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Could Our Brains Instruct Our Bodies to Burn More Fat?

January 20, 2015 10:14 am | by Monash University | News | Comments

By uncovering the action of two naturally occurring hormones, scientists may have discovered a way to assist in the shedding of excess fat.                                                     

New Way to Model Sickle Cell Behavior

January 20, 2015 10:07 am | News | Comments

Patients with sickle cell disease often suffer from painful attacks known as vaso-occlusive crises, during which their sickle-shaped blood cells get stuck in tiny capillaries, depriving tissues of needed oxygen. Blood transfusions can sometimes prevent such attacks, but there are currently no good ways to predict when a vaso-occlusive crisis, which can last for several days, is imminent.

Questions, Answers About Sri Lanka Mystery Kidney Disease

January 20, 2015 9:38 am | by Margie Mason, AP Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

A mystery kidney disease is killing Sri Lankan farmers. The first cases surfaced some two decades ago in the country's North Central province, the main rice-producing area. Since then, the disease has killed up to an estimated 20,000 people on the Indian Ocean island nation.

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Human Mode of Responding to HIV Vaccine Conserved from Monkeys

January 16, 2015 2:25 pm | by Duke Medicine | News | Comments

The antibody response from an HIV vaccine trial in Thailand was made possible by a genetic trait carried over in humans from an ancient ancestry with monkeys and apes.                

Vitamin D Protects Against Colorectal Cancer

January 16, 2015 2:03 pm | by Dana Farber Cancer Institute | News | Comments

A new study demonstrates that vitamin D can protect some people with colorectal cancer by perking up the immune system’s vigilance against tumor cells.                   

Measles Pops Up in Outbreak Linked to Disney Parks

January 16, 2015 1:57 pm | by Alicia Chang - AP Science Writer | News | Comments

The highly contagious respiratory illness was declared eliminated in the U.S. in 2000, but health officials have seen a surge of measles infections in the country in recent years.              

Scientists Find How Many Cancers May Evade Treatment

January 16, 2015 10:54 am | by University of Wisconsin-Madison | News | Comments

The drugs were designed to keep cancer cells at bay by preventing their growth, survival and spread. Yet, after clinical trials, they left scientists scratching their heads and drug developers watching their investments succumb to cancer’s latest triumph.

Tracking Physical Activity and Recovery from Spine Surgery

January 16, 2015 10:39 am | by Nora Dunne, Northwestern Medicine | News | Comments

When am I going to recover? It’s a common question from patients, yet a difficult one for physicians to answer. In an effort to better predict recovery over time for patients who undergo spine surgery, Northwestern Medicine investigators are monitoring physical activity using Fitbit trackers in an ongoing study.

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Depression, Behavioral Changes May Precede Memory Loss in Alzheimer's

January 16, 2015 10:09 am | by Washington University in St. Louis | News | Comments

Depression and behavioral changes may occur before memory declines in people who will go on to develop Alzheimer’s disease, according to new research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.                                  

Teasing Out Genes that Signal Heart Failure Risk

January 16, 2015 10:00 am | by Lauren Neergaard, AP Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

Scientists are unraveling a mystery behind a fairly common disease that leads to heart failure: Why do some people with a key mutated gene fall ill while others stay healthy? Researchers tested more than 5,200 people to tease apart when mutations really are harmful or are just bystanders. 

FDA Approves First-of-Kind Device to Treat Obesity

January 15, 2015 9:51 am | by FDA | News | Comments

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved the Maestro Rechargeable System for certain obese adults, the first weight loss treatment device that targets the nerve pathway between the brain and the stomach that controls feelings of hunger and fullness.  

Red-Hot Coverage for Study: “Cold Noses Cause Colds"

January 15, 2015 9:46 am | by Cynthia Fox, Science Writer | Articles | Comments

Colds can come from cold noses, according to a high-profile study in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS).                                          

Iron Overload Disease Causes Rapid Bacteria Growth

January 15, 2015 9:40 am | by UCLA | News | Comments

Every summer, the news reports on a bacterium called Vibrio vulnificus found in warm saltwater that causes people to get sick, or die, after they eat raw tainted shellfish or when an open wound comes in contact with seawater.                                      

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3-D Facial Imaging May Aid in Early Detection of Autism

January 14, 2015 4:18 pm | by University of Missouri | News | Comments

Early detection of autism in children is the key for treatments to be most effective and produce the best outcomes.                        

Studying Fetal Liver Fibrogenesis

January 14, 2015 4:07 pm | by Sarah Plumridge, Northwestern University | News | Comments

Fibrosis is a constant feature of all chronic liver diseases.                                 

California Unveils Strictest Rules on Pesticide

January 14, 2015 3:53 pm | by Scott Smith-Associated Press | News | Comments

The new regulations surpass standards required by U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.                             

First Contracting Human Muscle Grown in Lab

January 14, 2015 3:42 pm | by Duke University | News | Comments

The lab-grown tissue should soon allow researchers to test new drugs and study diseases in functioning human muscle outside of the human body.                    

Five Biotech Startups to Watch in 2015

January 13, 2015 5:02 pm | by Ryan Bushey, Associate Editor | Articles | Comments

These companies have an interesting year ahead of them.                                   

Ancient Fossils Reveal Risk of Parasitic Infections Due to Climate Change

January 13, 2015 4:00 pm | by University of Missouri | News | Comments

Biologists found indications of a greater risk of parasitic infection due to climate change in ancient mollusk fossils.                        

Genetic Predictor of Serious Brain Stroke Complications Discovered

January 13, 2015 3:50 pm | by University of Florida | News | Comments

Researchers have found a possible predictor for little understood -- but often disabling or even fatal -- stroke complications.                       

New Information on Chemicals Insects Use to Communicate and Survive

January 13, 2015 3:34 pm | by UC Riverside | News | Comments

Most insects are covered with a thin layer of hydrocarbon molecules as a waterproofing barrier.                            

Watching How Cells Interact

January 13, 2015 3:24 pm | by Anne Trafton, MIT | News | Comments

A new device offers a much more detailed picture of cellular communication.                               

Mucus Proteins May Control Asthma

January 13, 2015 3:16 pm | by Nora Dunne, Northwestern University | News | Comments

Scientists have revealed that sugars on a specific mucus protein can induce eosinophil death and help combat asthma.                        

Scientists Create Device for Extracting Tumor Cells from Blood

January 13, 2015 3:13 pm | by UCLA | News | Comments

When 2 milliliters of blood are run through the chip, the tumor cells stick to the nanowires like Velcro.                          

One-Size-Fits-All Approach Can Lead to Diabetes Over-Treatment

January 13, 2015 10:30 am | by Yale | News | Comments

Diabetes treatments have saved many lives, but in older patients with multiple medical conditions, aggressively controlling blood sugar with insulin and sulfonylurea drugs, could lead to over-treatment and hypoglycemia (low blood sugar), according to new research by Yale School of Medicine researchers.                          

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