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Proteins Direct Precursors of Pyramidal Cells to Their Destination

October 24, 2014 11:26 am | News | Comments

Researchers have now discovered that FLRT proteins on the surface of progenitor cells can induce repellent and attractant signals depending on its binding partner.                         

New Weight Loss Regulation Clues Discovered

October 24, 2014 11:18 am | News | Comments

A hormone seen as a popular target to develop weight loss drugs works by directly...

Brain Remains Stable During Learning, Model Shows

October 24, 2014 10:28 am | News | Comments

Complex biochemical signals that coordinate fast and slow changes in neuronal networks...

Thyroid Cancer Genome Analysis Finds Markers of Aggressive Tumors

October 24, 2014 10:21 am | News | Comments

A new comprehensive analysis of thyroid cancer from The Cancer Genome Atlas Research...

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Protein Discovery May Unlock New HIV Treatment

October 24, 2014 10:16 am | Videos | Comments

Like a slumbering dragon, HIV can lay dormant in a person’s cells for years, evading medical treatments only to wake up and strike at a later time, quickly replicating itself and destroying the immune system. Scientists have now uncovered a new protein that participates in active HIV replication.

Scientists ID Gene Required for Recovery from Bacterial Infection

October 24, 2014 10:07 am | News | Comments

Researchers have uncovered the genes that are normally activated during recovery from bacterial infection. The finding could lead to ways to jumpstart this recovery process and possibly fend off autoimmune diseases and chronic inflammatory disorders.

WHO: Millions of Ebola Vaccine Doses Ready in 2015

October 24, 2014 10:00 am | by Maria Cheng - AP Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

The World Health Organization says millions of doses of two experimental Ebola vaccines could be ready for use in 2015 and five more experimental vaccines will start being tested in March.                 

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NYC Tries to Ease Ebola Fear After Doctor Infected

October 24, 2014 2:26 am | by Jonathan Lemire and Colleen Long - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

Officials tried to tamp down New Yorkers' fears Friday after a doctor was diagnosed with Ebola in a city where millions of people squeeze into crowded subways, buses and elevators every day.                 

Scientists to Use Tiny Particles to Fight Big Diseases

October 23, 2014 12:49 pm | Videos | Comments

Physicians will tell you: They are not winning the war on ovarian cancer. But researchers have combined medicine and advanced nanotechnological engineering to create a smarter, more targeted therapy that could overcome the most lethal gynecologic cancer.

New ALS-associated Gene Identified

October 23, 2014 12:33 pm | News | Comments

Using an innovative exome sequencing strategy, a team of international scientists has shown that TUBA4A, the gene encoding the Tubulin Alpha 4A protein, is associated with familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS).         

Environment Could Improve Stem Cell Therapies

October 23, 2014 12:27 pm | News | Comments

Stem cell therapies are being hailed as a potential cure for many major health conditions, but there is much still to learn about the highly complex environments needed to optimize these therapies, according to new research.       

Study Clarifies How Body Defends Against Harmful Bacteria

October 23, 2014 12:14 pm | News | Comments

Researchers have identified an unusual process by which the body can sense the presence of pathogenic bacteria and destroy them. Rather than detect the microbes directly, individual cells monitor how the bacteria interfere with the functioning of energy-producing cellular structures called mitochondria.

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Fast Modeling of Cancer Mutations

October 23, 2014 12:06 pm | News | Comments

Researchers now developed a new way to model the effects of these genetic mutations in mice. The approach, based on the genome-editing technique known as CRISPR, is much faster than existing strategies, which require genetically engineering mice that carry the cancerous mutations.

Real-time System Monitors Dangerous Bacteria in the Body

October 23, 2014 11:56 am | News | Comments

Combining a PET scanner with a new chemical tracer that selectively tags specific types of bacteria, researchers working with mice report they have devised a way to detect and monitor in real time infections with a class of dangerous Gram-negative bacteria.

U.S. to Track Everyone Coming from Ebola Nations

October 23, 2014 8:30 am | by Mike Stobbe - AP Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

All travelers who come into the U.S. from three Ebola-stricken West African nations will now be monitored for three weeks, the latest step by federal officials to keep the disease from spreading into the country.            

