Advertisement
Health
Subscribe to Health
View Sample

FREE Email Newsletter

New Gene Editing Method Shows Promising Results for Correcting Muscular Dystrophy

August 15, 2014 11:30 am | News | Comments

UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers successfully used a new gene editing method to correct a mutation that leads to Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) in a mouse model of the condition. Researchers used a technique called CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genome editing, which can precisely remove a mutation in DNA, allowing the body’s DNA repair mechanisms to replace it with a normal copy of the gene.

New Technology Offers Insight into Cholesterol

August 14, 2014 2:16 pm | News | Comments

With new advanced techniques developed by the Copenhagen Center for Glycomics at the University of Copenhagen it is possible to study cells in greater detail than ever before. The findings may, in the long term, improve the treatment of high cholesterol.

Autism, SPD Hit Different Brain Areas

August 14, 2014 11:10 am | by Cynthia Fox | Articles | Comments

Children with sensory processing disorder (SPD) have decreased white matter brain connections in sensory regions very different from those with autism, say researchers. Their study is the first to compare, and find critical differences in, brain connectivity in autism versus SPD versus controls.

Advertisement

Material Could Enhance Fast, Accurate DNA Sequencing

August 14, 2014 10:24 am | News | Comments

Gene-based personalized medicine has many possibilities for diagnosis and targeted therapy, but one big bottleneck: the expensive and time-consuming DNA-sequencing process. Now, researchers have found that nanopores in the material molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) could sequence DNA more accurately, quickly and inexpensively than anything yet available.

Injected Bacteria Shrink Tumors in Rats, Dogs, Humans

August 14, 2014 10:17 am | News | Comments

A modified version of the Clostridium novyi (C. novyi-NT) bacterium can produce a strong and precisely targeted anti-tumor response in rats, dogs and now humans, according to a new report.                 

Study Questions Need for Cutting Salt

August 13, 2014 5:18 pm | by Marilynn Marchione - AP Chief Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

A large international study questions the conventional wisdom that most people should cut back on salt, suggesting that the amount most folks consume is OK for heart health - and too little may be as bad as too much.         

Huntingtin Gene Crucial to Memory Development

August 13, 2014 11:50 am | News | Comments

It has been more than 20 years since scientists discovered that mutations in the gene huntingtin cause the devastating progressive neurological condition Huntington’s disease. Surprisingly little, however, has been known about the gene’s role in normal brain activity. Now, new research shows it plays a critical role in long-term memory.

‘Shape-Shifting’ Material Could Help Reconstruct Faces

August 13, 2014 11:16 am | News | Comments

Researchers are reporting that they have developed a “self-fitting” material that expands with warm salt water to precisely fill bone defects that occur as a result of injury, birth defect or surgery to remove a tumor.          

Advertisement

Prostate Cancer Diagnosis Improves with MRI Technology

August 13, 2014 11:03 am | Videos | Comments

Oncologists are melding magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technology with a traditional ultrasound prostate exam to create a three-dimensional map of the prostate that allows physicians to view growths that were previously undetectable.      

Sierra Leone: Another Top Doctor Dies from Ebola

August 13, 2014 9:21 am | by Clarence Roy-Macaulay and Maria Cheng - Associted Press - Associted Press | News | Comments

A leading physician in Sierra Leone's fight against Ebola has died from the disease, an official said Wednesday, as it emerged that another top doctor had been considered to receive an experimental drug but did not get it and later died.    

Biomarker Could Predict PTSD Risk

August 12, 2014 12:40 pm | News | Comments

Blood expression levels of genes targeted by the stress hormones called glucocorticoids could be a physical measure, or biomarker, of risk for developing Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), according to a new study.          

Gene Slows Bone Loss, Promotes Bone Formation

August 12, 2014 12:29 pm | News | Comments

A gene discovery brings scientists closer to developing therapeutic agents that could slow down bone loss and regenerate lost bone, which could provide relief for millions suffering from aging-related bone loss.           

Size Matters When Convincing Brain to Eat Healthy Foods

August 12, 2014 12:05 pm | Videos | Comments

Playing with the portions of good and not-so-good-for-you foods is better than trying to eliminate bad foods, according to a new study. The idea is to not give up entirely foods that provide pleasure but aren’t nutritious.         

