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As Subdural Hematomas Increase, so do Brain Growth Studies

April 17, 2015 2:47 pm | by Cynthia Fox, Science Writer | Articles | Comments

There will be 60,000 annual cases of chronic subdural hematoma (SDH) by 2030, making SDH the U.S.’s most common adult brain surgery disorder, says a new study by New York University (NYU) researchers.

Oldest Ever DNA Sample from Calcified Neanderthal Man

April 17, 2015 1:52 pm | by Sean Alloca, Editor, Forensic Magazine | Articles | Comments

Bones found in an Italian cave over two decades ago might have provided the oldest Neanderthal...

Income and Brain Anatomy

April 17, 2015 9:52 am | by Anne Trafton, MIT | News | Comments

In middle-schoolers, neuroscientists find differences in brain structures where knowledge is...

Fitness Trackers Could Support MS Treatments: Study

April 16, 2015 3:13 pm | by Ryan Bushey, Associate Editor | Articles | Comments

The team of investigators will present their findings this week at the annual American Academy...

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Scientists Use Brain Stimulation to Boost Creativity

April 16, 2015 10:17 am | by UNC | News | Comments

Using a weak electric current to alter a specific brain activity pattern, UNC School of Medicine researchers increased creativity in healthy adults. Now they’re testing the same experimental protocol to alleviate symptoms in people with depression.

Paternal Sperm May Hold Clues to Autism

April 16, 2015 9:49 am | by Johns Hopkins | News | Comments

Tags on DNA from fathers’ sperm linked to children’s autism symptoms.

Wearable Device Slows Deadly Brain Tumors

April 15, 2015 9:14 am | by University of Virginia | News | Comments

A wearable device that emits low-level electrical fields can slow the progression of glioblastoma, the deadliest form of brain cancer, and extend patients’ lifespans.

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IBM Opens Up New Health Data Venture

April 15, 2015 9:01 am | by Ryan Bushey, Associate Editor | Articles | Comments

Apple, Johnson & Johnson, and Medtronic will be partners on this program.

Inside New York's Cryotherapy Lab

April 13, 2015 10:04 am | by Ryan Bushey, Associate Editor | Videos | Comments

This company is offering a peculiar treatment.

Study Deciphers the Noise in the Human Brain

April 10, 2015 9:16 am | by Bruce Goldman, Stanford University | News | Comments

Electrical recordings directly from the human brain show remarkable precision in the coordination of widely distributed regions involved in memory recall, at rest and during sleep.

A Patch for Peanut Allergies

April 9, 2015 11:13 am | by Bevin Fletcher, Associate Editor | Articles | Comments

French biopharmaceutical company DBV Technologies moves closer to bringing its peanut allergy patch to market, receiving Breakthrough Therapy Designation from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration as it prepares to launch its Phase 3 trial.

Distance Running May Be an Evolutionary ‘Signal’ for Desirable Male Genes

April 9, 2015 10:58 am | by University of Cambridge | News | Comments

New research shows that males with higher ‘reproductive potential’ are better distance runners. This may have been used by females as a reliable signal of high male genetic quality during our hunter-gatherer past, as good runners are more likely to have other traits of good hunters and providers, such as intelligence and generosity.

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Don’t Blame Kids if They Do Not Enjoy School, Study Suggests

April 9, 2015 8:59 am | by Jeff Grabmeier, Ohio State University | News | Comments

When children are unmotivated at school, new research suggests their genes may be part of the equation.

Ocular Therapeutix Eye-Pain Implant Fails Crucial Clinical Study

April 9, 2015 8:39 am | by Ryan Bushey, Associate Editor | Articles | Comments

Investors did not seem pleased by these results.

Analyst: India to Lead Asia-Pacific Non-Vascular Stents Market Growth by 2021

April 7, 2015 2:59 pm | by Priya Radhakrishnan, Director of Medical Devices, GlobalData | Articles | Comments

The Asia-Pacific non-vascular stents market, consisting of urinary tract, pancreatic and biliary, enteral, and airway stents, will expand in value from $148.1 million in 2013 to $223.8 million by 2021.

