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Proteins May Slow Memory Loss in People With Alzheimer’s

May 22, 2015 10:04 am | by Iowa State University | News | Comments

Certain proteins may slow the devastating memory loss caused by Alzheimer’s disease, according to a study.

Seeking Deeper Understanding of How the Brain Works

May 22, 2015 9:17 am | by MIT | News | Comments

Edward Boyden develops techniques to study the brain, and how it operates, in finer detail.

Women With MRI Abnormality Nine Times More Likely to Get Breast Cancer

May 22, 2015 9:11 am | by Cynthia Fox, Science Writer | Articles | Comments

Healthy women possessing a certain abnormality on MRIs are nine times more likely to get breast...

Study Explains How Early Childhood Vaccination Reduces Leukemia Risk

May 20, 2015 10:09 am | by University of California San Francisco | News | Comments

A team of researchers has discovered how a commonly administered vaccine protects against acute...

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Researchers Identify Potentially Effective Treatment for Methamphetamine Addiction

May 20, 2015 10:07 am | by UCLA | News | Comments

A new study has found that Naltrexone, a drug used to treat alcoholism, may also be a promising treatment for addiction to methamphetamine.

Neuroscientists ID Part of Brain Devoted to Processing Speech

May 19, 2015 9:49 am | by New York University | News | Comments

A team of  neuroscientists has identified a part of the brain exclusively devoted to processing speech. Its findings point to the superior temporal sulcus (STS), located in the temporal lobe, and help settle a long-standing debate about role-specific neurological functions.

Inflammation Stops the Biological Clock

May 19, 2015 9:33 am | by University of Pennsylvania | News | Comments

An important link between the human body clock and the immune system has relevance for better understanding inflammatory and infectious diseases, researchers discovered.

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Genetic Test for Heightened Prostate Cancer Risk Touted

May 19, 2015 9:01 am | by Seth Augenstein, Digital Reporter | News | Comments

A new genetic test to determine risk factors for prostate cancer can help target the men most likely to develop aggressive forms for the cancer – and make screening a priority for them, according to research presented yesterday at the American Urology Association’s annual conference.

Cognition Improves After Supplemented Mediterranean Diet, Finds a Rare Trial

May 19, 2015 8:54 am | by Cynthia Fox, Science Writer | Articles | Comments

Cognition improves in older people who eat a plant-based Mediterranean diet with antioxidant-rich extra virgin olive oil or mixed nuts, according to rare clinical trial research published by JAMA Internal Medicine.

Orange Juice is Good for Your Brain

May 18, 2015 9:16 am | by Unviersity of Reading | News | Comments

Drinking orange juice could help improve brain function in elderly people, according to new research from the University of Reading.

Vitamin D Levels Help Predict Survival of Sick Cats

May 15, 2015 10:39 am | by Bevin Fletcher, Associate Editor | Articles | Comments

Vitamin D could give your sickly feline friend its 10th life, according to a recent study. New research from the University of Edinburgh found that higher levels of vitamin D were linked to increased survival changes for hospitalized cats.

Electrical Stimulation Accelerates Wound Healing

May 15, 2015 8:54 am | by University of Manchester | News | Comments

The most detailed study to date showing how electrical stimulation accelerates wound healing has been carried out in 40 volunteers by University of Manchester scientists.

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Study: Vitamin B3 May Help Prevent Certain Skin Cancers

May 14, 2015 9:55 am | by Marilynn Marchione, AP Chief Medical Writer | News | Comments

For the first time, a large study suggests that a vitamin might modestly lower the risk of the most common types of skin cancer in people with a history of these relatively harmless yet troublesome growths.

Brains of Smokers Who Quit Successfully Might be Wired for Success

May 14, 2015 9:33 am | by Duke University | News | Comments

Smokers who are able to quit might actually be hard-wired for success, according to a study from Duke Medicine.

GSK Creates New Startup to Find Cure for HIV

May 12, 2015 9:14 am | by Ryan Bushey, Associate Editor | Articles | Comments

GlaxoSmithKline and the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill are teaming up to run this operation. 