Advertisement

Priest Dies of Ebola; UN Debates Treatment Ethics

August 12, 2014 8:21 am | by Maria Cheng and Ciaran Giles - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

A Spanish missionary priest being treated for Ebola died Tuesday in a Madrid hospital amid a worldwide debate over who should get experimental Ebola treatments. After holding a teleconference with medical experts around the world, the WHO declared it is ethical to use unproven Ebola drugs and vaccines in the current outbreak.

Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis: Hope, At Last

August 11, 2014 2:26 pm | by Cynthia Fox | Articles | Comments

There have been stunning “firsts” in research on idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), a mysterious disease that stiffens and stills the lungs, killing half its victims in three years. In May, results of Phase 3 clinical trials on the first two effective drugs for IPF were published in the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM). And in June, the first paper explaining IPF was published in Science Translational Medicine.

Scientists Unlock Key to Blood Vessel Formation

August 11, 2014 2:09 pm | News | Comments

Scientists from the University of Leeds have discovered a gene that plays a vital role in blood vessel formation, research which adds to our knowledge of how early life develops. The discovery could also lead to greater understanding of how to treat cardiovascular diseases and cancer.

Newly Discovered Heart Molecule Could Lead to Effective Treatment for Heart Failure

August 11, 2014 2:04 pm | News | Comments

Researchers have discovered a previously unknown cardiac molecule that could provide a key to treating, and preventing, heart failure. The newly discovered molecule provides the heart with a tool to block a protein that orchestrates genetic disruptions when the heart is subjected to stress, such as high blood pressure.

Like Cling Wrap, New Biomaterial Can Coat Burn Wounds and Block Infection

August 11, 2014 2:01 pm | News | Comments

Wrapping wound dressings around fingers and toes can be tricky, but for burn victims, guarding them against infection is critical. Today, scientists are reporting the development of novel, ultrathin coatings called nanosheets that can cling to the body’s most difficult-to-protect contours and keep bacteria at bay.

Solving a Sticky Problem with Fetal Surgery Using Glue Inspired by Sandcastle Worm

August 11, 2014 1:48 pm | News | Comments

In creating an adhesive patterned after glue produced by the lowly underwater sandcastle worm, researchers are reporting today that they may have solved the problem of premature births that sometimes result from fetal surgery. It also could open up numerous opportunities to safely perform more complex fetal surgeries in the future.

Making Cashews Safer for Those with Allergies

August 11, 2014 1:37 pm | News | Comments

For the millions of adults and children in the U.S. who have to shun nuts to avoid an allergic reaction, help could be on the way. Scientists are now developing a method to process cashews—and potentially other nuts—that could make them safer to eat for people who are allergic to them.

Wild Sheep Show Benefits of Putting Up with Parasites

August 8, 2014 12:47 pm | News | Comments

In the first evidence that natural selection favors an individual's infection tolerance, researchers from Princeton University and the University of Edinburgh have found that an animal's ability to endure an internal parasite strongly influences its reproductive success. The finding could provide the groundwork for boosting the resilience of humans and livestock to infection.

'Normal' Bacteria Vital for Keeping Intestinal Lining Intact

August 7, 2014 4:24 pm | by Einstein | News | Comments

Scientists at Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University have found that bacteria that aid in digestion help keep the intestinal lining intact. The findings could yield new therapies for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and a wide range of other disorders.

Bad Bite: A Tick Can Make You Allergic to Red Meat

August 7, 2014 1:27 pm | by Marilynn Marchione - AP Chief Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

A tick bite might make you a vegetarian, or at least make you swear off red meat. Doctors across the nation are seeing a surge of sudden meat allergies in people bitten by Lone Star ticks, which are found in the Southwest and eastern half of the U.S.

Low Vitamin D Ups Dementia Risk, Study Says

August 7, 2014 9:51 am | News | Comments

In the largest study of its kind, researchers suggests that in older people, not getting enough vitamin D may double the risk of developing dementia and Alzheimer’s disease.                      

FDA Warns of Infection-causing Tattoo Inks

August 7, 2014 3:23 am | by Mary Clare Jalonick - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

Thinking about getting inked? Check the bottle first. The Food and Drug Administration is warning tattoo parlors, their customers and those buying at-home tattoo kits that not all tattoo ink is safe.               

X
You may login with either your assigned username or your e-mail address.
The password field is case sensitive.
Loading