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Study Sheds Light on Asthma, Respiratory Viruses

September 9, 2014 3:32 pm | News | Comments

People with asthma often have a hard time dealing with respiratory viruses such as the flu or the common cold, and researchers have struggled to explain why. Now, the answer is becoming clearer.                

Eating is Addictive, but Sugar, Fat Not Like Drugs

September 9, 2014 2:13 pm | News | Comments

People can become addicted to eating for its own sake but not to consuming specific foods such as those high in sugar or fat, new research suggests. An international team of scientists has found no strong evidence for people being addicted to the chemical substances in certain foods.

Xenon Gas Protects Brain After Head Injury

September 9, 2014 1:52 pm | News | Comments

Scientists found that xenon, given within hours of the initial brain injury, limits brain damage and improves neurological outcomes in mice, both in the short term and long term.                     

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Intelligence Inheritance: 3 Genes That Add to IQ Score

September 9, 2014 1:43 pm | News | Comments

New research published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science (PNAS) shows three genetic variants in humans that can account for a couple of IQ points– but before you get excited, these are only three variants out of likely thousands.

With Surge in Liberia, Ebola Case Toll Above 4,200

September 9, 2014 1:35 pm | by Sarah DiLorenzo and Maria Cheng - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

A surge in Ebola infections in Liberia is driving a spiraling outbreak in West Africa that is increasingly putting health workers at risk as they struggle to treat an overwhelming number of patients.                

Honesty Linked to Prefrontal Brain Region

September 9, 2014 1:18 pm | News | Comments

Are humans programmed to tell the truth? Not when lying is advantageous, says a new study. The report ties honesty to a region of the brain that exerts control over automatic impulses.                   

Breaking News: Prediabetes Ups Cancer Risk 15%

September 9, 2014 9:04 am | News | Comments

A meta-analysis comprising 16 studies and 891,426 participants from various regions of the world shows that prediabetes increases the risk of cancer by 15 percent, with differing risks depending on the type of cancer.         

In Directing Stem Cells, Study Shows Context Matters

September 8, 2014 3:57 pm | News | Comments

Figuring out how blank slate stem cells decide which kind of cell they want to be when they grow up— a muscle cell, a bone cell, a neuron— has been no small task for science. Now, a team of researchers has added a new wrinkle to the cell differentiation equation.

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Single Cell Smashes, Rebuilds Its Own Genome

September 8, 2014 3:52 pm | News | Comments

Life can be so intricate and novel that even a single cell can pack a few surprises, according to a new study. The pond-dwelling, single-celled organism Oxytricha trifallax has the remarkable ability to break its own DNA into nearly a quarter-million pieces and rapidly reassemble those pieces when it's time to mate, the study says.

Mouse Studies Advance Treatment for Common Eye Diseases

September 8, 2014 3:40 pm | News | Comments

Working with mice, a multicenter team of researchers has found a new way to reduce the abnormal blood vessel growth and leakage in the eye that accompany some eye diseases.                       

Serious Respiratory Illness Hits Hundreds of Kids

September 8, 2014 1:24 pm | by Lindsey Tanner - AP Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

Hundreds of children in about a dozen states have been sickened by a severe respiratory illness that public health officials suspect may be caused by an uncommon virus similar to the germ that causes the common cold.          

Liberia Will See Thousands of New Ebola Cases

September 8, 2014 1:24 pm | by Jonathan Paye-layleh - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

The United States and Britain plan to send military personnel to help contain West Africa's Ebola outbreak, as the World Health Organization warned Monday that many thousands of new infections are expected in Liberia in the coming weeks.    

NIH Finds Forgotten Ricin in Lab

September 8, 2014 12:00 pm | by Lauran Neergaard - AP Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

The National Institutes of Health said it has uncovered a nearly century-old container of ricin and a handful of other forgotten samples of dangerous pathogens as it combs its laboratories for improperly stored hazardous materials.     

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Parkinson's, Cancer Findings Earn Lasker Awards

September 8, 2014 9:23 am | by Malcolm Ritter - AP Science Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

Key discoveries about breast cancer, Parkinson's disease and the body's handling of defective proteins have earned prestigious medical awards for five scientists. The Albert and Mary Lasker Foundation announced the winners Monday.     

Oxidized LDL Might Actually be 'Good Guy'

September 5, 2014 3:24 pm | News | Comments

A team of investigators has made a thought-provoking discovery about a type of cholesterol previously believed to be a "bad guy" in the development of heart disease and other conditions.                    

Banked Blood Grows Stiffer With Age

September 5, 2014 3:15 pm | News | Comments

It may look like fresh blood and flow like fresh blood, but the longer blood is stored, the less it can carry oxygen into the tiny microcapillaries of the body, says a new study.                     

Potassium-rich Foods Cut Stroke, Death Risk in Women

September 5, 2014 2:19 pm | News | Comments

Postmenopausal women who eat foods higher in potassium are less likely to have strokes and die than women who eat less potassium-rich foods, according to new research.                       

Stimulation, Deprivation Alter Vascular Structure in Brain

September 5, 2014 2:03 pm | News | Comments

Neurovascular relationships are especially important in the brain. Studies have shown that when neurons work hard, blood flow increases to keep them nourished. Scientists have been asking whether neural activity also changes the structure of local vascular networks. According to new research, the answer is yes.

U.S. Doctor Infected with Ebola in Stable Condition

September 5, 2014 8:24 am | by Margery A. Beck - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

A doctor who became infected with Ebola while working in Liberia is sick, but in stable condition at the Nebraska Medical Center, officials said Friday.                            

Tokyo Closes Park Seen as Local Source of Dengue

September 5, 2014 12:23 am | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

A popular park in downtown Tokyo has been closed temporarily after dozens of cases of dengue fever were contracted by people who visited the area.                              

ZMapp: Best Anti-Ebola Treatment Yet

September 4, 2014 3:05 pm | by Cynthia Fox | Articles | Comments

ZMapp, an experimental drug that may have already have saved a few patients in Africa, is the most effective anti-Ebola therapy yet, according to a recent Nature paper on rhesus macaques monkeys.              

Messenger Molecules a Part of Arthritis Puzzle

September 4, 2014 2:05 pm | News | Comments

The way in which some cells alter their behavior at the onset of osteoarthritis has been identified for the first time. Researchers found that changes in the rate at which molecules in joint cartilage called mRNA are created and destroyed are fundamental to causing this change in behavior.

Research Targets Early Symptoms of Parkinson's

September 4, 2014 1:53 pm | News | Comments

Researchers are investigating markers for potential earlier diagnosis and treatment of Parkinson's disease. The researchers are studying the molecular basis of non-motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease, rather than the better-known clinical symptoms of impaired movement.

New Pain Management Mechanism Unlocked

September 4, 2014 1:30 pm | Videos | Comments

Scientists have discovered a new mechanism that can reverse chronic pain. Using an animal model, the research has found that pain signals in nerve cells can be shut off by interfering with the communication of a specific enzyme with calcium channels.

More Than 8 in 10 U.S. Homes Forbid Smoking

September 4, 2014 1:25 pm | by Mike Stobbe - AP Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

Smoking is banned in more than eight out of 10 U.S. homes— nearly twice as many as two decades ago, according to a new government study. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found smoking is even forbidden in nearly half of homes where an adult smoker resides.

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