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DNA Sequencing Helps Spot Glaucoma Defects

November 10, 2014 2:03 pm | News | Comments

Scientists have sequenced the mitochondrial genome in glaucoma patients to help further understanding into the genetic basis for the disease. Glaucoma is a major cause of irreversible blindness, affecting more than 60 million people worldwide.  

Researchers Identify New Genetic Cause of Epilepsy

November 7, 2014 11:56 am | News | Comments

A research team has used whole genome sequencing to identify a new genetic cause of a severe, rare and complex form of epilepsy that becomes evident in early childhood and can lead to early death.               

Identical Genes Don’t Hinder Bacteria's Ability to Adapt

November 7, 2014 11:30 am | News | Comments

Bacteria in colonies don’t reproduce sexually and are genetically identical, yet they can prepare in advance for changing environmental conditions. Researchers have shown that bacteria carry out this strategy by producing cells with differing amounts of specific proteins that govern their response to chemical signals.

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DNA Study Dates Eurasian Split from East Asians

November 6, 2014 9:55 pm | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

The human populations now predominant in Eurasia and East Asia probably split between 36,200 and 45,000 years ago, according to a study released Thursday.                           

Ebola and Marburg are Millions of Years Old, Not Thousands

November 6, 2014 2:19 pm | by Cynthia Fox, Science Writer | Articles | Comments

Ebola and Marburg are 16 to 23 million years old, not thousands of years old as once thought, according to a new study. The research also indicates that while Ebola and Marburg diverged from each other millions of years ago.    

Genetic Damage Caused by Asthma Shows Up in Blood Stream

November 5, 2014 12:52 pm | News | Comments

Asthma may be more harmful than was previously thought, according to researchers who found that genetic damage is present in circulating, or peripheral, blood.                          

New Tool Could Help Reshape the Limits of Synthetic Biology

November 5, 2014 12:44 pm | News | Comments

Geneticists report they have developed a novel tool— dubbed “the telomerator”— that could redefine the limits of synthetic biology and advance how successfully living things can be engineered or constructed in the laboratory based on an organism’s genetic, chemical base-pair structure.

Environmental Carcinogens Leave Distinctive Genetic Imprints in Tumors

November 5, 2014 10:45 am | News | Comments

Genetically engineering tumors in mice, a technique that has dominated cancer research for decades, may not replicate important features of cancers caused by exposure to environmental carcinogens, according to a new study.        

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Google’s Next Business Venture: The Human Body

November 5, 2014 8:30 am | by Ryan Bushey, Associate Editor | Articles | Comments

Through a new, semi-secretive extension of the company, Google is working on a slew of ambitious projects that could drastically revolutionize healthcare as we know it.                    

System Helps Move Toward Genetic Editing

November 4, 2014 3:06 pm | News | Comments

As potential next-generation therapeutics and research tools, few life sciences technologies hold more promise than genome-editing proteins— molecules that can be programmed to alter specific genes to treat or perhaps cure genetic diseases.    

Making Age Reversal Real

November 4, 2014 1:23 pm | Videos | Comments

Professor David Sinclair has some complaints about the human lifespan. It’s too short, for a start. But, “it doesn’t have to be this way,” he told an audience on Monday.                       

Mutant Models Reveal Cancer’s Strategies

November 4, 2014 12:51 pm | News | Comments

A group of scientists has fused the power of statistical physics and artificial intelligence into a mathematical toolkit that can turn cancer-mutation data into multidimensional models that show how specific mutations alter the social networks of proteins in cells.

The Man with a Thousand Brains

October 31, 2014 11:13 am | News | Comments

Forty million people worldwide are living with Alzheimer’s and this is only set to increase. But tiny brains grown in culture could help scientists learn more about this mysterious disease– and test new drugs.            

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Lab-made 'Ribozyme' Could Explain Origins of Life

October 30, 2014 12:45 pm | News | Comments

Mimicking natural evolution in a test tube, scientists have devised an enzyme with a unique property that might have been crucial to the origin of life on Earth. The achievement is also likely to yield a powerful tool for evolving new and useful molecules.

Dozens of New Autism Genes Identified

October 30, 2014 11:10 am | News | Comments

Two major genetic studies of autism have newly implicated dozens of genes in the disorder. The research shows that rare mutations in these genes affect communication networks in the brain and compromise fundamental biological mechanisms.    

Genetic Link to Kidney Stones Identified

October 29, 2014 1:14 pm | News | Comments

A new breakthrough could help kidney stone sufferers get an exact diagnosis and specific treatment after genetic links to the condition were identified.                             

Genetic Screening Could Reduce Number of Breast Cancer Cases

October 29, 2014 12:37 pm | News | Comments

Should every newborn baby girl be genetically screened for breast-cancer risk? That isn’t cost-effective— yet. But if it were, would it be worthwhile? A previous study said no. But, new research suggests otherwise.           

Researchers Sequence Enterovirus D68 Genome

October 29, 2014 11:24 am | News | Comments

Researchers have sequenced the genome of enterovirus D68 sampled from patients treated at St. Louis Children’s Hospital. Nationwide, the virus has spread rapidly in recent months.                     

Imaging the Genome

October 28, 2014 3:10 pm | News | Comments

A new study has allowed researchers to peer into unexplored regions of the genome and understand for the first time the role played by more than 250 genes key to cell growth and development.                 

DNA-repairing Enzyme Can Worsen Tissue Damage

October 28, 2014 3:04 pm | News | Comments

When tissues are deprived of blood, as happens during a stroke or heart attack, the lack of oxygen can cause serious damage. A new study shows that surprisingly, a DNA-repair enzyme called Aag actually makes this damage worse.       

Algae Virus Found in Healthy Human Throats

October 28, 2014 1:51 pm | News | Comments

Scientists have discovered an algae virus never before seen in the throats of healthy people that may subtly alter a range of cognitive functions including visual processing and spatial orientation in those who harbor it.         

New Home Test Shakes Up Colon Cancer Screening

October 27, 2014 8:30 am | by Marilynn Marchione - AP Chief Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

Starting Monday, millions of people who have avoided colon cancer screening can get a new home test that's noninvasive and doesn't require the icky preparation most other methods do. The test is the first to look for cancer-related DNA in stool. 

Thyroid Cancer Genome Analysis Finds Markers of Aggressive Tumors

October 24, 2014 10:21 am | News | Comments

A new comprehensive analysis of thyroid cancer from The Cancer Genome Atlas Research Network has identified markers of aggressive tumors, which could allow for better targeting of appropriate treatments to individual patients.       

Scientists ID Gene Required for Recovery from Bacterial Infection

October 24, 2014 10:07 am | News | Comments

Researchers have uncovered the genes that are normally activated during recovery from bacterial infection. The finding could lead to ways to jumpstart this recovery process and possibly fend off autoimmune diseases and chronic inflammatory disorders.

New ALS-associated Gene Identified

October 23, 2014 12:33 pm | News | Comments

Using an innovative exome sequencing strategy, a team of international scientists has shown that TUBA4A, the gene encoding the Tubulin Alpha 4A protein, is associated with familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS).         

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