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3-D Mammograms May Find More Breast Cancer

June 24, 2014 5:19 pm | by Lindsey Tanner - AP Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

3-D mammograms may be better at finding cancer than regular scans, a large study suggests, although whether that means saving more lives isn't known. The study involved almost half a million breast scans, with more than one-third of them using relatively new 3-D imaging along with conventional scans.

Ferroelectric Switching Seen in Biological Tissues

June 24, 2014 12:57 pm | News | Comments

Researchers have shown that a favorable electrical property is present in a type of protein found in organs that repeatedly stretch and retract, such as the lungs, heart and arteries. These findings are the first that clearly track this phenomenon, called ferroelectricity, occurring at the molecular level in biological tissues.

Computer-aided Diagnosis of Rare Genetic Disorders from Family Snaps

June 24, 2014 11:59 am | News | Comments

Oxford University researchers have come up with a computer program that recognizes facial features in photographs; looks for similarities with facial structures for various conditions, such as Down's syndrome, Angelman syndrome, or Progeria; and returns possible matches ranked by likelihood.

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Engineer to Grow Replacement Tissue for Torn Rotator Cuffs

June 23, 2014 2:50 pm | News | Comments

A Case Western Reserve University engineer has won a $1.7 million National Institutes of Health (NIH) grant to grow replacement rotator cuffs and other large tendon groups to help heal injured soldiers and athletes, accident victims, and an aging population that wants to remain active.

Researchers Identify Mechanism that Could Help Old Muscle Grow

June 19, 2014 9:45 am | News | Comments

Sarcopenia–the significant loss of muscle mass and function that can occur as we age–is associated with many chronic conditions such as diabetes, high cholesterol and obesity.  In new findings, researchers identify a muscle-building mechanism that could be important in addressing sarcopenia.

Asthma Rates Drop but Experts Not Breathing Easier

June 19, 2014 12:20 am | by Mike Stobbe - AP Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

A new survey suggests asthma in the U.S. may finally be on the decline. But the results are so surprising that health officials are cautious about claiming a downturn. The findings come from a large national health survey conducted last year. The drop could just be an unexplained statistical blip, and researchers say they are waiting for data from this year before proclaiming asthma is on the decline.

FDA Prepping Long-awaited Plan to Reduce Salt

June 17, 2014 3:19 am | by Mary Clare Jalonick - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

Food companies and restaurants could soon face government pressure to make their foods less salty — a long-awaited federal effort to try to prevent thousands of deaths each year from heart disease and stroke. The Food and Drug Administration is preparing to issue voluntary guidelines asking the food industry to lower sodium levels.

Breaking News: Genes Determine Betting Behavior

June 16, 2014 3:00 pm | News | Comments

Investors and gamblers take note: your betting decisions and strategy are determined, in part, by your genes. Researchers have shown that betting decisions are influenced by the specific variants of dopamine-regulating genes in a person's brain. 

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Scientists Take 'Tubular' Journey Through Brain Cells

June 16, 2014 2:38 pm | Videos | Comments

In a new study, scientists took a molecular-level journey into microtubules, the hollow cylinders inside brain cells that act as skeletons and internal highways. They watched how a protein called tubulin acetyltransferase (TAT) labels the inside of microtubules.

Severe Scoliosis Linked to Rare Gene Mutations

June 16, 2014 2:29 pm | News | Comments

Children with rare mutations in two genes are about four times more likely to develop severe scoliosis than their peers with normal versions of the genes, scientists have found.                      

Lipids Can Help Fight Leukemia

June 16, 2014 2:23 pm | News | Comments

A new study shows that a tumor-associated lipid stimulates specific T cells, which efficiently kill leukemia cells both in vitro and in animal models.                             

Researchers Chart Cellular Complexity of Brain Tumors

June 16, 2014 2:20 pm | News | Comments

Scientists from the Broad Institute and Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) have conducted a first-of-its-kind study that characterizes the cellular diversity within glioblastoma tumors from patients. The study, which looked at the expression of thousands of genes in individual cells from patient tumors, revealed that the cellular makeup of each tumor is more heterogeneous than previously suspected.

