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Molecular Mechanism Behind Health Benefits of Dietary Restriction Identified

December 26, 2014 9:36 am | by Harvard School of Public Health | News | Comments

A new study led by Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) researchers identifies a key molecular mechanism behind the health benefits of dietary restriction, or reduced food intake without malnutrition. Also known as calorie restriction, dietary restriction is best known for its ability to slow aging in laboratory animals.

Existing Drug May Prevent Foggy 'Old Age' Brain

December 26, 2014 9:27 am | by Rockefeller University | News | Comments

Forgetfulness, it turns out, is all in the head. Scientists have shown that fading memory and clouding judgment, the type that comes with advancing age, show up as lost and altered connections between neurons in the brain. But new experiments suggest an existing drug, known as riluzole and already on the market as a treatment for ALS, may help prevent these changes.

Scientists Create Precursor to Human Egg and Sperm

December 26, 2014 9:24 am | by University of Cambridge | News | Comments

Scientists have created primordial germ cells – cells that will go on to become egg and sperm – using human embryonic stem cells.                      

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Bacteria 'Factories' Churn Out Valuable Chemicals

December 26, 2014 9:12 am | by Kat J. McAlpine, Harvard Gazette | News | Comments

A team of researchers has made big strides toward a future in which the predominant chemical factories of the world are colonies of genetically engineered bacteria.                

Culture Influences Incidence of Depression

December 24, 2014 9:45 am | News | Comments

Culture influences the link between emotion and depression, according to new research into depression in developing countries.                                                                   

Scientists ID Rare Cancer's Genetic Pathways

December 24, 2014 9:41 am | News | Comments

An international research team, including four Simon Fraser University scientists, has identified the "mutational landscape" of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC), a rare, highly fatal form of liver cancer that disproportionately affects people in Asian countries.

Whole-Genome Sequencing Can Identify Cancer-Related Mutations

December 24, 2014 9:35 am | News | Comments

UT Southwestern Medical Center cancer researchers have demonstrated that whole-genome sequencing can be used to identify patients' risk for hereditary cancer, which can potentially lead to improvements in cancer prevention, diagnosis, and care.

Past Shows Fragile Bones Result From Physical Inactivity

December 22, 2014 4:32 pm | News | Comments

Latest analysis of prehistoric bones show there is no anatomical reason why a person born today could not develop the skeletal strength of a prehistoric forager or a modern orangutan. Findings support the idea that activity throughout life is the key to building bone strength and preventing osteoporosis risk in later years, say researchers.

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New Technology Makes Tissues, Someday Makes Organs

December 22, 2014 4:31 pm | by Brown University | News | Comments

A new instrument could someday build replacement human organs the way electronics are assembled today: with precise picking and placing of parts.                   

Bacteria in Gut May Depend More on Diet than Genes

December 22, 2014 10:49 am | News | Comments

Genes are important, but diet may be even more important in determining the relative abundance of the hundreds of health-shaping bacterial species comprising an individual’s gut microbiota, according to UC San Francisco scientists whose latest mouse experiments to probe this nature-versus-nurture balance were published online in Cell Host and Microbe.

Meet The Newest Surgeon General

December 22, 2014 10:15 am | by Ryan Bushey, Associate Editor | Articles | Comments

President Obama's pick for the position turned out to be controversial.                                

Unable to Prove Claims, “Acid Bath” Stem Cell Researcher Tenders Resignation

December 19, 2014 10:16 am | by Cynthia Fox, Science Writer | Articles | Comments

A young scientist from Harvard University and the Riken Institute, who claimed to make extraordinary stem cells from ordinary cells with acid, has failed to repeat her work.                                  

UCLA to Help Biologists, Doctors Mine 'Big Data'

December 19, 2014 9:45 am | by Eryn Brown, UCLA | News | Comments

Millions upon millions of medical records and test results. Countless DNA sequences. Hard drives stuffed with images of all kinds - pictures of cells, scans of body parts. It's all part of the deluge of information often known as "big data," an ever-growing stockpile of digital material that scientists hope will reveal insights about biology and lead to improvements in medical care.  

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Obese Children’s Brains More Responsive to Sugar

December 12, 2014 9:34 am | News | Comments

A new study found that the brains of obese children literally light up differently when tasting sugar. This elevated sense of “food reward” could mean some children have brain circuitries that predispose them to crave more sugar throughout life. 

Creating ‘Genomic Origami’

December 12, 2014 9:05 am | Videos | Comments

In a triumph for cell biology, researchers have assembled the first high-resolution, 3-D maps of entire folded genomes and found a structural basis for gene regulation, a kind of “genomic origami” that allows the same genome to produce different types of cells.

Scientists Find Way to Boost Healthy Cells During Chemo

December 12, 2014 9:01 am | News | Comments

It’s well known that chemotherapy helps fight cancer. It’s also known that it wreaks havoc on normal, healthy cells. Scientists are closer to discovering a possible way to boost healthy cell production in cancer patients as they receive chemotherapy. 

Discovery May Explain Why We Gain Weight

December 12, 2014 8:57 am | News | Comments

Researchers believe they’re on track to solve the mystery of weight gain – and it has nothing to do with indulging in holiday eggnog. They discovered that a protein, Thy1, has a fundamental role in controlling whether a primitive cell decides to become a fat cell, making Thy1 a possible therapeutic target.

Shedding New Light on Relationship Between Personality, Health

December 12, 2014 8:53 am | News | Comments

Researchers have found new evidence that explains how some aspects of our personality may affect our health and wellbeing, supporting long-observed associations between aspects of human character, physical health and longevity.       

Alcohol Interferes with the Body's Ability to Regulate Sleep

December 11, 2014 8:30 am | News | Comments

Researchers have found that drinking alcohol to fall asleep interferes with sleep homeostasis, the body’s sleep-regulating mechanism.                                 

Testosterone May Contribute to Colon Cancer Tumor Growth

December 11, 2014 8:30 am | News | Comments

Researchers have found evidence suggesting that the male hormone testosterone may actually be a contributing factor in the formation of colon cancer tumors.                           

Meniscus Regenerated with 3-D-printed Implant

December 11, 2014 8:30 am | Videos | Comments

Researchers have devised a way to replace the knee’s protective lining, called the meniscus, using a personalized 3-D-printed implant, or scaffold, infused with human growth factors that prompt the body to regenerate the lining on its own.    

Brain Inflammation a Hallmark of Autism

December 11, 2014 8:30 am | News | Comments

While many different combinations of genetic traits can cause autism, brains affected by autism share a pattern of ramped-up immune responses, an analysis of data from autopsied human brains revealed.               

Ebola Fighters Named Time Person of the Year

December 11, 2014 8:30 am | by Kiley Armstrong - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

Doctors, nurses and others fighting Ebola through "tireless acts of courage and mercy" have been named Time's 2014 Person of the Year, the magazine announced Wednesday.                       

Viewing Your Genome on a Blackberry Passport

December 10, 2014 1:15 pm | Videos | Comments

One of the recurring themes of the 2014 Forbes Healthcare Summit was that smartphones and mobile apps would play a larger role in the industry. However, the safety and security of these platforms are being debated. Nanthealth’s CEO Dr. Patrick Soon-Shiong feels he may have a solution.

New ‘Electronic Skin’ for Prosthetics, Robotics

December 10, 2014 12:57 pm | News | Comments

For the first time, scientists report the development of a stretchable “electronic skin” closely modeled after our own that can detect not just pressure, but also what direction it’s coming from.               

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