New Genetic Clues Emerge on Origin of Hirschsprung's Disease

April 6, 2015 2:12 pm | by Johns Hopkins | News | Comments

Genetic studies in humans, zebrafish and mice have revealed how two different types of genetic variations team up to cause a rare condition called Hirschsprung’s disease.

New DNA Test Highly Accurate at Detecting Down Syndrome

April 6, 2015 9:37 am | by Columbia University | News | Comments

A test that detects fetal DNA in the mother’s bloodstream is more accurate than conventional screening at identifying Down syndrome (aka trisomy 21), finds a new study led by researchers at Columbia University Medical Center and UCSF.

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Diagnosis By Keyboard

April 2, 2015 9:42 am | by Anne Trafton, MIT | News | Comments

By revealing loss of motor skills, typing patterns may help to identify early onset of Parkinson’s.

Researchers Build Brain-Machine Interface to Control Prosthetic Hand

March 31, 2015 4:13 pm | by University of Houston | News | Comments

A research team from the University of Houston has created an algorithm that allowed a man to grasp a bottle and other objects with a prosthetic hand, powered only by his thoughts.

Playing Music By Professional Musicians Activates Genes For Learning and Memory

March 27, 2015 3:36 pm | by University of Helsinki | News | Comments

Playing music by professional musicians activates genes responsible for brain function and singing of songbirds.

HIV Can Lodge Quickly in Brain After Infection

March 27, 2015 3:15 pm | by Bill Hathaway, Yale University | News | Comments

HIV can establish itself in the brain as soon as four months after initial infection.

The Brain in the Supermarket

March 27, 2015 3:11 pm | by Peter Dizikes, MIT | News | Comments

Researchers suggest that your brain is making a simpler calculation when you shop.

Researchers Help Create 'Gold Standard' Method for Measuring Alzheimer's Disease

March 27, 2015 10:42 am | by Mark Wheeler, UCLA | News | Comments

A team of researchers has validated the first standardized protocol for measuring one of the earliest signs of Alzheimer’s disease.

New Genetic Variant That Causes Autism Identified

March 26, 2015 10:30 am | by Johns Hopkins University | News | Comments

Using a novel approach that homes in on rare families severely affected by autism, a Johns Hopkins-led team of researchers has identified a new genetic cause of the disease.

Changes in Blood-based Molecular Pathway Identified in Alzheimer's

March 24, 2015 11:03 am | by Rockefeller University | News | Comments

New research from Rockefeller University identifies a molecular cascade known as the contact system, which may provide opportunities for early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease through simple blood tests.

Epidural Stimulation Shows Promise for Spinal Cord Injuries

March 23, 2015 3:49 pm | by Bevin Fletcher, Associate Editor | Articles | Comments

Bioscience Technology caught up with Susan Harkema Ph.D., professor and rehabilitation research director of the University of Louisville’s Kentucky Spinal Cord Injury Research Center, to discuss her research and new funding awarded by Wings for Life Spinal Cord Research Foundation for epidural stimulation.

Having a Purpose in Life May Improve Health of Aging Brain

March 23, 2015 9:55 am | by American Heart Association | News | Comments

Having a strong sense that your life has meaning and direction may make you less likely to develop areas of brain damage caused by blockages in blood flow as you age.

Liberians Overcome Fear to Volunteer For Ebola Vaccine Trial

March 23, 2015 9:47 am | by Jonathan Paye-Layleh, Associated Press | News | Comments

Liberians are overcoming their fears of Ebola to volunteer for a vaccine trial.

Altering Brain Chemistry Makes us More Sensitive to Inequality

March 20, 2015 9:42 am | by Thomas Levy, UC Berkeley | News | Comments

A new study by UC Berkeley and UC San Francisco researchers finds that giving a drug that changes the neurochemical balance in the prefrontal cortex of the brain causes a greater willingness to engage in prosocial behaviors, such as ensuring that resources are divided more equally.

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