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Gene Slows Bone Loss, Promotes Bone Formation

August 12, 2014 12:29 pm | News | Comments

A gene discovery brings scientists closer to developing therapeutic agents that could slow down bone loss and regenerate lost bone, which could provide relief for millions suffering from aging-related bone loss.           

Editing HPV's Genes to Kill Cervical Cancer Cells

August 11, 2014 2:13 pm | News | Comments

Researchers have hijacked a defense system normally used by bacteria to fend off viral infections and redirected it against the human papillomavirus (HPV), the virus that causes cervical, head and neck, and other cancers.Using the genome editing tool known as CRISPR, the Duke University researchers were able to selectively destroy two viral genes responsible for the growth and survival of cervical carcinoma cells.

Scientists Unlock Key to Blood Vessel Formation

August 11, 2014 2:09 pm | News | Comments

Scientists from the University of Leeds have discovered a gene that plays a vital role in blood vessel formation, research which adds to our knowledge of how early life develops. The discovery could also lead to greater understanding of how to treat cardiovascular diseases and cancer.

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Largest Cancer Genetic Analysis Reveals New Way of Classifying Cancer

August 7, 2014 2:24 pm | News | Comments

Researchers with The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Research Network have completed the largest, most diverse tumor genetic analysis ever conducted, revealing a new approach to classifying cancers. The work not only revamps traditional ideas of how cancers are diagnosed and treated, but could also have a profound impact on the future landscape of drug development.

New Gene Tied to Breast Cancer Risk

August 6, 2014 5:23 pm | by Marilynn Marchione - AP Chief Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

It's long been known that faulty BRCA genes greatly raise the risk for breast cancer. Now, scientists say a more recently identified, less common gene - called PALB2 - can do the same.                 

“Treatments Waiting to be Discovered” Inside New Database

August 6, 2014 2:00 pm | News | Comments

Your genes are blueprints for proteins, and molecules called microRNA can help to determine how often these genetic blueprints are manufactured into proteins. Researchers often ask what microRNA regulates a gene related to disease. Or what gene is regulated by a microRNA found in sick patients? The answers to these questions could help doctors and researchers manipulate protein levels in the body that cause disease.

‘Jumping Genes’ Help Black Truffles Adapt

August 6, 2014 12:55 pm | News | Comments

Black truffles expensive and highly prized in the world of haute cuisine, but in the world of epigenetics, the fungi are of major interest for another reason: their unique pattern of DNA methylation, a biochemical process that chemically modifies nucleic acids without changing their sequence.

New DNA Analysis Technique Promises Speedier Diagnosis

August 5, 2014 2:01 pm | News | Comments

Researchers have achieved a technical breakthrough that should result in speedier diagnosis of cancer and various pre-natal conditions. The key discovery lies in a new tool that allows researchers to load long strands of DNA into a tunable nanoscale imaging chamber in ways that maintain their structural identity and under conditions that are similar to those found in the human body.

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DNA Modifications Predict Brain’s Threat Response

August 4, 2014 1:01 pm | News | Comments

The tiny addition of a chemical mark atop a gene that is well known for its involvement in clinical depression and posttraumatic stress disorder can affect the way a person’s brain responds to threats, according to a new study.       

New Genetic Risk Markers Found in Pancreatic Cancer

August 4, 2014 12:46 pm | News | Comments

A large DNA analysis of people with and without pancreatic cancer has identified several new genetic markers that signal increased risk of developing the highly lethal disease, scientists report.               

Small RNAs in Blood May Reveal Heart Injury

August 4, 2014 12:07 pm | News | Comments

New research suggests that microRNAs may be able to relay valuable information about damage to the heart: Scientists have linked an increase in certain microRNAs circulating in the blood with injury to cardiac muscle.          

Mosaicism: Study Clarifies Parents as Source of New Mutations

July 31, 2014 3:36 pm | News | Comments

Scientists have long speculated that mosaicism plays a bigger role in the transmission of rare disease mutations than is currently known. Now, a study sheds new light on the frequency of mosaicism in genomic disorders and its influence on recurrence risk.

