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Engineer Invents Safe Way to Transfer Energy to Medical Chips in the Body

May 20, 2014 12:23 pm | Videos | Comments

A Stanford electrical engineer has invented a way to wirelessly transfer power deep inside the body and then use this power to run tiny electronic medical gadgets such as pacemakers, nerve stimulators or new sensors and devices yet to be developed.

Taste Test: Could Sense of Taste Affect Length of Life?

May 20, 2014 11:42 am | News | Comments

Perhaps one of the keys to good health isn’t just what you eat but how you taste it. Taste buds may in fact have a powerful role in a long and healthy life – at least for fruit flies. Researchers found that suppressing the animal’s ability to taste its food –regardless of how much it actually eats – can significantly increase or decrease its length of life and potentially promote healthy aging.

Racing the Clock to Help Young Patients with Old Hearts

May 20, 2014 11:27 am | News | Comments

Children with progeria, a rare disorder that causes premature aging, die in their teens of ailments that are common in octogenarians: heart failure and stroke. Kan Cao, a University of Maryland assistant professor of cell biology and molecular genetics, urgently wants to help find a cure. Cao and her colleagues have taken a big step in that direction, showing that a toxic protein destroys muscle cells inside the patients’ arteries.

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Solution to Helping Teens with Chronic Disease May be at Fingertips

May 20, 2014 11:13 am | News | Comments

Adolescents with chronic diseases (ACD), such as cystic fibrosis, gastrointestinal disorders (including Crohn’s disease) and Type 1 diabetes, often find the transition of managing their health care needs into adulthood to be challenging. Preparations for this transition are often clinic-based, costly and do not fully or effectively engage with this patient population.

Study Debunks Common Myth That Urine is Sterile

May 19, 2014 2:02 pm | News | Comments

Bacteria live in the bladders of healthy women, discrediting the common belief that normal urine is sterile. The study also revealed that bladder bacteria in healthy women differ from the bladder bacteria in women affected by overactive bladder.

Two Proteins Play Key Role in Rheumatoid Arthritis

May 19, 2014 1:57 pm | News | Comments

Two protein molecules that fit together as lock and key seem to promote the abnormal formation of blood vessels in joints affected by rheumatoid arthritis, according to researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago College of Medicine, who found that the substances are present at higher levels in the joints of patients affected by the disease.

Study Finds Limited Benefit for Vitamin D in Asthma Treatment

May 19, 2014 1:46 pm | News | Comments

Adding vitamin D to asthma treatment to improve breathing only appears to benefit patients who achieve sufficient levels of the supplement in the blood. Overall, the ability to control asthma did not differ between a study group that received vitamin D supplements and a group that received placebo, according to new research.

MERS Virus Spread Person-to-person, CDC Says

May 19, 2014 1:34 pm | by Mike Stobbe, Associated Press | News | Comments

Health officials reported Saturday what appears to be the first time that a mysterious Middle East virus has spread from one person to another in the United States.                         

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Risk of Brain Injury is Genetic

May 19, 2014 1:03 pm | News | Comments

Premature babies’ risk of brain injury is influenced by their genes, a new study suggests. The researchers have identified a link between injury to the developing brain and common variation in genes associated with schizophrenia and the metabolism of fat.

Research Leads to New Understanding of How Cells Grow, Shrink

May 16, 2014 1:19 pm | Videos | Comments

For a century, biologists have thought they understood how the gooey growth that occurs inside cells causes their protective outer walls to expand. Now, researchers have captured the visual evidence to prove the prevailing wisdom wrong.    

Male Infertility Linked to Mortality

May 16, 2014 12:52 pm | News | Comments

Men who are infertile because of defects in their semen appear to be at increased risk of dying sooner than men with normal semen, according to a new study.                           

The Promise of Personalized Medicine: An Apples-to-Apples Approach

May 16, 2014 12:18 pm | Videos | Comments

In our sixth video, Andrew Wiecek wraps up the discussion by taking a look at one of the therapeutic areas that could be significantly improved by personalized medicine: cancer. The approach is similar to comparing apples to apples, he says.

Red Wine May Not Prevent Heart Disease, Prolong Life

May 16, 2014 10:39 am | News | Comments

There is bad news for those who believe drinking red wine is protecting their hearts and extending their lives. A study found that a plant compound in grapes—resveratrol—may not provide such health benefits. The nine-year study found resveratrol had no significant effect on longevity, inflammation, cardiovascular disease, or cancer.

