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Vitamin B3 Might Have Been Made in Space, Delivered to Earth by Meteorites

April 18, 2014 1:55 pm | News | Comments

Ancient Earth might have had an extraterrestrial supply of vitamin B3 delivered by carbon-rich meteorites, according to a new analysis by NASA-funded researchers. The result supports a theory that the origin of life may have been assisted by a supply of key molecules created in space and brought to Earth by comet and meteor impacts.

Building 'Smart' Cell-Based Therapies

April 18, 2014 1:38 pm | News | Comments

A Northwestern synthetic biology team has created a new technology for modifying human cells to...

Deadly Human Pathogen Cryptococcus Fully Sequenced

April 18, 2014 12:36 pm | News | Comments

Researchers have sequenced the entire genome and all the RNA products of the most important...

Researchers Develop New Model of Cellular Movement

April 18, 2014 12:27 pm | News | Comments

Cell movement plays an important role in a host of biological functions from embryonic...

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Chronic Inflammation May Be Linked to Aggressive Prostate Cancer

April 18, 2014 12:11 pm | News | Comments

The presence of chronic inflammation in benign prostate tissue was associated with high-grade, or aggressive, prostate cancer, and this association was found even in those with low prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels, according to a new study.

Protein Essential for Fertilization Discovered

April 17, 2014 1:06 pm | Videos | Comments

Researchers have discovered interacting proteins on the surface of the sperm and the egg essential to begin mammalian life. These proteins offer new paths towards improved fertility treatments and the development of new contraceptives.     

Scientists Explain How Memories Stick Together

April 17, 2014 12:46 pm | News | Comments

Scientists have created a new model of memory that explains how neurons retain select memories a few hours after an event. This new framework provides a more complete picture of how memory works, which can inform research into disorders liked Parkinson's and Alzheimer's.

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Groundbreaking MRI Scan Shows Brown Fat in Tissues

April 17, 2014 12:22 pm | News | Comments

Researchers used an MRI-based method to identify and confirm the presence of brown adipose tissue in a living adult, which could prove to be an essential step towards a new wave of therapies to aid the fight against diabetes and obesity.   

Ebola Virus in Africa Outbreak is New Strain

April 16, 2014 5:21 pm | by Marilynn Marchione - AP Chief Medical Writer | News | Comments

The Ebola virus that has killed scores of people in Guinea this year is a new strain - evidence that the disease did not spread there from outbreaks in some other African nations, scientists report.               

Teenage Concussions Linked to Higher Rates of Suicide Attempts

April 16, 2014 2:04 pm | News | Comments

Teenagers who have suffered a traumatic brain injury such as a concussion are at “significantly greater odds” of attempting suicide, being bullied and engaging in a variety of high risk behaviors, a new study has found.          

Diabetes Cases Nearly Doubled Over Past Two Decades

April 16, 2014 1:52 pm | News | Comments

Cases of diabetes and pre-diabetes in the United States have nearly doubled since 1988, suggests new research, with obesity apparently to blame for the surge.                           

Scientists Discover Brain’s Anti-distraction System

April 16, 2014 1:38 pm | News | Comments

Psychologists have presented the first study to reveal that our brains rely on an active suppression mechanism to avoid being distracted by salient irrelevant information when we want to focus on a particular item or task.         

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DNA Looping Damage Tied to HPV Cancer

April 16, 2014 1:26 pm | News | Comments

It’s long been known that certain strains of human papillomavirus (HPV) cause cancer. Now, researchers have determined a new way that HPV might spark cancer development– by disrupting the human DNA sequence with repeating loops when the virus is inserted into host-cell DNA as it replicates.

The Key to Easy Asthma Diagnosis is in the Blood

April 16, 2014 1:07 pm | News | Comments

Using just a single drop of blood, a team of UW-Madison researchers has developed a faster, cheaper and more accurate tool for diagnosing even mild cases of asthma. This handheld technology—which takes advantage of a previously unknown correlation between asthmatic patients and the most abundant type of white blood cells in the body—means doctors could diagnose asthma even if their patients are not experiencing symptoms during their visit.

Breaking News: Marijuana Use Linked to Brain Abnormalities

April 16, 2014 8:30 am | News | Comments

Young adults who used marijuana only recreationally showed significant abnormalities in two brain regions that are important in emotion and motivation. This is the first study to show casual use of marijuana is related to major brain changes.  

