic cancer has identified several new genetic markers that signal increased risk of developing the highly lethal disease, scientists report.               

Chili Pepper Chemical May Inhibit Gut Tumors

August 4, 2014 12:35 pm | News | Comments

Researchers report that dietary capsaicin– the active ingredient in chili peppers– produces chronic activation of a receptor on cells lining the intestines of mice, triggering a reaction that ultimately reduces the risk of colorectal tumors.   

Small RNAs in Blood May Reveal Heart Injury

August 4, 2014 12:07 pm | News | Comments

New research suggests that microRNAs may be able to relay valuable information about damage to the heart: Scientists have linked an increase in certain microRNAs circulating in the blood with injury to cardiac muscle.          

Did Lower Testosterone Help Civilize Humanity?

August 4, 2014 11:46 am | News | Comments

A study of 1,400 ancient and modern human skulls suggests that a reduction in testosterone hormone levels accompanied the development of cooperation, complex communication and modern culture some 50,000 years ago.           

African Plant May Be Possible Treatment for Aging Brain

August 4, 2014 11:22 am | News | Comments

Scientists have discovered that a compound isolated from the plant protects cells from altered molecular pathways linked to Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and the neurodegeneration that often follows a stroke.              

Ebola Vaccine Not Far Away

August 4, 2014 9:22 am | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

The nation's top infectious disease official says there's hope that a vaccine against Ebola will be available as early as next July. Dr. Anthony Fauci of the National Institutes of Health says such a preventive vaccine has been successfully tested with monkeys.

Mosaicism: Study Clarifies Parents as Source of New Mutations

July 31, 2014 3:36 pm | News | Comments

Scientists have long speculated that mosaicism plays a bigger role in the transmission of rare disease mutations than is currently known. Now, a study sheds new light on the frequency of mosaicism in genomic disorders and its influence on recurrence risk.

New Way to Generate Insulin-producing Cells in Diabetes

July 31, 2014 3:20 pm | Videos | Comments

A new study has found that a peptide called caerulein can convert existing cells in the pancreas into those cells destroyed in type 1 diabetes-insulin-producing beta cells.                       

FDA to Start Regulating Lab-developed Tests

July 31, 2014 12:24 pm | by Matthew Perron - AP Health Writer - The Associated Press | News | Comments

The Food and Drug Administration says it will begin regulating laboratory-developed tests, a growing class of medical diagnostics that have never before been subject to federal oversight.                  

Drug Target Identified for Common Childhood Blood Cancer

July 31, 2014 12:00 pm | News | Comments

In what is believed to be the largest genetic analysis of what triggers and propels progression of tumor growth in a common childhood blood cancer, researchers report that they have identified a possible new drug target for treating the disease. 

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