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The Molecular Biology Behind ALS

January 23, 2015 4:58 pm | by Brandeis Univ. | News | Comments

By now, most everyone has seen videos all over social media of friends and family dousing themselves in ice cold water as part of the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge.                                                 

Reducing Myc Gene Activity Extends Healthy Lifespan in Mice

January 23, 2015 4:48 pm | by Brown University | News | Comments

A team of scientists based at Brown University has found that reducing expression of a fundamentally important gene called Myc significantly increased the healthy lifespan of laboratory mice, the first such finding regarding this gene in a mammalian species.

Telomere Extension Turns Back Aging Clock in Cultured Human Cells

January 23, 2015 4:44 pm | by Stanford University | News | Comments

A new procedure can quickly and efficiently increase the length of human telomeres, the protective caps on the ends of chromosomes that are linked to aging and disease.                

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Why Protein Mutations Lead to Parkinson's Disease

January 22, 2015 4:29 pm | by UCSD | News | Comments

A new study has shown for the first time why protein mutations lead to the familial form of Parkinson’s disease.                         

President Obama Announces Precision Medicine Initiative

January 22, 2015 12:32 pm | by Ryan Bushey, Associate Editor | Articles | Comments

The President briefly mentioned the project during the State of The Union earlier this week.                            

Moving Closer to a Personalized Treatment Solution for Intellectual Disability

January 22, 2015 10:36 am | by Scripps Research Institute | News | Comments

Scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have produced an approach that protects animal models against a type of genetic disruption that causes intellectual disability, including serious memory impairments and altered anxiety levels.

New Cellular Pathway Triggering Allergic Asthma Response Identified

January 20, 2015 10:25 am | by UC San Diego | News | Comments

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine, with collaborators in Korea and Scotland, have identified a novel signaling pathway critical to the immune response of cells associated with the initiation of allergic asthma.         

Scientists Find How Many Cancers May Evade Treatment

January 16, 2015 10:54 am | by University of Wisconsin-Madison | News | Comments

The drugs were designed to keep cancer cells at bay by preventing their growth, survival and spread. Yet, after clinical trials, they left scientists scratching their heads and drug developers watching their investments succumb to cancer’s latest triumph.

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Teasing Out Genes that Signal Heart Failure Risk

January 16, 2015 10:00 am | by Lauren Neergaard, AP Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

Scientists are unraveling a mystery behind a fairly common disease that leads to heart failure: Why do some people with a key mutated gene fall ill while others stay healthy? Researchers tested more than 5,200 people to tease apart when mutations really are harmful or are just bystanders. 

Studying Fetal Liver Fibrogenesis

January 14, 2015 4:07 pm | by Sarah Plumridge, Northwestern University | News | Comments

Fibrosis is a constant feature of all chronic liver diseases.                                 

Genetic Predictor of Serious Brain Stroke Complications Discovered

January 13, 2015 3:50 pm | by University of Florida | News | Comments

Researchers have found a possible predictor for little understood -- but often disabling or even fatal -- stroke complications.                       

Scientists Create Device for Extracting Tumor Cells from Blood

January 13, 2015 3:13 pm | by UCLA | News | Comments

When 2 milliliters of blood are run through the chip, the tumor cells stick to the nanowires like Velcro.                          

Mutation Maps

January 13, 2015 9:52 am | News | Comments

DNA sequences were once thought to be identical from cell to cell, but it’s increasingly understood that mutations can arise during brain development that affect only certain groups of brain cells.                                          

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Genome Sequencing of 200-Year-Old Whales May Help Humans Fight Disease

January 13, 2015 9:07 am | by Cynthia Fox, Science Writer | Articles | Comments

For the first time, the genome of a mammal longer-lived than man has been sequenced: the bowhead whale, who lives 200-plus years, and gets far less cancer given its size.                                       

Tracing Cancer Back to Its Origins

January 12, 2015 9:23 am | by Columbia University | News | Comments

The fingers of papillary tumors often grow back after surgery, but flat carcinoma in situ cancers are typically more aggressive and more likely to spread.                  

The Bacteria That Help Us Digest Yeast Could Fight Disease

January 12, 2015 9:12 am | by University of Michigan | News | Comments

Bacteria that have evolved to help us digest the yeast that give beer and bread their bubbles could support the development of new treatments to help people fight off yeast infections and autoimmune diseases such as Crohn’s disease.     

Biogen Idec, Columbia to Conduct Collaborative Genetics Research

January 12, 2015 8:48 am | by Columbia University | News | Comments

The agreement will integrate genomics research conducted at Columbia with Biogen Idec’s understanding of disease mechanisms and pathways, and expertise in discovering new medicines.             

Pros and Cons: Alcohol Consumption for 10M Years

January 8, 2015 5:16 pm | by Cynthia Fox, Science Writer | Articles | Comments

We’ve been imbibing alcohol for ten million years, and the start of that long drinking binge coincided with our descent from the trees. So alcohol may have brought us (along with lots of hangovers), some measure of our humanity.                                               

The Best Offense Against Bacteria is a Good Defense

January 7, 2015 4:17 pm | by Ohio State University | News | Comments

A small protein active in the human immune response can disable bacterial toxins by exploiting a property that makes the toxins effective.                     

Trying for Test-Tube Baby? Risks to Mom Are Rare

January 7, 2015 4:01 pm | by Lindsey Tanner - AP Medical Writer | News | Comments

A new 12-year U.S. study shows the most frequent involve drugs used to stimulate ovaries, but it suggests problems are rarely fatal.                      

Genetic Clue Points to Most Vulnerable Children

January 7, 2015 9:32 am | by Duke University | News | Comments

Some children are more sensitive to their environments, for better and for worse. Now Duke University researchers have identified a gene variant that may serve as a marker for these children, who are among society’s most vulnerable.  

How Bacteria Control Their Size

January 7, 2015 9:21 am | by WUSTL | News | Comments

Scientists have traditionally studied bacteria in large numbers, not individually. Working with tens of millions of cells in a culture flask, they tracked their growth by looking at how much the cells dimmed light passing through a tube.

Genome Editing Tool Shows Promise in Engineering Human Stem Cells

January 5, 2015 4:21 pm | by Johns Hopkins University | News | Comments

Scientists discovered that a genome editing tool can precisely and efficiently alter human stem cells.                        

Researchers Study Potential Blood Test for Prostate Cancer

January 5, 2015 4:11 pm | by Vanderbilt University | News | Comments

Vanderbilt University researcher William Mitchell, M.D., Ph.D., and colleagues in Germany and Canada have demonstrated a method for detecting “cell-free” tumor DNA in the bloodstream.                            

New Clues Why Older Women Are More Susceptible to Breast Cancer

January 5, 2015 3:48 pm | by Skip Derra, Contributing Writer | Articles | Comments

The idea that breast cancer becomes more prevalent with age is fairly well established, but the reasons why are still uncertain. Now, scientists from the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have new insights into why older women are more susceptible to breast cancer.

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