Young Dads at High Risk of Depression, Too

April 15, 2014 12:07 pm | News | Comments

Depression can hit young fathers hard- with symptoms increasing dramatically during some of the most important years of their children’s lives, a new study has found.                        

First Volunteers to Receive Blood Cultured from Stem Cells in 2016

April 15, 2014 12:01 pm | News | Comments

The first human volunteer will receive red blood cells cultured in the laboratory within the next three years, as part of a long-term research program funded by the Wellcome Trust.                    

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Drawing a Ring Around Antiviral Immunity

April 15, 2014 11:37 am | News | Comments

If you follow cancer biology, then you’ve probably heard of ubiquitin before. In a recent paper researchers provided a structural rationale for how ubiquitin helps RIG-I do its job— and how that might help keep the immune system from getting out of hand.

Central Ohio Mumps Outbreak Tops 200 Cases

April 14, 2014 8:18 pm | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

A mumps outbreak in central Ohio has grown to more than 200 confirmed cases, public health officials said. A total of 212 cases of the contagious viral illness, with 132 of those linked to Ohio State University, have been reported.    

Regenerating Muscle in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy: Age Matters

April 14, 2014 1:50 pm | News | Comments

A team of scientists published details of how a class of drugs called “HDACis” drive muscle-cell regeneration in the early stages of dystrophic muscles, but fail to work in late stages. The findings are key to furthering clinical development of HDACis for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), an incurable muscle-wasting disease.

Scientists Grow Cartilage to Reconstruct Nose

April 11, 2014 1:54 pm | News | Comments

Scientists at the University of Basel report first ever successful nose reconstruction surgery using cartilage grown in the laboratory. Cartilage cells were extracted from the patient’s nasal septum, multiplied and expanded onto a collagen membrane. The so-called engineered cartilage was then shaped according to the defect and implanted.

Synthetic Collagen Promotes Natural Clotting

April 10, 2014 2:40 pm | News | Comments

Synthetic collagen invented at Rice University may help wounds heal by directing the natural clotting of blood. The material, KOD, mimics natural collagen, a fibrous protein that binds cells together into organs and tissues. It could improve upon commercial sponges or therapies based on naturally derived porcine or bovine-derived collagen now used to aid healing during or after surgery.

Scientists Try 3-D Printer to Build Human Heart

April 9, 2014 8:20 pm | by Dylan Lovan - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

Scientists are attempting to build a human heart with a 3-D printer. Ultimately, the goal is to create a new heart for a patient with their own cells that could be transplanted. It is an ambitious project to first, make a heart and then get it to work in a patient, and it could be years — perhaps decades — before a 3-D printed heart would ever be put in a person.

Breaking News: Coffee Intake Linked to Liver Cancer Risk

April 9, 2014 11:16 am | News | Comments

The more cups of coffee a person drank, the lower the risk for developing hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), the most common type of liver cancer, according to new research.                       

Researcher to Examine Health Impacts of Space Travel in NASA-Funded Twin Study

April 8, 2014 1:54 pm | News | Comments

When NASA sends an identical twin to the International Space Station next year, a Colorado State University researcher will be among just a few hand-picked scientists studying him and his brother to measure impacts of space travel on the human body.

Antimicrobial from Soaps Promotes Bacteria Buildup in Human Noses

April 8, 2014 1:48 pm | News | Comments

An antimicrobial agent found in common household soaps, shampoos, and toothpastes may be finding its way inside human noses where it promotes the colonization of Staphylococcus aureus bacteria and could predispose some people to infection.

Noses Made in Britain: UK Touts Lab-grown Organs

April 8, 2014 1:20 pm | by Maria Cheng - AP Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

In a north London hospital, scientists are growing noses, ears and blood vessels in a bold attempt to make body parts in the laboratory. It's far from the only lab in the world that is pursuing the futuristic idea of growing organs for transplant. But the London work was showcased Tuesday as Mayor Boris Johnson announced a plan to attract more labs to do cutting-edge health and science research in the area.

Blood Test Could Accurately Detect Solid Cancers

April 7, 2014 2:12 pm | News | Comments

Researchers have devised a way to quickly bring to the clinic the technique of using blood samples to diagnose many types of solid cancers, or to monitor the amount of cancer in a patient’s body and responses to treatment.        

Genetic Flaw May Hold Key to Deadly Brain Tumor

April 7, 2014 1:41 pm | News | Comments

Scientists may have discovered a new way to treat a type of childhood brain tumor that has proved incurable up until now, according to a recent study.                             

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