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Height 'Almost Completely Determined' by Genetics

October 6, 2014 11:26 am | News | Comments

The largest genome-wide association study (GWAS) to date, involving more than 300 institutions and more than 250,000 subjects, roughly doubles the number of known gene regions influencing height to more than 400.           

Journalist with Ebola Arrives at Nebraska Hospital

October 6, 2014 8:35 am | by Josh Funk - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

A plane carrying an American photojournalist who contracted Ebola while working in Liberia landed Monday in Nebraska, where he will undergo treatment for the deadly disease. The specially equipped plane Ashoka Mukpo landed at Eppley Airfield in Omaha at around 7:30 a.m. Monday.

Medicine Nobel Goes to Discovery of Brain's GPS

October 6, 2014 7:36 am | by Karl Ritter and Jill Lawless - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

A U.S.-British scientist and a Norwegian husband-and-wife research team won the Nobel Prize in medicine Monday for discovering the brain's navigation system - the inner GPS that helps us find our way in the world - a revelation that could lead to advances in diagnosing Alzheimer's.

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‘Mini-stroke’ May Lead to PTSD

October 3, 2014 2:46 pm | News | Comments

A “mini-stroke” may increase your risk of developing post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), according to new research. The study found that one in three transient ischemic attack (TIA) patients develop PTSD.         

Curiosity Helps Learning, Memory

October 3, 2014 2:32 pm | News | Comments

Curiosity helps us learn about a topic, and being in a curious state also helps the brain memorize unrelated information, according to new research. The study provides insight into how piquing our curiosity changes our brains.        

Viral Infection May Trigger Childhood Diabetes in Utero

October 3, 2014 2:26 pm | News | Comments

The exact cause of juvenile type 1 diabetes has eluded scientists, but a new study suggests a likely trigger before birth. A recent paper puts forth evidence that the autoimmune disease is initiated in utero.           

Ancient Protein-making Enzyme Moonlights as DNA Protector

October 3, 2014 2:18 pm | News | Comments

Scientists have found that an enzyme best known for its fundamental role in building proteins has a second major function: to protect DNA during times of cellular stress.                       

New Visualization Software Uncovers Cancer Subtypes

October 3, 2014 1:42 pm | News | Comments

Much of biomedical research these days is about big data—collecting and analyzing vast, detailed repositories of information about health and disease. These data sets can be treasure troves for investigators, often uncovering genetic mutations that drive a particular kind of cancer, for example.

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DNA ‘Bias’ May Keep Some Diseases in Circulation

October 2, 2014 2:50 pm | News | Comments

A new study found that a bias toward certain types of DNA sequences during gene conversion may be an important factor in why certain heritable diseases persist in populations around the world.                 

Predicting Abstract Judgments from Brain Waves

October 2, 2014 2:44 pm | News | Comments

People make immediate judgments about images they are shown, which could impact on their decisions, even before their brains have had time to consciously process the information, a study of brainwaves has found.            

Schizophrenia, Bipolar Disorder Linked to Dendritic Spine Loss in Brain

October 2, 2014 2:32 pm | News | Comments

Schizophrenia and bipolar disorder both appear to be associated with dendritic spine loss in the brain, according to a new study, which suggests that the two distinct disorders may share common pathophysiological features.        

Making Old Lungs Look New Again

October 2, 2014 2:21 pm | News | Comments

New research shows that the lungs become more inflammatory with age and that ibuprofen can lower that inflammation. In fact, immune cells from old mouse lungs fought tuberculosis bacteria as effectively as cells from young mice after lung inflammation was reduced by ibuprofen.

Liberia to Prosecute Man Who Brought Ebola to U.S.

October 2, 2014 1:35 pm | by David Warren - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

Liberia plans to prosecute the airline passenger who brought Ebola into the U.S., alleging that he lied on an airport questionnaire about not having any contact with an infected person, authorities said Thursday.           

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Gluten Timing Does Not Prevent Celiac Disease

October 1, 2014 5:36 pm | by Marilynn Marchione - AP Chief Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

Two studies give disappointing news for parents looking for a way to prevent celiac disease in babies at higher risk for it because of family history. Neither breast-feeding nor timing the start of gluten-containing foods makes a difference in whether a child develops the problem.

Research Explores New Possibilities for Epilepsy Treatment

October 1, 2014 3:34 pm | News | Comments

Ongoing research is investigating the connection between initial seizures and the onset of epilepsy later in life. Nearly one in 10 Americans will experience an initial seizure, but only 3 percent of those who experience a seizure will go on to develop epilepsy.

Omega-3 Fatty Acids May Prevent Some Forms of Depression

October 1, 2014 3:29 pm | News | Comments

Omega-3 fatty acids, more commonly known as fish oil, have a long list of health benefits, including lowering the risk of heart disease and reducing triglyceride levels. These nutritional compounds are also known to have anti-depressant and anti-inflammatory properties.

Wine Antioxidant Slows Acne

October 1, 2014 3:28 pm | News | Comments

Got grapes? UCLA researchers have demonstrated how resveratrol, an antioxidant derived from grapes and found in wine, works to inhibit growth of the bacteria that causes acne. The team also found that combining resveratrol with a common acne medication, benzoyl peroxide, may enhance the drug's ability to kill the bacteria and could translate into new treatments.  

Memory Loss Associated with Alzheimer's Reversed for First Time

October 1, 2014 3:24 pm | News | Comments

In the first small study of a novel, personalized and comprehensive program to reverse memory loss, nine of 10 participants displayed subjective or objective improvement in their memories.                   

Lift Weights, Improve Your Memory

October 1, 2014 1:29 pm | Videos | Comments

Here’s another reason why it’s a good idea to hit the gym: it can improve memory. A new study shows that an intense workout of as little as 20 minutes can enhance episodic memory, also known as long-term memory for previous events, by about 10 percent in healthy young adults.

Child Dies from Enterovirus 68 Complications

October 1, 2014 12:37 pm | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

The Rhode Island Health Department says a child has died from complications of an unusual respiratory virus that has been affecting children across the U.S.                           

10 Questions, Answers About the U.S. Ebola Case

October 1, 2014 3:36 am | by Lauran Neergaard - AP Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

U.S. health officials have warned for months that someone infected with Ebola could unknowingly carry the virus to this country, and there is word now that it has happened: A traveler in a Dallas hospital became the first patient diagnosed in the U.S.

Early Antibiotic Use Linked to Childhood Obesity Risk

September 30, 2014 2:22 pm | News | Comments

The use of broad-spectrum antibiotics by children before the age of 24 months was associated with increased risk of obesity in early childhood, according to a new study.                       

Modeling Shockwaves Through the Brain

September 30, 2014 2:00 pm | News | Comments

Researchers have developed a scaling law that predicts a human’s risk of brain injury, based on previous studies of blasts’ effects on animal brains. The method may help the military develop more protective helmets, as well as aid clinicians in diagnosing traumatic brain injury.

Breaking News: Six Changing Faces of ‘Global Killer’ Bacteria

September 30, 2014 11:22 am | News | Comments

Researchers have shown for the first time that a genetic switch allows Streptococcus pneumoniae to randomly change its characteristics into six alternative states.                          

Study Examines Cancer Risk from First Atom-bomb Test

September 30, 2014 8:30 am | by Susan Montoya Bryan - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

Researchers from the National Cancer Institute want to know how many past and present cancer cases in New Mexico may be related to the U.S. government's test of the world's first atomic bomb over a remote stretch of desert nearly 70 years ago.  

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