Burst of Mutations During Initial Infection Allows Bacteria To Evade Human Immune Response

June 16, 2014 2:10 pm | News | Comments

Bacteria that cause ulcers in humans undergo accelerated evolution during the initial stages of infection, allowing them to evade the immune system, according to new research. The study shows, for the first time, and in real-time, the interplay between the human immune system and invading bacteria that allows the bacteria to counter the immune response by quickly evolving.

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Discovery May Lead to Improvements in Diagnosing, Treating Alzheimer's Disease

June 16, 2014 1:51 pm | News | Comments

A new drug target to fight Alzheimer's disease has been discovered by a research team led by Gong Chen, a professor of biology and the Verne M. Willaman Chair in Life Sciences at Penn State. The discovery also has potential for development as a novel diagnostic tool for Alzheimer's disease.

'Bionic Pancreas' Outperforms Insulin Pump

June 15, 2014 9:14 pm | by Marilynn Marchione - AP Chief Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

Scientists have made big progress on a "bionic pancreas" to free some people with diabetes from the daily ordeal of managing their disease. A wearable, experimental device passed a real-world test, constantly monitoring blood sugar and automatically giving insulin or a sugar-boosting drug as eeded, doctors said.

Synchronized Brain Waves Enable Rapid Learning

June 13, 2014 12:58 pm | News | Comments

The human mind can rapidly absorb and analyze new information as it flits from thought to thought. These quickly changing brain states may be encoded by synchronization of brain waves across different brain regions, according to a new study.   

Female Hormones May Contribute to Male Obesity

June 13, 2014 12:45 pm | News | Comments

An imbalance of female sex hormones among men in Western nations may be contributing to high levels of male obesity, according to new research. The study suggest that obesity among Western men could be linked with exposure to substances containing the female sex hormone estrogen.

ADHD Mothers More Likely to Have Children with ADHD, Autism

June 13, 2014 12:29 pm | News | Comments

A study breaks new ground in the understanding of the link between parents with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and their children with ADHD or autism spectrum disorder (ASD).                  

Copper Compound Extends ALS Lifespan in Mice

June 13, 2014 12:08 pm | News | Comments

Researchers have determined that a copper compound known for decades may form the basis for a therapy for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), or Lou Gehrig’s disease.                       

Breaking News: Low Vitamin D May Up Premature Death Risk

June 12, 2014 4:00 pm | News | Comments

Researchers have found that persons with lower blood levels of vitamin D were twice as likely to die prematurely as people with higher blood levels of vitamin D.                         

Dormant Viruses Re-emerge in Patients with Lingering Sepsis

June 12, 2014 2:35 pm | News | Comments

A provocative new study links prolonged episodes of sepsis— a life-threatening infection and leading cause of death in hospitals— to the reactivation of otherwise dormant viruses in the body.                  

Immune Response Affects Sleep, Memory

June 12, 2014 2:29 pm | News | Comments

Fighting off illness- rather than the illness itself- causes sleep deprivation and affects memory, a new study has found. The study, carried out in flies, found that sickness induced insomnia is quite common.            

Embryonic Stem Cells a Promising Treatment for MS

June 12, 2014 2:22 pm | News | Comments

Scientists have identified a novel approach to treating multiple sclerosis (MS) using human embryonic stem cells, offering a promising new therapy for more than 2.3 million people suffering from the debilitating disease.          

Enzyme Reduces Gluten-induced Injury in Celiac Disease

June 12, 2014 2:14 pm | News | Comments

The gluten-specific enzyme ALV003 reduces exposure to gluten and gluten’s potential harm in individuals suffering who have celiac disease, according to a new study.                         

Zebrafish Yield Insights into Treating Heart Disease

June 12, 2014 1:53 pm | News | Comments

Using a zebrafish model, investigators have identified a drug compound that appears to reverse arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy (ACM), a hereditary disease and leading cause of sudden death in young people.             

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