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3 Win Chemistry Nobel for Super-zoom Microscopes

October 8, 2014 10:36 am | by Karl Ritter and Malin Rising – Associated Press – Associated Press | News | Comments

Two Americans and a German scientist won the Nobel Prize in chemistry Wednesday for finding ways to make microscopes more powerful than previously thought possible, allowing scientists to see how diseases develop inside the tiniest cells.   

Cost of Ebola Could Top $32B

October 8, 2014 7:36 am | by Deb Riechmann - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

The economic impact of the Ebola epidemic could reach $32.6 billion by the end of next year if the disease ravaging Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone spreads to neighboring countries in West Africa, the World Bank Group said Wednesday.     

Americans Living Longer as Most Death Rates Fall

October 8, 2014 12:35 am | by Mike Stobbe - AP Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

Americans are living longer than ever before, according to a new government report filled mostly with good news. U.S. life expectancy inched up again and death rates fell. Rates also dropped or held steady for nearly all the leading causes of death.

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Gene Mutation Could Prevent Weight Gain from High-sugar Diet

October 7, 2014 1:38 pm | News | Comments

Imagine being able to take a pill that lets you eat all of the ice cream, cookies, and cakes that you wanted– without gaining any weight. New research found a new way to suppress the obesity that accompanies a high-sugar diet, pinning it down to a key gene that pharmaceutical companies have already developed drugs to target.

Green Tea-based ‘Missiles’ May Kill Cancer Cells

October 7, 2014 1:17 pm | News | Comments

Green tea has long been known for its anti-oxidant, anti-cancer, anti-aging and anti-microbial properties. Now, a group of researchers has taken the health benefits of green tea to the next level by using one of its ingredients to develop a drug delivery system.

Ebola in Spain Raises Questions About Protection

October 7, 2014 10:36 am | by Ciaran Giles - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

Three more people were put under quarantine for possible Ebola at a Madrid hospital where a Spanish nurse became infected, authorities said Tuesday. More than 50 others were being monitored as experts tried to figure out why Spain's anti-infection practices failed.

First Womb-transplant Baby Won't be Alone for Long

October 7, 2014 9:36 am | by Maria Cheng - AP Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

The world's first baby born from a transplanted womb is soon to have company. Two more women who became pregnant after having womb transplants are due to deliver in the next few weeks.                    

Coffee-drinking Genes Identified

October 7, 2014 4:35 am | by Malcolm Ritter - AP Science Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

How much coffee do you drink every day? One cup in the morning? Or do you gulp it all day? Scientists have long known that your DNA influences how much java you consume. Now a huge study has identified some genes that may play a role.     

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Six Die in Southern China Dengue Outbreak

October 7, 2014 1:35 am | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

The dengue virus has killed six people and infected more than 21,000 in southern China's worst outbreak of the mosquito-transmitted disease in about two decades, officials said Tuesday.                   

A New Way to Extract Bone-making Cells from Fat Tissue

October 6, 2014 12:20 pm | News | Comments

By sorting human fat tissue cells by their expression of a certain gene, scientists were able to retrieve a high yield of cells that showed an especially strong propensity to make bone tissue.                 

Identical Twin Study Reveals Diabetes Clues

October 6, 2014 11:33 am | News | Comments

By studying identical twins, researchers have identified mechanisms that could be behind the development of type 2 diabetes. This may explain cases where one identical twin develops type 2 diabetes while the other remains healthy.      

Height 'Almost Completely Determined' by Genetics

October 6, 2014 11:26 am | News | Comments

The largest genome-wide association study (GWAS) to date, involving more than 300 institutions and more than 250,000 subjects, roughly doubles the number of known gene regions influencing height to more than 400.           

Journalist with Ebola Arrives at Nebraska Hospital

October 6, 2014 8:35 am | by Josh Funk - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

A plane carrying an American photojournalist who contracted Ebola while working in Liberia landed Monday in Nebraska, where he will undergo treatment for the deadly disease. The specially equipped plane Ashoka Mukpo landed at Eppley Airfield in Omaha at around 7:30 a.m. Monday.

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Medicine Nobel Goes to Discovery of Brain's GPS

October 6, 2014 7:36 am | by Karl Ritter and Jill Lawless - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

A U.S.-British scientist and a Norwegian husband-and-wife research team won the Nobel Prize in medicine Monday for discovering the brain's navigation system - the inner GPS that helps us find our way in the world - a revelation that could lead to advances in diagnosing Alzheimer's.

‘Mini-stroke’ May Lead to PTSD

October 3, 2014 2:46 pm | News | Comments

A “mini-stroke” may increase your risk of developing post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), according to new research. The study found that one in three transient ischemic attack (TIA) patients develop PTSD.         

Curiosity Helps Learning, Memory

October 3, 2014 2:32 pm | News | Comments

Curiosity helps us learn about a topic, and being in a curious state also helps the brain memorize unrelated information, according to new research. The study provides insight into how piquing our curiosity changes our brains.        

Viral Infection May Trigger Childhood Diabetes in Utero

October 3, 2014 2:26 pm | News | Comments

The exact cause of juvenile type 1 diabetes has eluded scientists, but a new study suggests a likely trigger before birth. A recent paper puts forth evidence that the autoimmune disease is initiated in utero.           

Ancient Protein-making Enzyme Moonlights as DNA Protector

October 3, 2014 2:18 pm | News | Comments

Scientists have found that an enzyme best known for its fundamental role in building proteins has a second major function: to protect DNA during times of cellular stress.                       

New Visualization Software Uncovers Cancer Subtypes

October 3, 2014 1:42 pm | News | Comments

Much of biomedical research these days is about big data—collecting and analyzing vast, detailed repositories of information about health and disease. These data sets can be treasure troves for investigators, often uncovering genetic mutations that drive a particular kind of cancer, for example.

DNA ‘Bias’ May Keep Some Diseases in Circulation

October 2, 2014 2:50 pm | News | Comments

A new study found that a bias toward certain types of DNA sequences during gene conversion may be an important factor in why certain heritable diseases persist in populations around the world.                 

Predicting Abstract Judgments from Brain Waves

October 2, 2014 2:44 pm | News | Comments

People make immediate judgments about images they are shown, which could impact on their decisions, even before their brains have had time to consciously process the information, a study of brainwaves has found.            

Schizophrenia, Bipolar Disorder Linked to Dendritic Spine Loss in Brain

October 2, 2014 2:32 pm | News | Comments

Schizophrenia and bipolar disorder both appear to be associated with dendritic spine loss in the brain, according to a new study, which suggests that the two distinct disorders may share common pathophysiological features.        

Making Old Lungs Look New Again

October 2, 2014 2:21 pm | News | Comments

New research shows that the lungs become more inflammatory with age and that ibuprofen can lower that inflammation. In fact, immune cells from old mouse lungs fought tuberculosis bacteria as effectively as cells from young mice after lung inflammation was reduced by ibuprofen.

Liberia to Prosecute Man Who Brought Ebola to U.S.

October 2, 2014 1:35 pm | by David Warren - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

Liberia plans to prosecute the airline passenger who brought Ebola into the U.S., alleging that he lied on an airport questionnaire about not having any contact with an infected person, authorities said Thursday.           

Gluten Timing Does Not Prevent Celiac Disease

October 1, 2014 5:36 pm | by Marilynn Marchione - AP Chief Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

Two studies give disappointing news for parents looking for a way to prevent celiac disease in babies at higher risk for it because of family history. Neither breast-feeding nor timing the start of gluten-containing foods makes a difference in whether a child develops the problem.

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