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Aging Can be Manipulated for Longer Lifespan

September 24, 2014 3:02 pm | News | Comments

Life expectancy, affected by numerous factors such as better nutrition and availability of vaccines, has increased. Around 150 years ago it was something like 40 years old, and 1,000 years ago about 25. But even as we increasingly reach what appear to be the limits of lifespan, there is likely still scope for even longer lifespans.

Tonsil Stem Cells May Help Repair Liver Damage

September 24, 2014 2:50 pm | News | Comments

The liver provides critical functions, such as ridding the body of toxins. Its failure can be deadly, and there are few options for fixing it. But scientists now report a way to potentially inject stem cells from tonsils to repair damaged livers without surgery.

Diabetes in Need of New Screening, Management Approach

September 24, 2014 2:39 pm | News | Comments

Doctors at three leading research institutions and the American Diabetes Association report that treating patients with prediabetes as if they had diabetes could help prevent or delay the most severe complications associated with this chronic disease.

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Alcohol Sensations Influenced by Genes

September 24, 2014 2:31 pm | News | Comments

How people perceive and taste alcohol depends on genetic factors, and that likely influences whether they "like" and consume alcoholic beverages, according to researchers.                       

Breaking News: Multitasking May Change Brain Structure

September 24, 2014 2:06 pm | News | Comments

Simultaneously using mobile phones, laptops and other media devices could be changing the structure of our brains, according to new research.                               

Red Cross Team Attacked While Burying Ebola Dead

September 24, 2014 9:36 am | by Boubacar Diallo - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

A Red Cross team was attacked while collecting bodies believed to be infected with Ebola in southeastern Guinea, the latest in a string of assaults that are hindering efforts to control West Africa's current outbreak.          

Grant Will Help Study Link Between Blueberries, Bone Health

September 23, 2014 2:42 pm | News | Comments

A $3.7 million grant will allow Purdue University researchers to study how blueberries reduce bone loss in postmenopausal women. The project begins Sept. 30 under a five-year grant from the National Institutes of Health's National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine.

Consumption of Fruits, Veggies May Keep the Blues Away

September 23, 2014 2:33 pm | News | Comments

A new study focused on mental well-being found that high and low mental well-being were consistently associated with an individual’s fruit and vegetable consumption.                          

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Lost Protein Could Prevent Hardening of the Arteries

September 23, 2014 2:23 pm | News | Comments

Researchers have found that when the protein matrix metalloproteinase-14 (MMP-14) is reduced or lost, white blood cells, known as macrophages, become good and could prevent hardening of the arteries, rupture and sudden death.        

Nanotubes Help Healing Hearts Keep the Beat

September 23, 2014 1:59 pm | Videos | Comments

Carbon nanotubes serve as bridges that allow electrical signals to pass unhindered through new pediatric heart-defect patches invented at Rice University and Texas Children’s Hospital.                    

Airway Muscle-on-a-chip Mimics Asthma

September 23, 2014 1:46 pm | News | Comments

Hope for healthier airways may be on the horizon thanks to a human airway muscle-on-a-chip that could be used to test new drugs because it accurately mimics the way smooth muscle contracts in the human airway, under normal circumstances and when exposed to asthma triggers.

Presence or Absence of Early Language Delay Alters Brain Anatomy in Autism

September 23, 2014 1:39 pm | News | Comments

Individual differences in early language development, and in later language functioning, are associated with changes in the anatomy of the brain in autism. A new study has found that a common characteristic of autism– language delay in early childhood– leaves a "signature" in the brain.

Ebola Cases Could Hit 1.4 Million By Mid-Jan.

September 23, 2014 11:32 am | by Maria Cheng - AP Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

New estimates by the World Health Organization and the U.S. health agency are warning that the number of Ebola cases could soar dramatically — the U.S. says up to 1.4 million by mid-January in two nations alone — unless efforts to curb the outbreak are significantly ramped up.

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Newborns Have Stronger Immunity Than First Thought

September 22, 2014 12:25 pm | News | Comments

Contrary to what was previously thought, newborn immune T cells may have the ability to trigger an inflammatory response to bacteria, according to a new study.                          

Scientists ID On/Off Switch for Aging Cells

September 22, 2014 12:08 pm | News | Comments

Scientists have discovered an on-and-off “switch” in cells that may hold the key to healthy aging. This switch points to a way to encourage healthy cells to keep dividing and generating, for example, new lung or liver tissue, even in old age.    

Blood Test May Help Determine Psychosis Risk

September 22, 2014 11:56 am | News | Comments

A new study reports preliminary results showing that a blood test, when used in psychiatric patients experiencing symptoms that are considered to be indicators of a high risk for psychosis, identifies those who later went on to develop psychosis. 

Western Diet Leads to Diminished Cognitive Performance

September 22, 2014 11:40 am | by Rob Payne, ScienceNetwork WA | News | Comments

Researchers found that participants with a western dietary pattern scored lower in cognitive tasks, particularly those involving reaction time/psychomotor function, visual attention, learning and memory.              

Streets Bustling After Sierra Leone Shutdown Ends

September 22, 2014 10:36 am | by Clarence Roy-Macaulay - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

A news conference to announce the results of a three-day nationwide shutdown designed to help stop the spread of Ebola has been postponed to give officials who fanned out across the country time to reach the capital.         

700 Babies Maybe Exposed to TB at Texas Hospital

September 19, 2014 9:35 pm | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

More than 700 infants may have been exposed to tuberculosis at an El Paso hospital over the past year by an employee recently diagnosed with the illness, health officials said Friday.                     

FDA Revises Food Safety Rules Due Next Year

September 19, 2014 5:35 pm | by Mary Clare Jalonick - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

The Food and Drug Administration on Friday revised sweeping food safety rules proposed last year after farmers complained that the regulations could hurt business.                         

New Method Developed to Detect Ebola

September 19, 2014 8:30 am | Videos | Comments

A group of international scientists have developed a new method to study Ebola virus in wildlife. The research describes the use of fecal samples from wild great apes to identify populations likely to have been exposed to the virus.     

White House Orders Plan for Antibiotic Resistance

September 19, 2014 8:30 am | by Mary Clare Jalonick - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

Signaling the seriousness of the threat posed by antibiotic-resistant germs, President Barack Obama on Thursday ordered the government to create a national plan to fight them by early 2015.                  

Sensing Neuronal Activity With Light

September 19, 2014 8:30 am | News | Comments

For years, neuroscientists have been trying to develop tools that would allow them to clearly view the brain's circuitry in action— from the first moment a neuron fires to the resulting behavior in a whole organism.          

Protein May Lower Blood Pressure

September 19, 2014 8:30 am | by Benjamin Plackett, Contributor, Inside Science News | News | Comments

A new study has shown that people who eat more protein- whether from plant or animal sources- tend to have a lower risk of hypertension, also known as high blood pressure.                       

Stem Cells Use 'First Aid Kits' to Repair Damage

September 19, 2014 8:30 am | News | Comments

Neural stem cells– master cells that can develop into any type of nerve cell– are able to generate mini “first aid kits” and transfer them to immune cells, according to a new study.                    

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