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Common Gene Variants Account for Most Genetic Risk for Autism

July 21, 2014 11:26 am | News | Comments

Most of the genetic risk for autism comes from versions of genes that are common in the population rather than from rare variants or spontaneous glitches, researchers have found. Heritability also outweighed other risk factors in this largest study of its kind to date.

New Findings Show Early Seeding of HIV Viral Reservoir

July 21, 2014 11:13 am | News | Comments

A research team has demonstrated that the viral reservoir of HIV-1 infection is established strikingly early after intrarectal simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection of rhesus monkeys and before detectable viremia.         

Scientists Find New Clues to Brain’s Wiring

July 18, 2014 2:14 pm | News | Comments

New research provides an intriguing glimpse into the processes that establish connections between nerve cells in the brain. These synapses allow nerve cells to transmit and process information involved in thinking and moving the body.     

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Managing Ecosystems via Genomics

July 18, 2014 2:11 pm | News | Comments

A cross-disciplinary team is calling for public discussion about a potential new way to solve longstanding global ecological problems by using an emerging technology called “gene drives.” The advance could potentially lead to powerful new ways of combating malaria and other insect-borne diseases.

Gene Variation May Modify Cardiovascular Benefit of Aspirin

July 18, 2014 1:01 pm | News | Comments

A daily low-dose aspirin is widely prescribed for the prevention of cardiovascular disease. Now, a new study suggests that common genetic variation may modify the cardiovascular benefit of aspirin.                

Researchers Uncover New Cancer Cell Vulnerability

July 18, 2014 12:52 pm | News | Comments

Researchers have uncovered a genetic vulnerability of cancer cells that express telomerase— an enzyme that drives their unchecked growth— and showed that telomerase-expressing cells depend upon a gene named p21 for their survival.      

One Injection Stops Diabetes in Its Tracks

July 17, 2014 11:03 am | Videos | Comments

In mice with diet-induced diabetes, the equivalent of type 2 diabetes in humans, a single injection of the protein FGF1 is enough to restore blood sugar levels to a healthy range for more than two days, according to a new study.       

How Cannabis Causes Paranoia

July 17, 2014 10:45 am | News | Comments

The largest study of the effects of the main ingredient of cannabis has shown definitively that it can cause short-term paranoia. The research also, for the first time, identifies psychological factors that can lead to feelings of paranoia in people who take cannabis.

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Scientists Find Way to Trap, Kill Malaria Parasite

July 17, 2014 10:20 am | News | Comments

Scientists may be able to entomb the malaria parasite in a prison of its own making, researchers at are reporting. The malaria parasite is among the world’s deadliest pathogens.                     

Bubble Wrap Serves as Sheet of Tiny Test Tubes in Resource-limited Regions

July 16, 2014 2:21 pm | News | Comments

Popping the blisters on the bubble wrap might be the most enjoyable thing about moving. But now, scientists propose a more productive way to reuse the popular packing material—as a sheet of small, test tube-like containers for medical and environmental samples.

Taking B Vitamins Won’t Prevent Alzheimer’s

July 16, 2014 11:31 am | News | Comments

Taking B vitamins doesn't slow mental decline as we age, nor is it likely to prevent Alzheimer's disease, conclude researchers who have assembled all the best clinical trial data involving 22,000 people to offer a final answer on this debate.   

Making People Smarter Through Brain Stimulation

July 16, 2014 11:10 am | News | Comments

Brain stimulation used to be just a cool idea in science fiction movies, novels and other hard to believe tales when human subjects were stimulated using electrical currents and achieved near super-human feats. Now, brain stimulation is a step closer to becoming a possible reality.

Protein's 'Hands' Enable Bacteria to Establish Infection

July 16, 2014 10:01 am | News | Comments

When it comes to infecting humans and animals, bacteria need a helping hand. Biochemists have found the helping hand: groups of tiny protein loops on the surface of cells.                       

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Breaking News: Mutant Worms Can’t Get Drunk

July 16, 2014 8:30 am | News | Comments

Neuroscientists have generated mutant worms that do not get intoxicated by alcohol, a result that could lead to new drugs to treat the symptoms of people going through alcohol withdrawal.                   

New Brain Protein Tied to Alzheimer's Disease

July 16, 2014 3:20 am | by Marilynn Marchione - AP Chief Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

Scientists have linked a new protein to Alzheimer's disease, different from the amyloid and tau that make up the sticky brain plaques and tangles long known to be its hallmarks.                      

One for the Aged

July 15, 2014 2:32 pm | by Skip Derra | Articles | Comments

What we currently know about aging is not highly specific; our cells divide many times throughout our lives and eventually cause organs and our bodies to age, break down and fail. New research, however, suggests that how we age might depend on cellular interactions that we inherit from our ancestors, accumulating throughout many generations.

Study Pinpoints Damage Alcohol Causes to the Brain

July 15, 2014 12:55 pm | News | Comments

New research has identified, for the first time, the structural damage at a molecular level that excessive alcohol abuse causes to the brain. The study detected the loss and modification of several key cellular proteins in the brains of alcoholics.

Proof: Parkinson's Enhances Creativity

July 15, 2014 12:11 pm | News | Comments

Two years ago, the exceptional creativity of Parkinson's patients was demonstrated in a review for Behavioral Neuroscience. Now, a new empirical study definitively demonstrates that Parkinson's patients are more creative than their healthy peers.

One in Three Alzheimer’s Cases Potentially Preventable, Study Says

July 14, 2014 12:02 pm | News | Comments

A third of Alzheimer’s disease cases worldwide can be attributed to risk factors that can be potentially modified, such as lack of education and physical inactivity, according to new research.                 

When Good Gut Bacteria Get Sick

July 14, 2014 11:46 am | News | Comments

Being sick due to an infection can make us feel lousy. But what must the ecosystem of bacteria, or microbiota, colonizing our guts be going through when hit with infection? A new study has utilized unique computational models to show how infection can affect bacteria that naturally live in our intestines.

Aronia Berry Gaining Foothold in U.S.

July 14, 2014 8:20 am | by Margery A. Beck - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

A new fruit that research says packs more antioxidants than popular "superfoods" like blueberries, acai berries and goji berries is establishing itself in the aisles of mainstream grocery stores, showing up in everything from juices to powdered supplements to baby food.

Got a Rash? iPad, Other Devices Might be the Cause

July 14, 2014 12:20 am | by Lindsey Tanner - AP Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

Unexplained rash? Check your iPad. It turns out the popular tablet computer may contain nickel, one of the most common allergy-inducing metals. Recent reports in medical journals detail nickel allergies from a variety of personal electronic devices, including laptops and cellphones.

Climate Change May Bring More Kidney Stones

July 11, 2014 1:57 pm | Videos | Comments

As daily temperatures increase, so does the number of patients seeking treatment for kidney stones. In a study that may both reflect and foretell a warming planet’s impact on human health, a research team found a link between hot days and kidney stones in 60,000 patients in several U.S. cities with varying climates.

Omega 3 Fatty Acids Lessen Severity of Osteoarthritis in Mice

July 11, 2014 1:06 pm | News | Comments

Mice consuming a supplement of omega 3 fatty acids had healthier joints than those fed diets high in saturated fats and omega 6 fatty acids, according to researchers.                        

Gene Therapy Brings ALS Cure One Step Closer

July 11, 2014 12:44 pm | News | Comments

Researchers have moved one step closer to a gene therapy that could silence the faulty SOD1 gene responsible for triggering a form of motor neuron disease also known as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS).             

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