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Key Role of Language Gene Identified

September 16, 2014 1:18 pm | News | Comments

Neuroscientists have found that a gene mutation that arose more than half a million years ago may be key to humans’ unique ability to produce and understand speech.                         

Newly Spotted Genetic Variants Increase Diabetes Risk

September 16, 2014 1:13 pm | News | Comments

Researchers have identified nine genetic variants that dramatically increase the risk of developing type 2 diabetes, adding to our knowledge of the disease’s underpinnings and providing a glimpse of its vast genetic diversity.       

UN: Nearly $1B Needed to Stop Ebola

September 16, 2014 11:36 am | by John Heilprin and Krista Larson - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

The number of Ebola cases in West Africa could start doubling every three weeks and it could end up costing nearly $1 billion to contain the crisis, the World Health Organization warned Tuesday.                

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Jacobsen Syndrome, Autism Linked

September 15, 2014 1:28 pm | News | Comments

A rare genetic disorder known as Jacobsen syndrome has been linked with autism, according to a recent joint investigation by researchers. In addition to suggesting better treatment options for people with Jacobsen syndrome, the finding also offers more clues into the genetic underpinnings of autism.

'Biospleen' is a Blood Cleanser for Sepsis

September 15, 2014 1:21 pm | News | Comments

Things can go downhill fast when a patient has sepsis, a life-threatening condition in which bacteria or fungi multiply in the blood—often too fast for antibiotics to help. A new device inspired by the human spleen may radically transform the way doctors treat sepsis.

Neural Compensation Found in People With Alzheimer’s-related Protein

September 15, 2014 12:48 pm | News | Comments

The human brain is capable of a neural workaround that compensates for the buildup of beta-amyloid, a destructive protein associated with Alzheimer’s disease, according to a new study.                   

U.S. Works to Step Up Ebola Aid, But is it Enough?

September 15, 2014 3:35 am | by Lauran Neergaard - AP Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

The American strategy on Ebola is two-pronged: Step up desperately needed aid to West Africa and, in an unusual step, train U.S. doctors and nurses for volunteer duty in the outbreak zone.                 

Kids' Poisonings Linked to Anti-addiction Medicine

September 15, 2014 12:34 am | by Lindsey Tanner - AP Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

An anti-addiction drug used to fight the nation's heroin and painkiller abuse epidemics poses a threat to young children who accidentally swallow relatives' prescriptions, a federal study says. Some children have died.          

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BST This Week #15: Bees May be Key to Antibiotic Alternatives

September 12, 2014 8:30 am | Videos | Comments

On this episode of Bioscience Technology This Week, Christina Jakubowski explores the role that bees may play in the search for antibiotic alternatives. Our second story focuses on how increased carbon dioxide levels in water can rob sharks of their ability to sense the smell of food.

Two Anti-Ebola Vaccines in Historic Race

September 11, 2014 3:38 pm | by Cynthia Fox | Articles | Comments

One of the most rapidly fast-tracked vaccines in history— an anti-Ebola “ChAd3” vaccine— just started clinical trial in humans, and may be done as soon as November. But a second fast-tracked anti-Ebola vaccine— called an “rVSV” vaccine— is hot on its heels.

Gut Microbes Determine How Well Flu Vaccine Works

September 11, 2014 3:34 pm | News | Comments

Mice treated with antibiotics to remove most of their intestinal bacteria or raised under sterile conditions have impaired antibody responses to seasonal influenza vaccination, researchers have found.               

Neurochemical Imbalance Discovered in Schizophrenia

September 11, 2014 3:28 pm | News | Comments

Using human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs), researchers have discovered that neurons from patients with schizophrenia secrete higher amounts of three neurotransmitters broadly implicated in a range of psychiatric disorders.     

Using Antibiotics to Help Heart Problems

September 11, 2014 12:17 pm | News | Comments

A research team is looking at whether an antibiotic has the potential to prevent or treat irregular heartbeats brought on by other medicines, thanks to a grant from national charity in the UK.                 

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New Evidence Shows Sleep Apnea Hurts Your Brain

September 11, 2014 12:08 pm | News | Comments

Employing a measure rarely used in sleep apnea studies, researchers uncovered evidence of what may be damaging the brain in people with the sleep disorder— weaker brain blood flow.                     

Ebola’s Ripple Effects

September 11, 2014 12:04 pm | Videos | Comments

The race to stamp out West Africa’s Ebola epidemic is not just about saving lives. It’s also about stemming an assault on society that could include food shortages and mass migration, morphing from a medical emergency into a broad humanitarian crisis.

Man Pleads Not Guilty in Tainted Steroid Case

September 11, 2014 11:35 am | by Denise Lavoie - AP Legal Affairs Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

A pharmacist who worked for a Massachusetts company blamed for a 2012 deadly nationwide meningitis outbreak has pleaded not guilty. Glenn Adam Chin entered his plea to a mail fraud charge at a brief hearing Thursday in federal court in Boston.  

UCSF, Google Earth Engine Making Maps to Predict Malaria

September 11, 2014 11:13 am | News | Comments

Researchers are working to create an online platform that health workers around the world can use to predict where malaria is likely to be transmitted using data on Google Earth Engine. Read more...               

23andMe Navigates Health Regulation

September 11, 2014 10:35 am | by Matthew Perrone - AP Health Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

Last November, the Food and Drug Administration ordered the company to stop marketing its personalized health reports, which purported to tell customers if they were genetically predisposed to more than 250 diseases and medical conditions. Now, 23andMe is working to win FDA clearance for its health tests one at a time.

Breaking News: Blood Type May Affect Memory

September 11, 2014 8:30 am | News | Comments

People with blood type AB were 82 percent more likely to develop the thinking and memory problems than people with other blood types, according to a new study.                        

Eating Habits, Body Fat Related to Brain Differences

September 10, 2014 12:00 pm | News | Comments

People who are obese may be more susceptible to environmental food cues than their lean counterparts due to differences in brain chemistry that make eating more habitual and less rewarding, according to a new study.          

BST This Week #14: IPF Cases Linked to Asbestos Exposure

September 10, 2014 12:00 pm | Videos | Comments

On this episode of Bioscience Technology This Week, Christina Jakubowski discusses a new study that shows a link between idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis cases and asbestos exposure. Our second story showcases how immune cells use two critical receptors to clear dead cells from the body.

Long-term Use of Anxiety, Sleep Meds Linked to Alzheimer's

September 10, 2014 11:41 am | News | Comments

Taking benzodiazepines (widely prescribed drugs to treat anxiety and insomnia) is associated with an increased risk of developing Alzheimer's disease, particularly for long-term users, suggests a new study.             

New Glaucoma Cause Discovered

September 10, 2014 11:36 am | News | Comments

Scientists have discovered a novel cause of glaucoma in an animal model, and related to their findings, are now developing an eye drop aimed at curing the disease. They believe their findings will be important to human glaucoma.       

Brain Structure May Predict Risky Behavior

September 10, 2014 11:30 am | News | Comments

Some people avoid risks at all costs, while others will put their wealth, health, and safety at risk without a thought. Researchers have found that the volume of the parietal cortex in the brain could predict where people fall on the risk-taking spectrum.

‘Electronic Skin’ Could Improve Early Breast Cancer Detection

September 10, 2014 11:27 am | News | Comments

For detecting cancer, manual breast exams seem low-tech compared to other methods such as MRI. But scientists are now developing an “electronic skin” that “feels” and images small lumps that fingers can miss.            

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