Advertisement
Health
Subscribe to Health
View Sample

FREE Email Newsletter

Scientists Generate 3-D Structure of Malaria Parasite Genome

April 7, 2014 1:21 pm | News | Comments

Researchers have generated a 3-D model of the human malaria parasite genome at three different stages in the parasite’s life cycle— the first time such 3-D architecture has been generated during the progression of the life cycle of a parasite.  

Caffeine Can Target Tau Deposits in Alzheimer's

April 7, 2014 12:33 pm | News | Comments

A research team was able to demonstrate for the first time that caffeine has a positive effect on tau deposits in Alzheimer's disease. Tau deposits, along with beta-amyloid plaques, are among the characteristic features of Alzheimer's disease. 

Messenger of Pain Identified

April 7, 2014 12:10 pm | News | Comments

In their pursuit of understanding how pain works at the molecular level, a research team has found a new function for MicroRNAs, short stretches of genetic material that signal genes to turn on or off.               

Advertisement

Experts Decode Germs' DNA to Fight Food Poisoning

April 6, 2014 8:18 am | by Lauran Neergaard - AP Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

Chances are you've heard of mapping genes to diagnose rare diseases, predict your risk of cancer and tell your ancestry. But to uncover food poisonings? The nation's disease detectives are beginning a program to try to outsmart outbreaks by routinely decoding the DNA of potentially deadly bacteria and viruses.

Flipping the Switch on Scleroderma

April 4, 2014 1:58 pm | News | Comments

Scleroderma is a rare and often fatal disease, causing the thickening of tissue, which currently lacks a cure and any effective treatments. A group of researchers, including a Michigan State University professor, is looking to change that. Neubig, along with several of his colleagues from the University of Michigan, have identified the core signaling pathway that activates the disease and the chemical compounds that can turn it off.

A Brain Region for Resisting Alcohol's Allure

April 3, 2014 1:14 pm | News | Comments

University of Utah neuroscientists report that when a region of the brain called the lateral habenula is chronically inactivated in rats, they repeatedly drink to excess and are less able to learn from the experience. The study has implications for understanding behaviors that drive alcohol addiction.

Study Looks at Why Vitamin D Deficiency Diagnoses Surged

April 1, 2014 1:55 pm | News | Comments

New research from Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center suggests that physicians are ordering vitamin D deficiency screening tests for preventive care purposes rather than after patients develop conditions caused by decreased bone density.

New Screening Tool to Diagnose Common Sleep Problem in Children

April 1, 2014 1:16 pm | News | Comments

Clinical investigators at the Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario (CHEO) have developed a new screening tool to help diagnose obstructive sleep apnea in children. Evidence suggests that adults with a large neck circumference are more likely to develop obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), especially males. As neck circumference varies by age and sex, there have been no reference ranges to diagnose pediatric OSA up until now.

Advertisement

Strong Link Between Obesity and 'Carb breakdown' Gene

March 31, 2014 1:51 pm | News | Comments

Researchers at King’s College London and Imperial College London have discovered that people with fewer copies of a gene coding for a carb-digesting enzyme may be at higher risk of obesity. The findings suggest that dietary advice may need to be more tailored to an individual’s digestive system, based on whether they have the genetic predisposition and necessary enzymes to digest different foods.

Brain Degeneration in Huntington’s Caused by Amino Acid Deficiency

March 27, 2014 12:58 pm | News | Comments

Neuroscientists report they have identified what they believe is the cause of the vast disintegration of a part of the brain called the corpus striatum in rodents and people with Huntington’s disease: loss of the ability to make the amino acid cysteine.

Genetics Explain Why Infections Trigger Rheumatoid Arthritis

March 27, 2014 12:40 pm | News | Comments

A team of researchers believe their findings could have important implications for the way that rheumatoid arthritis is diagnosed and treated. They say that more accurate clinical testing is now needed to better identify rheumatoid arthritis and to prevent it being misdiagnosed.

Heart Responds Differently to Exercise in Men, Women

March 27, 2014 12:20 pm | News | Comments

The formula for peak exercise heart rate that doctors have used for decades in tests to diagnose heart conditions may be flawed because it does not account for differences between men and women, new research says.            

Autism Linked to Flawed Prenatal Brain Growth

March 27, 2014 11:46 am | by Lindsey Tanner - AP Medical Writer | Videos | Comments

A small study that examined brains from children who died found abnormal patterns of cell growth in autistic children. The research bolsters evidence that something before birth might cause autism, at least in some cases.         

Advertisement

Catheter Innovation Destroys Dangerous Biofilms

March 25, 2014 1:26 pm | Videos | Comments

For the millions of people forced to rely on a plastic tube to eliminate their urine, developing an infection is nearly a 100 percent guarantee after just four weeks. But with the help of a little bubble-blowing, biomedical engineers hope to bring relief to urethras everywhere.

