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Biology Made Simpler with "Clear" Tissues

August 6, 2014 1:22 pm | News | Comments

In general, our knowledge of biology—and much of science in general—is limited by our ability to actually see things. Researchers who study developmental problems and disease, in particular, are often limited by their inability to look inside an organism to figure out exactly what went wrong and when. Now, thanks to techniques developed at Caltech, scientists can see through tissues, organs, and even an entire body. 

Scientists Uncover New Clues to Repairing Injured Spinal Cord

August 6, 2014 1:19 pm | News | Comments

Frogs, dogs, whales, snails can all do it, but humans and primates can't. Regrow nerves after an injury, that is— while many animals have this ability, humans don't. But now, new research suggests that a small molecule may be able to convince damaged nerves to grow and effectively rewire circuits.

Some Saturated Fatty Acids May Carry Bigger Risk Than Others

August 6, 2014 1:08 pm | News | Comments

The relationship between saturated fat and type 2 diabetes may be more complex than previously thought, according a study that claims saturated fatty acids can be associated with both an increased and decreased risk of developing the disease, depending on the type of fatty acids present in the blood.

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Lasers, Nanotubes Help to Look Inside Living Brains

August 6, 2014 12:40 pm | News | Comments

A team of scientists has developed an entirely non-invasive technique that provides a view of blood flow in the brain. The tool could provide powerful insights into strokes and possibly Alzheimer's disease.             

Study Predicts Hepatitis C Will Become a Rare Disease in 22 Years

August 5, 2014 2:06 pm | News | Comments

Effective new drugs and screening would make hepatitis C a rare disease by 2036, according to a computer simulation conducted by The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center and the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health.

Obesity Paradox in Survival from Sepsis

August 5, 2014 1:51 pm | News | Comments

University of Michigan Health System researchers revealed an obesity paradox among older Americans suffering from sepsis. In a study of 1,404 Medicare beneficiaries, heavier patients were more likely to survive the life-threatening infection that can lead to a stay in a hospital’s intensive care unit.

Clues to the Aging of Tendons Unlocked

August 5, 2014 1:33 pm | News | Comments

University of Liverpool scientists have examined the mechanisms that cause ageing in the tendons of horses, opening up the possibility of better treatment for humans. It has been understood for many years that tendons are highly prone to injury and that this likelihood increases as they age.  Why this happens, is currently poorly understood.

DNA Modifications Predict Brain’s Threat Response

August 4, 2014 1:01 pm | News | Comments

The tiny addition of a chemical mark atop a gene that is well known for its involvement in clinical depression and posttraumatic stress disorder can affect the way a person’s brain responds to threats, according to a new study.       

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Chili Pepper Chemical May Inhibit Gut Tumors

August 4, 2014 12:35 pm | News | Comments

Researchers report that dietary capsaicin– the active ingredient in chili peppers– produces chronic activation of a receptor on cells lining the intestines of mice, triggering a reaction that ultimately reduces the risk of colorectal tumors.   

Small RNAs in Blood May Reveal Heart Injury

August 4, 2014 12:07 pm | News | Comments

New research suggests that microRNAs may be able to relay valuable information about damage to the heart: Scientists have linked an increase in certain microRNAs circulating in the blood with injury to cardiac muscle.          

Did Lower Testosterone Help Civilize Humanity?

August 4, 2014 11:46 am | News | Comments

A study of 1,400 ancient and modern human skulls suggests that a reduction in testosterone hormone levels accompanied the development of cooperation, complex communication and modern culture some 50,000 years ago.           

African Plant May Be Possible Treatment for Aging Brain

August 4, 2014 11:22 am | News | Comments

Scientists have discovered that a compound isolated from the plant protects cells from altered molecular pathways linked to Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and the neurodegeneration that often follows a stroke.              

Toledo Mayor Lifts Water Ban

August 4, 2014 10:22 am | by John Seewer - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

A water ban that had hundreds of thousands of people in Ohio and Michigan scrambling for drinking water has been lifted, Toledo's mayor announced Monday.                           

