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Studying Fetal Liver Fibrogenesis

January 14, 2015 4:07 pm | by Sarah Plumridge, Northwestern University | News | Comments

Fibrosis is a constant feature of all chronic liver diseases.                                 

First Contracting Human Muscle Grown in Lab

January 14, 2015 3:42 pm | by Duke University | News | Comments

The lab-grown tissue should soon allow researchers to test new drugs and study diseases in functioning human muscle outside of the human body.                    

Genetic Predictor of Serious Brain Stroke Complications Discovered

January 13, 2015 3:50 pm | by University of Florida | News | Comments

Researchers have found a possible predictor for little understood -- but often disabling or even fatal -- stroke complications.                       

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Blocking Hormone Could Eliminate Stress Induced Infertility

January 13, 2015 3:41 pm | by UC Berkeley | News | Comments

Scientists have discovered that chronic stress activates a hormone that reduces fertility long after the stress has ended, and that blocking this hormone returns female reproductive behavior to normal.          

One-Size-Fits-All Approach Can Lead to Diabetes Over-Treatment

January 13, 2015 10:30 am | by Yale | News | Comments

Diabetes treatments have saved many lives, but in older patients with multiple medical conditions, aggressively controlling blood sugar with insulin and sulfonylurea drugs, could lead to over-treatment and hypoglycemia (low blood sugar), according to new research by Yale School of Medicine researchers.                          

Mutation Maps

January 13, 2015 9:52 am | News | Comments

DNA sequences were once thought to be identical from cell to cell, but it’s increasingly understood that mutations can arise during brain development that affect only certain groups of brain cells.                                          

Tracing Cancer Back to Its Origins

January 12, 2015 9:23 am | by Columbia University | News | Comments

The fingers of papillary tumors often grow back after surgery, but flat carcinoma in situ cancers are typically more aggressive and more likely to spread.                  

The Bacteria That Help Us Digest Yeast Could Fight Disease

January 12, 2015 9:12 am | by University of Michigan | News | Comments

Bacteria that have evolved to help us digest the yeast that give beer and bread their bubbles could support the development of new treatments to help people fight off yeast infections and autoimmune diseases such as Crohn’s disease.     

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Virtual Reality vs. Real Life: How Brain Neurons Light Up

January 12, 2015 8:56 am | by Cynthia Fox, Science Writer | Articles | Comments

Space-mapping brain neurons do not “light up” in scans when exposed to the virtual reality (VR) at work in kids’ video games, the way they do in the “real world.” The neurons—found in the hippocampus—only mirror the “reality” state some 50 percent of the time.

Brains Keep Memories Tidy By Pruning Innacurate Ones

January 12, 2015 8:52 am | by Princeton University | News | Comments

New research shows that the human brain uses memories to make predictions about what it expects to find in familiar contexts.                       

Biogen Idec, Columbia to Conduct Collaborative Genetics Research

January 12, 2015 8:48 am | by Columbia University | News | Comments

The agreement will integrate genomics research conducted at Columbia with Biogen Idec’s understanding of disease mechanisms and pathways, and expertise in discovering new medicines.             

Sounding Out Speech

January 12, 2015 8:42 am | by Peter Reuell. Harvard Gazette | News | Comments

Among the thorniest challenges in the study of speech perception, the invariance problem was first identified in the 1950s, when scientists began using instruments to analyze spoken language.            

Pros and Cons: Alcohol Consumption for 10M Years

January 8, 2015 5:16 pm | by Cynthia Fox, Science Writer | Articles | Comments

We’ve been imbibing alcohol for ten million years, and the start of that long drinking binge coincided with our descent from the trees. So alcohol may have brought us (along with lots of hangovers), some measure of our humanity.                                               

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Facial Motion Activates Dedicated Network Within Brain

January 8, 2015 5:15 pm | by The Rockefeller University | News | Comments

A face is more than a static collection of features. A shift in gaze, a tightening of the lips, a tilt of the head, these movements convey important clues to someone’s state of mind. Scientists know that two particularly social and visual creatures, humans and rhesus macaque monkeys, have a network of small areas within their brains that become active when shown still images of faces.

Practice Really Does Make Perfect

January 8, 2015 4:52 pm | by University of Cambridge | News | Comments

Researchers from the University of Cambridge and Plymouth University have shown that follow-through – such as when swinging a golf club or tennis racket – can help us to learn two different skills at once, or to learn a single skill faster. 

23andMe, Genentech to Collaborate on Parkinson's Data Project

January 8, 2015 1:47 pm | News | Comments

23andMe and Genentech team up to generate whole genome sequencing data for approximately 3,000 people in 23andMe's Parkinson's disease community.                   

Radiation, Hormone Therapy Prolong Survival for Older Men With Prostate Cancer

January 7, 2015 4:30 pm | by University of Pennsylvania | News | Comments

Adding radiation treatment to hormone therapy saves more lives among older men with locally advanced prostate therapy than hormone therapy alone.                   

Research Findings Have Implications for Regenerating Damaged Nerve Cells

January 7, 2015 4:07 pm | by University of Colorado, Boulder | News | Comments

Two new studies have identified a unique molecule that not only gobbles up bad cells, but also has the ability to repair damaged nerve cells.                    

Trying for Test-Tube Baby? Risks to Mom Are Rare

January 7, 2015 4:01 pm | by Lindsey Tanner - AP Medical Writer | News | Comments

A new 12-year U.S. study shows the most frequent involve drugs used to stimulate ovaries, but it suggests problems are rarely fatal.                      

Transcription Factor Regulates Repair Pathways in the Lung

January 7, 2015 3:55 pm | by Sarah Plumridge, Northwestern University | News | Comments

Scientists have found that a transcription factor protein may be critical for normal respiratory function.                          

Method Developed to Define Stages of Stem Cell Reprogramming

January 7, 2015 3:42 pm | by UCLA | News | Comments

This study provides scientists with a critical new understanding of stem cell development and its role in disease.                         

Surprising New Tools to Rejuvenate the Brain

January 7, 2015 9:55 am | by Claire Conway - USCF | News | Comments

Scientists used to believe that our neurologic fate was sealed at birth with a single, lifetime allotment of brain cells.                                                               

Metabolic Changes Reveal Brain Differences in Bipolar Disorder

January 7, 2015 9:45 am | by Jennifer Brown - University of Iowa | News | Comments

Using a different type of MRI imaging, researchers at the University of Iowa have discovered previously unrecognized differences in the brains of patients with bipolar disorder. In particular, the study, published in the journal Molecular Psychiatry, revealed differences in the white matter of patients' brains and in the cerebellum.

Genetic Clue Points to Most Vulnerable Children

January 7, 2015 9:32 am | by Duke University | News | Comments

Some children are more sensitive to their environments, for better and for worse. Now Duke University researchers have identified a gene variant that may serve as a marker for these children, who are among society’s most vulnerable.  

Researchers Map Direct Gut-Brain Connection

January 7, 2015 9:29 am | by Duke University | News | Comments

Researchers at Duke University have now mapped out another system, a cell-to-cell connection between the gut and the nervous system, that may be more direct than the release of hormones in the blood.              

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