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Older Migraine Sufferers More Likely to Have a Silent Brain Injury

May 15, 2014 4:25 pm | News | Comments

Older migraine sufferers may be more likely to have silent brain injury, according to new research. In the study, people with a history of migraine headaches had double the odds of ischemic silent brain infarction compared to people who said they didn’t have migraines. 

Breaking News: Genes May Verify Earliest American Inhabitants

May 15, 2014 2:12 pm | News | Comments

A new study uses genetic information extracted from the remains of an adolescent girl to help resolve the longstanding debate about the origins of the first people to inhabit the Americas.                  

Blood Seeking Mosquitoes

May 15, 2014 12:41 pm | by Skip Derra | Articles | Comments

Insights into controlling mosquitoes often focuses on how they are attracted to humans, which is by smelling the carbon dioxide we exhale. But once they get close to us, mosquitos often steer toward exposed areas of skin such as ankles and feet. New research has shown that an often overlooked mosquito organ, the maxillary palp, plays an important role in mosquito targeting.

Hazardous Flame Retardants Found in Child Care Settings

May 15, 2014 11:17 am | News | Comments

A new study of preschools and day care centers finds that flame retardants are prevalent indoors, potentially exposing young children to chemicals known to be hazardous.                       

Where Have All the Mitochondria Gone?

May 15, 2014 11:16 am | Videos | Comments

It’s common knowledge that all organisms inherit their mitochondria—the cell’s “power plants”—from their mothers. But what happens to all the father’s mitochondria? How—and why—paternal mitochondria are prevented from getting passed on to their offspring after fertilization is still shrouded in mystery.

Caffeine Helps Premature Babies Breathe Easier

May 15, 2014 11:12 am | News | Comments

The caffeine in coffee that might help get you going in the morning can be lifesaving for premature babies. For more than a decade, neonatologists have routinely given premature newborns caffeine as a respiratory stimulant, helping their immature lungs and brains remember to breathe.

Researchers ID Gene That Causes Obesity-related Metabolic Syndrome

May 15, 2014 11:05 am | News | Comments

New research has identified a genetic mutation responsible for the cluster of cardiovascular risk factors that comprise the obesity-related metabolic syndrome.                          

Measles Vaccine Can Kill Multiple Myeloma Cells

May 15, 2014 11:00 am | Videos | Comments

In a proof-of-principle clinical trial, researchers have demonstrated that virotherapy— destroying cancer with a virus that infects and kills cancer cells but spares normal tissues— can be effective against the deadly cancer multiple myeloma.   

Single Episode of Binge Drinking Linked to Gut Leakage and Immune System Effects

May 15, 2014 10:52 am | News | Comments

A single alcohol binge can cause bacteria to leak from the gut and increase levels of bacterial toxins in the blood, according to a study funded by the National Institutes of Health. Increased levels of these bacterial toxins, called endotoxins, were shown to affect the immune system, with the body producing more immune cells involved in fever, inflammation, and tissue destruction.

Scientists Investigate the Role of the ‘Silent Killer’ Inside Deep-Diving Animals

May 15, 2014 10:36 am | News | Comments

Carbon monoxide is produced naturally in small quantities in humans and animals, and in recent years medical researchers have evaluated the gas as a treatment for diabetes, heart attacks, sepsis, and other illnesses. Scientists have furthered understanding of carbon monoxide’s natural characteristics and limitations by studying the gas in one of the world’s best divers: the elephant seal.

Anti-Depressant Reduces Alzheimer’s Plaque Growth by 78 Percent

May 14, 2014 2:03 pm | by Cynthia Fox | Articles | Comments

A common antidepressant can dramatically halt growth of Alzheimer’s plaque. A team from Missouri and Pennsylvania report today in Science Translational Medicine this reduction occurs in both humans and mice. It gives the drug, the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) citalopram, a possible future role as a prophylactic—the first in Alzheimer’s Disease (AD), if bigger studies are supportive.

A New Approach to Treating Peanut and Other Food Allergies

May 14, 2014 1:35 pm | News | Comments

These days, more and more people seem to have food allergies, which can sometimes have life-threatening consequences. Scientists report the development of a new type of flour that someday could be used in food-based therapies to help people better tolerate their allergy triggers, including peanuts.

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