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New Patent May Advance Stem Cell Therapeutics

November 13, 2014 10:29 am | News | Comments

Ki-Bum Lee has developed patent-pending technology that may overcome one of the critical barriers to harnessing the full therapeutic potential of stem cells.                            

Artificial Retina Could Someday Help Restore Vision

November 13, 2014 10:18 am | News | Comments

The loss of eyesight, often caused by retinal degeneration, is a life-altering health issue for many people. A new development toward a prosthetic retina could help counter conditions that result from problems with this crucial part of the eye.   

'Supporting' Ear Cells Hold Potential in Hearing Loss

November 13, 2014 10:09 am | News | Comments

There’s a cast of characters deep inside your ears- many kinds of tiny cells working together to allow you to hear. Hair cells, the lead actors, play the crucial role. But new research shows that when it comes to restoring lost hearing ability, the spotlight may fall on some of the ear’s supporting actors.

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6 Health-improving Trends in Science

November 13, 2014 9:52 am | News | Comments

Researchers are collaborating and innovating in ways that are transforming health care as we know it. They're also looking ahead at the trends and influences that are reshaping and accelerating translational science.           

Gene Study Boosts Interest in Heart Drug

November 12, 2014 5:57 pm | by Marilynn Marchione - AP Chief Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

Scientists have discovered gene mutations that give people naturally lower cholesterol levels and cut their risk of heart disease in half. That discovery may have a big implication for a blockbuster heart drug.           

Altered Milk Protein Can Deliver AIDS Drug to Infants

November 12, 2014 8:30 am | News | Comments

A novel method of altering a protein in milk to bind with an antiretroviral drug promises to greatly improve treatment for infants and young children suffering from HIV/AIDS, according to new research.              

Revolutionary New Microscope: Real-time Movies of Molecules

November 12, 2014 8:30 am | by Cynthia Fox, Science Writer | Articles | Comments

A new microscope, using a new form of the much-hailed light sheet-based fluorescence microscopy (LSFM), makes visible— via stunning movies— countless biological processes once deemed utterly invisible: sub-cellular activity.       

Controlling Genes with Thoughts

November 12, 2014 8:30 am | News | Comments

Researchers have developed the first gene network to be operated via brainwaves. Depending on the user’s thoughts, it can produce various amounts of a desired molecule.                       

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Gene May Protect Against Typhoid Fever

November 12, 2014 8:30 am | News | Comments

People who carry a particular type of gene have natural resistance against typhoid fever according to new research. The study is the first large-scale, unbiased search for human genes that affect a person’s risk of typhoid.        

Enriched Environments Hold Promise for Brain Injury Patients

November 12, 2014 8:30 am | News | Comments

A new study from Tel Aviv University found that an "enriched environment"— specially enhanced surroundings— led to rehabilitation of mice following traumatic brain injury.                       

Eye’s Response to TV Helps ID Diseases

November 12, 2014 8:30 am | News | Comments

One of the leading causes of blindness worldwide could be detected by how our eyes respond to watching TV, according to a new study. The researchers found that they could identify eye diseases by looking at maps of people's eye movements while they watched a film.

Multiple Models Reveal New Genetic Links in Autism

November 12, 2014 8:30 am | News | Comments

With the help of mouse models, induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and the “tooth fairy,” researchers have implicated a new gene in idiopathic or non-syndromic autism.                        

How Cartilage Cells Sense Forceful Injury

November 11, 2014 12:30 pm | News | Comments

Scientists have come a step closer to understanding how cartilage senses injury-causing mechanical strain at the cellular level: a pair of channels that work together to cause cartilage cells to die off in droves.           

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The Brain’s 'Inner GPS' Gets Dismantled

November 11, 2014 12:22 pm | News | Comments

Imagine being able to recognize your car as your own but never being able to remember where you parked it. Researchers have induced this all-too-common human experience– or a close version of it– permanently in rats.           

Playing Action Video Games Can Boost Learning

November 11, 2014 11:26 am | News | Comments

A new study shows for the first time that playing action video games improves not just the skills taught in the game, but learning capabilities more generally.                          

Scientists Solve Mystery of ‘Frankenstein’ DNA

November 11, 2014 11:19 am | Videos | Comments

Scientists have uncovered how the massive DNA molecules that appear in some tumors are formed like Frankenstein’s monster, stitched together from other parts of the genome.                       

Initiative to Highlight Strong Links Between Sugar, Disease

November 11, 2014 11:04 am | News | Comments

Researchers have launched SugarScience, a groundbreaking research and education initiative designed to highlight the most authoritative scientific findings on added sugar and its impact on health.               

Long-term Marijuana Use Affects Brain Function, Structure

November 11, 2014 10:37 am | News | Comments

Researchers for the first time comprehensively describe existing abnormalities in brain function and structure of long-term marijuana users with multiple MRI techniques.                      

Ebola Health Lessons: A Wake-up Call

November 11, 2014 8:30 am | by Stephanie Guzowski, Editor, Drug Discovery & Development | Articles | Comments

After months of delayed, fragmented responses, the international medical community recognized Ebola as a threat to global health security. Here’s where the situation stands today as well as questions raised and lessons learned.        

Fighting HIV with Stem Cells and Cutting-edge Genetics

November 10, 2014 2:34 pm | by Cynthia Fox, Science Writer | Articles | Comments

“Berlin Patient” Timothy Brown was cured of HIV after he received stem cells from a naturally immune patient. His story inspired two companies to try and recreate that natural immunity in HIV patients using stem cells and cutting-edge gene-editing. Now Harvard has joined the race.

Bridging the Gap in Precision Medicine

November 10, 2014 2:22 pm | News | Comments

More than a decade after the completion of Human Genome Project, precision medicine has struggled with what it known as the "last mile." Despite major leaps in the field, the technical work needed to integrate genomic information into the day-to-day practice of medicine has lagged far behind.

DNA Sequencing Helps Spot Glaucoma Defects

November 10, 2014 2:03 pm | News | Comments

Scientists have sequenced the mitochondrial genome in glaucoma patients to help further understanding into the genetic basis for the disease. Glaucoma is a major cause of irreversible blindness, affecting more than 60 million people worldwide.  

The Power of the Power Nap

November 10, 2014 1:50 pm | News | Comments

For hibernating mammals, the pre-winter months are a race against time to accumulate enough energy reserves to last until spring. Offspring born late in the year have much less time to achieve this. New research shows that power-napping can help late-born garden dormice overcome these unfavorable odds.

Researchers ID First Steps in Pancreatic Cancer Formation

November 10, 2014 1:43 pm | News | Comments

Researchers say they have identified first steps in the origin of pancreatic cancer and that their findings suggest preventive strategies to explore. In a new study, the scientists described the molecular steps necessary for acinar cells in the pancreas to become precancerous lesions.

U.S. Opens New Ebola Treatment Unit in Liberia

November 10, 2014 10:57 am | by Jonathan Paye-Layleh - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

The United States Monday opened the first of 17 Ebola treatment units it is building in Liberia. The new clinic opened in Tubmanburg, about 60 kilometers (40 miles) north of the capital, Monrovia.                

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