Epilepsy Drug Could Help Treat Alzheimer's Disease

May 11, 2015 10:30 am | by University of British Columbia | News | Comments

Researchers say a new epilepsy drug holds promise as a treatment for Alzheimer's disease.

IBM Starts New Precision Medicine Program

May 11, 2015 9:14 am | by Ryan Bushey, Associate Editor | Articles | Comments

Watson, the supercomputer seen on Jeopardy, will play an important role in this partnership.

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Microscope, iPhone App Can Find Parasites in Your Blood

May 8, 2015 8:49 am | by Ryan Bushey, Associate Editor | Videos | Comments

It takes two minutes for this test to find the parasite.

Genes Influence How Your Brain Reacts to Emotional Information

May 7, 2015 11:05 am | by University of British Columbia | News | Comments

Your genes may influence how sensitive you are to emotional information, according to new research. The study, recently published in The Journal of Neuroscience, found that carriers of a certain genetic variation perceived positive and negative images more vividly, and had heightened activity in certain brain regions.

Electric Brain Stimulation Has Mixed Effect on IQ

May 7, 2015 8:54 am | by Ryan Bushey, Associate Editor | Articles | Comments

The goal of the study was to see how transcranial direct current stimulation affected IQ scores. 

Research Finds “Fuzzy Thinking” Effect in Depression, Bipolar Disorder is Real

May 6, 2015 9:50 am | by University of Michigan | News | Comments

 Very large study adds to evidence that mood disorders are points on a spectrum, not completely separate – and could lead to better diagnostic tests.

Growing New Bones without a Human Body

May 6, 2015 8:39 am | by Ryan Bushey, Associate Editor | Videos | Comments

This start-up found a unique way to help the 900,000 patients who have to go through bone-related surgeries each year.

Researchers Say Off-Label Use of Device to Prevent Stroke May Be Dangerous

May 5, 2015 11:22 am | by University of Pennsylvania | News | Comments

Findings suggest need for FDA reassessment of safety and efficacy of devices for off-label use.

Telomere Changes Predict Cancer

May 5, 2015 10:27 am | by Northwestern University | News | Comments

A distinct pattern in the changing length of blood telomeres, the protective end caps on our DNA strands, can predict cancer many years before actual diagnosis, according to a new study.

DNA Suggests All Early Eskimos Migrated from North Slope

May 1, 2015 10:04 am | by Northewestern University | News | Comments

First evidence to genetically tie all Inuit populations to Alaska's North Slope. Genetic testing of Iñupiat people currently living in Alaska’s North Slope is helping scientists fill in the blanks on questions about the migration patterns and ancestral pool of the people who populated the North American Arctic over the last 5,000 years.

A New Way to Think About Migraines

May 1, 2015 9:28 am | by Bevin Fletcher, Associate Editor | Articles | Comments

This is the second of three research findings highlighted by Dr. Rost, vice chair of the American Academy of Neurology Science Committee, at the AAN 67th annual meeting.

Brain Scan Reveals Out-of-Body Illusion

May 1, 2015 9:20 am | by Karolinska Institutet | News | Comments

The feeling of being inside one’s own body is not as self-evident as one might think. In a new study neuroscientists created an out-of-body illusion in participants placed inside a brain scanner. They then used the illusion to perceptually ‘teleport’ the participants to different locations in a room and show that the perceived location of the bodily self can be decoded from activity patterns in specific brain regions.

3 Boys Saved by Customized Airway Tube Made on 3-D Printer

April 30, 2015 9:04 am | by Lauren Neergaard, Associated Press Medical Writer | News | Comments

In a striking example of how 3-D printers could customize medical care, doctors turned powdered plastic into tiny devices that saved the lives of three baby boys by holding open defective airways so they could breathe - and the implants even expanded as the tots grew.

Cardiorespiratory Fitness Contributes to Successful Brain Aging

April 29, 2015 10:08 am | by Boston University | News | Comments

Cardiorespiratory fitness may positively impact the structure of white matter in the brains of older adults. These results suggest that exercise could be prescribed to lessen age-related declines in brain structure.

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