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Ebola Vaccine Not Far Away

August 4, 2014 9:22 am | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

The nation's top infectious disease official says there's hope that a vaccine against Ebola will be available as early as next July. Dr. Anthony Fauci of the National Institutes of Health says such a preventive vaccine has been successfully tested with monkeys.

Mosaicism: Study Clarifies Parents as Source of New Mutations

July 31, 2014 3:36 pm | News | Comments

Scientists have long speculated that mosaicism plays a bigger role in the transmission of rare disease mutations than is currently known. Now, a study sheds new light on the frequency of mosaicism in genomic disorders and its influence on recurrence risk.

Engineering a Protein to Prevent Brain Damage from Toxic Agents

July 31, 2014 3:21 pm | News | Comments

Research at New York University is paving the way for a breakthrough that may prevent brain damage in civilians and military troops exposed to poisonous chemicals—particularly those in pesticides and chemical weapons. The research outlines the advancement in detoxifying organophosphates, which are compounds commonly used in pesticides and warfare agents.

New Way to Generate Insulin-producing Cells in Diabetes

July 31, 2014 3:20 pm | Videos | Comments

A new study has found that a peptide called caerulein can convert existing cells in the pancreas into those cells destroyed in type 1 diabetes-insulin-producing beta cells.                       

Molecule Enhances Copper’s Lethal Punch Against Microbes

July 31, 2014 3:11 pm | News | Comments

Harnessing a natural process in the body that pumps lethal doses of copper to fungi and bacteria shows promise as a new way to kill infectious microbes, a team of scientists report.                   

Strict Genomic Partitioning by Biological Clock Separates Key Metabolic Functions

July 31, 2014 3:10 pm | News | Comments

Much of the liver’s metabolic function is governed by circadian rhythms—our own body clock—and UC Irvine researchers have now found two independent mechanisms by which this occurs. The study reveals new information about the body clock’s sway over metabolism and points the way to more focused drug treatments for liver disease and such metabolic disorders as obesity and diabetes.

How Is Depression Related to Dementia?

July 31, 2014 3:05 pm | News | Comments

A new study gives insight into the relationship between depression and dementia. The current study, which involved 1,764 people from the Religious Orders Study and the Rush Memory and Aging Project, indicates that the association of depression with dementia is independent of dementia-related brain changes.

Pesticide DDT Linked to Slow Metabolism, Obesity, and Diabetes

July 31, 2014 2:43 pm | News | Comments

Exposure of pregnant mice to the pesticide DDT is linked to an increased risk of obesity, diabetes, high cholesterol, and related conditions in female offspring later in life, according to a study led by the University of California, Davis.

FDA to Start Regulating Lab-developed Tests

July 31, 2014 12:24 pm | by Matthew Perron - AP Health Writer - The Associated Press | News | Comments

The Food and Drug Administration says it will begin regulating laboratory-developed tests, a growing class of medical diagnostics that have never before been subject to federal oversight.                  

Drug Target Identified for Common Childhood Blood Cancer

July 31, 2014 12:00 pm | News | Comments

In what is believed to be the largest genetic analysis of what triggers and propels progression of tumor growth in a common childhood blood cancer, researchers report that they have identified a possible new drug target for treating the disease. 

Scientists Zoom In and Out as Brain Processes Sound

July 31, 2014 12:00 pm | News | Comments

Researchers have mapped the sound-processing part of the mouse brain in a way that keeps both the proverbial forest and the trees in view. Their technique allows zooming in and out on views of brain activity within mice, and it enabled the team to watch brain cells light up as mice “called” to each other.

Dissolvable Fabric Loaded with Medicine Might Offer Faster Protection Against HIV

July 31, 2014 9:27 am | News | Comments

University of Washington bioengineers have discovered a potentially faster way to deliver a topical drug that protects women from contracting HIV. Their method spins the drug into silk-like fibers that quickly dissolve when in contact with moisture, releasing higher doses of the drug than possible with other topical materials such as gels or creams.

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