Light-activated Antimicrobial Surface Also Works in the Dark

March 25, 2014 11:51 am | News | Comments

Researchers at University College London developed a new antibacterial material which has potential for cutting hospital acquired infections. The combination of two simple dyes with nanoscopic particles of gold is deadly to bacteria when activated by light - even under modest indoor lighting. And in a first for this type of substance, it also shows impressive antibacterial properties in total darkness.

Breaking News: Bipolar Neurons Made from Skin Cells

March 25, 2014 11:46 am | News | Comments

What makes a person bipolar, prone to manic highs and deep, depressed lows? Why does bipolar disorder run so strongly in families? And why is it so hard to find new treatments? New stem cell research may help scientists find answers to these questions.

Cellular 'Counting' of Rhythmic Signals Synchronizes Changes in Cell Fate

March 24, 2014 2:28 pm | News | Comments

Biologists  discovered that when biological signals hit cells in rhythmic waves, the magnitude of the cells' response can depend on the number of signaling cycles—not their strength or duration. Because such so-called “oscillating signaling cycles” are common in many biological systems, the findings in single-celled organisms could help explain the molecular workings of phenomena such as tissue and organ formation.

Gene Expression Signature Reveals New Way to Classify Gum Disease

March 24, 2014 2:17 pm | News | Comments

Researchers at Columbia University Medical Center have devised a new system for classifying periodontal disease based on the genetic signature of affected tissue, rather than on clinical signs and symptoms. The new classification system may allow for earlier detection and more individualized treatment of severe periodontitis, before loss of teeth and supportive bone occurs.

Switching an Antibiotic On and Off with Light

March 21, 2014 1:43 pm | News | Comments

Scientists of the KIT and the University of Kiev have produced an antibiotic, whose biological activity can be controlled with light. Thanks to the robust diarylethene photoswitch, the antimicrobial effect of the peptide mimetic can be applied in a spatially and temporally specific manner. This might open up new options for the treatment of local infections, as side effects are reduced.

Cholesterol Transporter Structure Decoded

March 21, 2014 1:25 pm | News | Comments

Scientists in Göttingen have solved the high-resolution structure of the molecular transporter TSPO, which introduces cholesterol into mitochondria. This protein also serves as a docking site for diagnostic markers and different drugs, such as Valium. The detailed knowledge of its three-dimensional shape and function opens up new diagnostic and therapeutic perspectives.

Genetic Clue to Irritable Bowel Syndrome Found

March 21, 2014 11:38 am | News | Comments

Is irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) caused by genetics, diet, past trauma, anxiety? All are thought to play a role, but now, for the first time, researchers have reported a defined genetic defect that causes a subset of IBS. Researchers found that patients with a subset of IBS have a specific genetic defect, a mutation of the SCN5A gene. This defect causes patients to have a disruption in bowel function.

A Braking System for Immune Responses

March 21, 2014 11:01 am | News | Comments

For the first time, researchers have identified a receptor on human cells that specifically recognizes crystals. It is found on immune cells and binds uric acid crystals, which trigger gout but also control immune responses.By discovering the immune receptor for uric acid crystals, the researchers have gained an understanding of the fundamental mechanism by which the immune system recognizes crystals.

Can 'Love Hormone' Protect Against Addiction?

March 20, 2014 1:49 pm | News | Comments

Researchers at the University of Adelaide say addictive behavior such as drug and alcohol abuse could be associated with poor development of the so-called "love hormone" system in our bodies during early childhood. The idea resulted from a review of worldwide research into oxytocin, known as the "love hormone" or "bonding drug" because of its important role in enhancing social interactions, maternal behavior and partnership.

Half of US Adults 40 to 75 Eligible for Statins

March 19, 2014 5:17 pm | by Marilynn Marchione - AP Chief Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

Almost half of Americans ages 40 to 75 and nearly all men over 60 qualify to consider cholesterol-lowering statin drugs under new heart disease prevention guidelines, an analysis concludes. It's the first independent look at the impact of the guidelines issued in November and shows how dramatically they shift more people toward treatment.

Breaking News: Dark Chocolate Health Mystery Solved

March 18, 2014 2:30 pm | News | Comments

The health benefits of eating dark chocolate have been extolled for centuries, but the exact reason has remained a mystery. Now, researchers are reporting that certain bacteria in the stomach gobble dark chocolate and ferment it into anti-inflammatory compounds that are good for the heart. 

X
You may login with either your assigned username or your e-mail address.
The password field is case sensitive.
Loading