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At Least Two Regions of the Brain Decide What We Perceive

September 26, 2014 8:30 am | News | Comments

Tests on the brains of macaques have shown that neurons in at least two regions of the brain, the temporal and frontal lobes, are responsible for deciding which impressions reach our consciousness.                

Simple Blood Test a Possible Tool for Early Cancer Diagnosis

September 26, 2014 8:30 am | News | Comments

High levels of calcium in blood, a condition known as hypercalcemia, can be used by GPs as an early indication of certain types of cancer, according to a new study.                          

Alzheimer's Patients Can Feel the Emotion After the Memories Have Vanished

September 26, 2014 8:30 am | News | Comments

A new study further supports an inescapable message: caregivers have a profound influence— good or bad— on the emotional state of individuals with Alzheimer’s disease.                       

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How a Single, Genetic Change Causes Retinal Tumors in Children

September 26, 2014 8:30 am | News | Comments

New research has answered the long-standing question of why mutations to the RB1 gene primarily cause tumors of the retina and not of other cell types. The study could reveal new cellular signaling pathways relevant to retinal development, cancer development, and ultimately, the development of novel therapies.

Chemists Recruit Anthrax to Deliver Cancer Drugs

September 26, 2014 8:30 am | News | Comments

Bacillus anthracis bacteria have very efficient machinery for injecting toxic proteins into cells, leading to the potentially deadly infection known as anthrax. A team of researchers has now hijacked that delivery system for a different purpose: administering cancer drugs.

Pancreatic Cancer Insight

September 25, 2014 8:30 am | News | Comments

An analysis of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in a mouse model of pancreatic cancer has identified distinct patterns of gene expression in several groups of these cells, including significant differences from the primary tumor that may contribute to their ability to spread.

Study Supports Camels as Primary Source of MERS-CoV Transmission

September 25, 2014 8:30 am | News | Comments

Scientists have provided experimental evidence supporting dromedary camels as the primary reservoir, or carrier, of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV).                       

Toward Better Treatments for Autoimmune Diseases, Bone Loss

September 25, 2014 8:30 am | News | Comments

Scientists have developed an approach to creating treatments for osteoporosis and autoimmune diseases that may avoid the risk of infection and cancer posed by some current medications.                   

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U.S. Issues New Rules for University Germ Research

September 25, 2014 8:30 am | by Lauran Neergaard - AP Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

The Obama administration is tightening oversight of high-stakes scientific research involving dangerous germs that could raise biosecurity concerns, imposing new safety rules on universities and other institutions where such work is done.   

Think You Have Alzheimer's? You May Be Right

September 25, 2014 8:30 am | News | Comments

New research suggests that people who notice their memory is slipping may be on to something. The research appears to confirm that self-reported memory complaints are strong predictors of clinical memory impairment later in life.      

First Mouse Model for ALS Dementia Developed

September 25, 2014 8:30 am | News | Comments

The first animal model for ALS dementia, a form of ALS that also damages the brain, has been developed by scientists. The advance will allow researchers to directly see the brains of living mice, under anesthesia, at the microscopic level.   

BST This Week #18: Brain Test May Improve Autism Diagnosis

September 24, 2014 4:07 pm | Videos | Comments

On this episode of Bioscience Technology This Week, Christina Jakubowski covers research showing that measuring the brain’s response to sights and sounds can help in classifying people on the autism spectrum. Our second story looks at how the human response to unfairness may have involved in support of long-term cooperation.

Enzyme Could Aid Fight of Parasite-borne Diseases

September 24, 2014 3:49 pm | News | Comments

An enzyme found in all living things could be key to fighting deadly parasite-borne diseases, according to a new study. Research into the enzyme, which helps cells convert nutrients into energy, has shown that it is activated in different ways in various species.

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Aging Can be Manipulated for Longer Lifespan

September 24, 2014 3:02 pm | News | Comments

Life expectancy, affected by numerous factors such as better nutrition and availability of vaccines, has increased. Around 150 years ago it was something like 40 years old, and 1,000 years ago about 25. But even as we increasingly reach what appear to be the limits of lifespan, there is likely still scope for even longer lifespans.

Tonsil Stem Cells May Help Repair Liver Damage

September 24, 2014 2:50 pm | News | Comments

The liver provides critical functions, such as ridding the body of toxins. Its failure can be deadly, and there are few options for fixing it. But scientists now report a way to potentially inject stem cells from tonsils to repair damaged livers without surgery.

Diabetes in Need of New Screening, Management Approach

September 24, 2014 2:39 pm | News | Comments

Doctors at three leading research institutions and the American Diabetes Association report that treating patients with prediabetes as if they had diabetes could help prevent or delay the most severe complications associated with this chronic disease.

Alcohol Sensations Influenced by Genes

September 24, 2014 2:31 pm | News | Comments

How people perceive and taste alcohol depends on genetic factors, and that likely influences whether they "like" and consume alcoholic beverages, according to researchers.                       

Breaking News: Multitasking May Change Brain Structure

September 24, 2014 2:06 pm | News | Comments

Simultaneously using mobile phones, laptops and other media devices could be changing the structure of our brains, according to new research.                               

Red Cross Team Attacked While Burying Ebola Dead

September 24, 2014 9:36 am | by Boubacar Diallo - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

A Red Cross team was attacked while collecting bodies believed to be infected with Ebola in southeastern Guinea, the latest in a string of assaults that are hindering efforts to control West Africa's current outbreak.          

Grant Will Help Study Link Between Blueberries, Bone Health

September 23, 2014 2:42 pm | News | Comments

A $3.7 million grant will allow Purdue University researchers to study how blueberries reduce bone loss in postmenopausal women. The project begins Sept. 30 under a five-year grant from the National Institutes of Health's National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine.

Consumption of Fruits, Veggies May Keep the Blues Away

September 23, 2014 2:33 pm | News | Comments

A new study focused on mental well-being found that high and low mental well-being were consistently associated with an individual’s fruit and vegetable consumption.                          

Lost Protein Could Prevent Hardening of the Arteries

September 23, 2014 2:23 pm | News | Comments

Researchers have found that when the protein matrix metalloproteinase-14 (MMP-14) is reduced or lost, white blood cells, known as macrophages, become good and could prevent hardening of the arteries, rupture and sudden death.        

Nanotubes Help Healing Hearts Keep the Beat

September 23, 2014 1:59 pm | Videos | Comments

Carbon nanotubes serve as bridges that allow electrical signals to pass unhindered through new pediatric heart-defect patches invented at Rice University and Texas Children’s Hospital.                    

Airway Muscle-on-a-chip Mimics Asthma

September 23, 2014 1:46 pm | News | Comments

Hope for healthier airways may be on the horizon thanks to a human airway muscle-on-a-chip that could be used to test new drugs because it accurately mimics the way smooth muscle contracts in the human airway, under normal circumstances and when exposed to asthma triggers.

Presence or Absence of Early Language Delay Alters Brain Anatomy in Autism

September 23, 2014 1:39 pm | News | Comments

Individual differences in early language development, and in later language functioning, are associated with changes in the anatomy of the brain in autism. A new study has found that a common characteristic of autism– language delay in early childhood– leaves a "signature" in the brain.

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