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Fewer Viral Relics May Be Due to a Less Bloody Evolutionary History

February 4, 2015 2:36 pm | by University of Oxford | News | Comments

Humans have fewer remnants of viral DNA in their genes compared to other mammals.                              

Nanoparticle Gene Therapy Treats Brain Cancer in Rats

February 4, 2015 10:01 am | by Johns Hopkins | News | Comments

Despite improvements in the past few decades with surgery, chemotherapy and radiation therapy, a predictably curative treatment for glioma does not yet exist. New insights into specific gene mutations that arise in this often deadly form of brain cancer have pointed to the potential of gene therapy, but it’s very difficult to effectively deliver toxic or missing genes to cancer cells in the brain.

Cancer-focused Array for Malignancies, Tumors

February 3, 2015 1:50 pm | Product Releases | Comments

Oxford Gene Technology (OGT) offers the CytoSure Consortium Cancer +SNP array (4x180k). The array allows the simultaneous detection of copy number variation (CNV) and loss of heterozygosity (LOH), with a SNP resolution that enables reporting of LOH at 10Mb.

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Two Genetic Mutations May Interact to Lower Heart Attack Risk

February 3, 2015 1:24 pm | by Ohio State Univ. | News | Comments

Researchers have determined that two mutations on a single gene can interact in a way that lowers the carrier's risk for a heart attack.  The variants are found in a gene called DBH, which regulates an enzyme involved in the conversion of dopamine to norepinephrine - both of which are important chemical messengers and hormones.

Uncovering Genetic Trigger for Immune Response

February 3, 2015 1:06 pm | by Yale University | News | Comments

The thousands of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) molecules present in each cell are known primarily for their role converting food and oxygen into energy. But Yale researchers have identified an unexpected relationship between mtDNA and the innate immune response.

UK House of Commons OKs Making Babies From DNA of 3 People

February 3, 2015 12:29 pm | by Maria Cheng, AP Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

Britain's House of Commons gave preliminary approval to permitting scientists to create babies from the DNA of three people, a technique that could protect some children from inheriting potentially fatal diseases from their mothers. Read more...

Illusion Aids Understanding of Autism

February 2, 2015 2:48 pm | by Monash University | News | Comments

New research could lead to a better understanding of how the brain works in people with autism.                                               

President Obama Reveals Details About Precision Medicine Project

February 1, 2015 6:45 pm | by Ryan Bushey, Associate Editor | Videos | Comments

President Obama held a press conference revealing new details surrounding the Precision Medicine initiative he announced during the State of The Union.                               

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Variety Show

January 29, 2015 3:15 pm | by Stephanie Dutchen, Harvard Medical School | News | Comments

Researchers have begun to appreciate the importance of copy number variation when considering the connections between DNA and disease.                     

Exploring Upper Motor Neuron Degeneration in ALS

January 28, 2015 3:00 pm | by Nora Dunne, Northwestern University | News | Comments

For the first time, scientists have revealed a mechanism underlying the cellular degeneration of upper motor neurons, a small group of neurons in the brain recently shown to play a major role in ALS pathology.         

Improving on Pancreatitis Treatment

January 28, 2015 2:52 pm | by Sharon Tregaskis, Columbia University | News | Comments

For people with pancreatitis, a noncancerous inflammation of the tiny ducts in the 6-inch organ, the discomfort can be devastating.                      

Longevity Gene Variant Discovery

January 28, 2015 10:36 am | by UCSF | News | Comments

People who carry a variant of a gene that is associated with longevity also have larger volumes in a front part of the brain involved in planning and decision-making, according to researchers at UC San Francisco.                                      

Biology, Driven by Data

January 28, 2015 10:00 am | by MIT | News | Comments

Cells are incredibly complicated machines with thousands of interacting parts — and disruptions to any of those interactions can cause disease.                                     

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By Taking a Rest, Exhausted T Cells Live to Fight Another Day

January 26, 2015 9:56 am | by Howard Hughes Medical Institute | News | Comments

Killer T cells are one of the body's main lines of defense against pathogens.                               

Zombie Bacteria in Tuberculosis

January 26, 2015 9:50 am | by Ecole Polytechnique Federale De Lausanne | News | Comments

Tuberculosis affects over 12 million people globally, and is usually treated with a course of four drugs over several months.                       

Researchers Solve Metabolic Mystery Lending Insight into Lafora Disease

January 26, 2015 9:32 am | by Elizabeth Adams, University of Kentucky | News | Comments

Scientists have determined how an enzyme essential for energy metabolism functions.                              

Millions of GMO Insects Could Be Released in Florida Keys

January 26, 2015 9:26 am | by Jennifer Kay - Associated Press | News | Comments

Millions of genetically modified mosquitoes could be released in the Florida Keys if British researchers win approval to use the bugs against two extremely painful viral diseases.              

The Molecular Biology Behind ALS

January 23, 2015 4:58 pm | by Brandeis Univ. | News | Comments

By now, most everyone has seen videos all over social media of friends and family dousing themselves in ice cold water as part of the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge.                                                 

Reducing Myc Gene Activity Extends Healthy Lifespan in Mice

January 23, 2015 4:48 pm | by Brown University | News | Comments

A team of scientists based at Brown University has found that reducing expression of a fundamentally important gene called Myc significantly increased the healthy lifespan of laboratory mice, the first such finding regarding this gene in a mammalian species.

Telomere Extension Turns Back Aging Clock in Cultured Human Cells

January 23, 2015 4:44 pm | by Stanford University | News | Comments

A new procedure can quickly and efficiently increase the length of human telomeres, the protective caps on the ends of chromosomes that are linked to aging and disease.                

Why Protein Mutations Lead to Parkinson's Disease

January 22, 2015 4:29 pm | by UCSD | News | Comments

A new study has shown for the first time why protein mutations lead to the familial form of Parkinson’s disease.                         

President Obama Announces Precision Medicine Initiative

January 22, 2015 12:32 pm | by Ryan Bushey, Associate Editor | Articles | Comments

The President briefly mentioned the project during the State of The Union earlier this week.                            

Moving Closer to a Personalized Treatment Solution for Intellectual Disability

January 22, 2015 10:36 am | by Scripps Research Institute | News | Comments

Scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have produced an approach that protects animal models against a type of genetic disruption that causes intellectual disability, including serious memory impairments and altered anxiety levels.

New Cellular Pathway Triggering Allergic Asthma Response Identified

January 20, 2015 10:25 am | by UC San Diego | News | Comments

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine, with collaborators in Korea and Scotland, have identified a novel signaling pathway critical to the immune response of cells associated with the initiation of allergic asthma.         

Scientists Find How Many Cancers May Evade Treatment

January 16, 2015 10:54 am | by University of Wisconsin-Madison | News | Comments

The drugs were designed to keep cancer cells at bay by preventing their growth, survival and spread. Yet, after clinical trials, they left scientists scratching their heads and drug developers watching their investments succumb to cancer’s latest triumph.

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