Tackling Blindness, Deafness Through Neuroengineering

October 22, 2014 2:26 pm | News | Comments

The Bertarelli Program in Translational Neuroscience and Neuroengineering, a collaborative program between Harvard Medical School and the École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL) in Switzerland, has announced a new set of grants worth $3.6 million for five research projects.

Childhood Autism Linked to Air Toxics

October 22, 2014 2:13 pm | News | Comments

Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) were more likely to have been exposed to higher levels of certain air toxics during their mothers’ pregnancies and the first two years of life compared to children without the condition, according to a new study.

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Olive Oil More Stable, Healthful for Frying Food

October 22, 2014 1:52 pm | News | Comments

Before dunking your favorite food in a vat of just any old oil, consider using olive. Scientists are reporting that olive oil withstands the heat of the fryer or pan better than several seed oils to yield more healthful food.       

Skin Patch May Replace Syringe for Disease Diagnosis

October 22, 2014 1:46 pm | News | Comments

Drawing blood and testing it is standard practice for many medical diagnostics. As a less painful alternative, scientists are developing skin patches that could one day replace the syringe.                  

Hidden Subpopulation of Melanoma Cells Discovered

October 22, 2014 1:40 pm | News | Comments

Researchers have pinpointed a set of intriguing characteristics in a previously unknown subpopulation of melanoma cancer cells in blood vessels of tumors.                           

Red Cross Official: 6 Months to Contain Ebola

October 22, 2014 3:26 am | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

A top Red Cross official says he is confident the Ebola epidemic can be contained within four to six months. The Ebola outbreak has killed more than 4,500 people since it emerged 10 months ago, with Liberia, Guinea and Sierra Leone the worst-affected countries.

Cancer Drug Resistance Has an ‘Off Switch’

October 21, 2014 11:29 am | Videos | Comments

Scientists have uncovered details about how cancer is able to become drug resistant over time, a phenomenon that occurs because cancer cells within the same tumor aren’t identical.                     

See-through Sensors Open New Window into the Brain

October 21, 2014 11:18 am | News | Comments

Developing invisible implantable medical sensor arrays, a team of engineers has overcome a major technological hurdle in researchers’ efforts to understand the brain.                         

Tarantula Venom Illuminates Electrical Activity in Live Cells

October 21, 2014 11:01 am | Videos | Comments

Researchers have created a cellular probe that combines a tarantula toxin with a fluorescent compound to help scientists observe electrical activity in neurons and other cells.                     

Oscillating Mitochondria Imaged in Live Animal

October 21, 2014 10:52 am | News | Comments

Mitochondrial oscillations have quietly bewildered scientists for more than 40 years. Now, a team of scientists has imaged mitochondria for the first time oscillating in a live animal, in this case, the salivary glands of laboratory rats.    

B Vitamins Can Help Beat Depression

October 21, 2014 10:39 am | News | Comments

Supplementing current anti-depressant medication with B vitamins improves response to treatment, according to a new study.                                     

Why Ebola Kills Some People, Others Survive

October 21, 2014 10:29 am | by Lauran Neergaard - AP Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

People who shared an apartment with the country's first Ebola patient are emerging from quarantine healthy. And while Thomas Eric Duncan died and two U.S. nurses were infected caring for him, there are successes, too: A nurse infected in Spain has recovered, as have four American aid workers infected in West Africa. Even there, not everyone dies.

CDC Releases Revised Ebola Gear Guidelines

October 21, 2014 8:26 am | by Mike Stobbe - AP Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

Health officials have released new guidelines for how health workers should gear up to treat Ebola patients. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released the long-anticipated updates on Monday evening.           

Nigeria Declared Ebola-free; 'Spectacular Success'

October 20, 2014 3:26 pm | by Michelle Faul - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

Water laced with salt and sugar, and gallons of the nasty-tasting stuff. Doctors who survived Ebola in Nigeria credited heavy doses of fluids with saving their lives as the Who declared the country Ebola-free Monday.          

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