Strict Genomic Partitioning by Biological Clock Separates Key Metabolic Functions

July 31, 2014 3:10 pm | News | Comments

Much of the liver’s metabolic function is governed by circadian rhythms—our own body clock—and UC Irvine researchers have now found two independent mechanisms by which this occurs. The study reveals new information about the body clock’s sway over metabolism and points the way to more focused drug treatments for liver disease and such metabolic disorders as obesity and diabetes.

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Biologists Describe Mechanism Promoting Multiple DNA Mutations

July 31, 2014 1:03 pm | News | Comments

DNA mutations—long known to fuel cancer as well as evolutionary changes in a living organism—had been thought to be rare events that occur randomly throughout the genome. However, recent studies have shown that cancer development frequently involves the formation of multiple mutations that arise simultaneously and in close proximity to each other.

Drug Target Identified for Common Childhood Blood Cancer

July 31, 2014 12:00 pm | News | Comments

In what is believed to be the largest genetic analysis of what triggers and propels progression of tumor growth in a common childhood blood cancer, researchers report that they have identified a possible new drug target for treating the disease. 

Same Cancer, Different Time Zone

July 31, 2014 8:30 am | News | Comments

Just as no two people possess the same genetic makeup, a recent study has shown that no two single tumor cells in breast cancer patients have an identical genome.                          

Bioscience Technology This Week #4: Gold Nanoparticles Show Promise for Drug Delivery

July 30, 2014 2:02 pm | Videos | Comments

On this episode of Bioscience Technology This Week, Editor-in-Chief Rob Fee reports on gold nanoparticles' promise in drug delivery. Our second story examines the work being done to decipher the wheat genome and the implications of this work.

New Study Looks at How Epigenetic Effects are Passed Down

July 30, 2014 12:22 pm | News | Comments

A new study demonstrates that the ‘memory’ of nutrition during pregnancy can be passed through sperm of male offspring to the next generation, increasing risk of disease for grandchildren as well. In other words, to adapt an old maxim, ‘you are what your grandmother ate.’

Breaking News: Blood Test Could Predict Suicide Risk

July 30, 2014 8:30 am | News | Comments

Researchers say they have discovered a chemical alteration in a single human gene linked to stress reactions that could give doctors a simple blood test to reliably predict a person’s risk of attempting suicide.            

New Gene Function Discovery Offers Clues to ALS

July 29, 2014 12:11 pm | News | Comments

Researchers have found a missing link that helps to explain how ALS, one of the world’s most feared diseases, paralyses and ultimately kills its victims. The breakthrough is helping them trace a path to a treatment or even a cure.       

Six New Genetic Risk Factors for Parkinson’s Found

July 28, 2014 11:36 am | News | Comments

Using data from over 18,000 patients, scientists have identified more than two dozen genetic risk factors involved in Parkinson’s disease, including six that had not been previously reported.                 

A New Look at Stomach Cancer

July 28, 2014 11:30 am | News | Comments

In a massive effort to catalog the molecular causes of stomach cancer, scientists have identified four subtypes of tumors based on shared mutations and other molecular abnormalities.                    

Scientists ID New Mechanism of Drug Resistance

July 28, 2014 11:24 am | News | Comments

Microorganisms can evade treatment by acquiring mutations in the genes targeted by antibiotics or antifungal drugs. Now, a new study has shown that microorganisms can use a temporary silencing of drug targets to gain the benefits of drug resistance without the commitment.

Only 8.2% of DNA is ‘Functional’

July 24, 2014 2:45 pm | News | Comments

Only 8.2 percent of human DNA is likely to be doing something important – is “functional”– say researchers. This figure is very different from one given in 2012, when some scientists stated that 80 percent of our genome has some biochemical function.

Mapping Finds New Schizophrenia-linked Genes

July 23, 2014 8:30 am | by Seth Borenstein - AP Science Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

Scientists have linked more than 100 spots in our DNA to the risk of developing schizophrenia, casting light on the mystery of what makes the disease tick. Such work could eventually point to new treatments, although they are many years away.   

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