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Researchers Discover New Clues for Treatment of Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria

February 25, 2015 10:08 am | by James Hataway, UGA | News | Comments

Researchers have identified a previously unknown process that many bacteria, including those that cause disease in humans, use to survive. Their discovery could lead to new therapies for bacterial infections like MRSA and tuberculosis that are resistant to current antibiotic treatments.

DNA Transcription Sheds Light on Cancer Pathogenesis

February 24, 2015 12:35 pm | by Nora Dunne, Northwestern University | News | Comments

Transcription, the process in which genetic information from DNA is copied into RNA to produce proteins, requires many pieces coming together.                    

Nano-Spies Force Tumors to Reveal Themselves

February 24, 2015 9:57 am | by Bruce Goldman, Stanford University | News | Comments

Investigators administered a customized genetic construct consisting of tiny rings of DNA, called DNA minicircles, to mice.                       

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Obesity Genes Identified by Worldwide Research Team

February 24, 2015 9:43 am | by Queensland University of Technology | News | Comments

A massive worldwide analysis of genetic data from almost 340,000 people around the world has brought understanding of the genetic basis of obesity a step closer.                

Study Shows Destroying Material That Cloaks Cancer Cells Could Benefit Patients

February 24, 2015 9:31 am | by Translational Genomics Research Institute | News | Comments

Like a stealth jet cloaks itself from radar, cancer cells cloak themselves within tumors by hiding behind a dense layer of cellular material known as stroma.                 

Evolving a Bigger Brain With Human DNA

February 20, 2015 4:40 pm | by Duke Univ. | News | Comments

The size of the human brain expanded dramatically during the course of evolution, imparting us with unique capabilities to use abstract language and do complex math. But how did the human brain get larger than that of our closest living relative, the chimpanzee, if almost all of our genes are the same?

New ALS Gene and Signaling Pathways Identified

February 20, 2015 4:37 pm | News | Comments

Using advanced DNA sequencing methods, researchers have identified a new gene that is associated with sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), or Lou Gehrig’s disease.                       

FDA Grants 23andMe to Market First Direct-to-Consumer Genetic Test

February 20, 2015 4:33 pm | by 23andMe | News | Comments

23andMe, Inc., the leading personal genetics company, today announced that it has been granted authority by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to market the first direct-to-consumer genetic test under a regulatory classification for novel devices.

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Cancer Risk Linked to DNA 'Wormholes'

February 19, 2015 11:59 am | by Institute of Cancer Research | News | Comments

Single-letter genetic variations within parts of the genome once dismissed as ‘junk DNA’ can increase cancer risk through 'wormhole-like' effects on far-off genes, new research shows.             

Camel, Alpaca Antibodies Target Anticancer Viruses Directly to Tumors

February 19, 2015 11:49 am | by Julia Evangelou Strait, WUSTL | News | Comments

Using antibodies from camels and alpacas, scientists have found a way to deliver anticancer viruses directly to tumor cells, leaving other types of cells uninfected.                

Keeping Atherosclerosis in Check with Novel Targeted Nanomedicines

February 19, 2015 11:42 am | by Columbia University | News | Comments

Nanometer-sized “drones” that deliver a special type of healing molecule to fat deposits in arteries could become a new way to prevent heart attacks caused by atherosclerosis.              

Auditory Pain Pathway May Protect Against Hearing Loss

February 19, 2015 11:37 am | by Marla Paul, Northwestern University | News | Comments

Our hearing has a secret bodyguard: a newly discovered connection from the cochlea to the brain that warns of intense incoming noise that causes tissue damage and hearing loss.              

NIH-Supported Researchers Map Epigenome of More than 100 Tissue, Cell Types

February 18, 2015 12:23 pm | by NIH | News | Comments

Much like mapping the human genome laid the foundations for understanding the genetic basis of human health, new maps of the human epigenome may further unravel the complex links between DNA and disease. The epigenome is part of the machinery that helps direct how genes are turned off and on in different types of cells.

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Mothers Can Pass Traits to Offspring Through Bacteria's DNA

February 17, 2015 4:14 pm | by Michael C. Purdy, Washington University in St. Louis | News | Comments

Bacteria are most familiar through their roles in harmful infections. But scientists have realized that such bacteria are only a tiny fraction of the bacterial communities that live in and on our bodies. Most bacteria are commensal, which means they do not cause harm and often confer benefits.

Two Cell-Signaling Molecules Found to Suppress the Spread of Melanoma

February 17, 2015 10:21 am | by NYU Langone | News | Comments

Findings advance efforts to identify who would benefit from more aggressive therapy at earliest stages.                          

Molecular Inhibitor Breaks Cycle That Leads to Alzheimer's

February 17, 2015 10:15 am | by University of Cambridge | News | Comments

A molecule that can block the progress of Alzheimer’s disease at a crucial stage in its development has been identified by researchers in a new study, raising the prospect that more such molecules may now be found.        

Taking Technology from the Lab to the Patient

February 17, 2015 10:06 am | by Anne Trafton, MIT | News | Comments

A MIT researcher wants to bring advances in drug delivery and biomaterials to the clinic.                            

Researchers Discover Molecular Trigger of IBD

February 17, 2015 10:00 am | by Duke University | News | Comments

Cells lining the intestinal tract form a critical barrier, protecting our bodies from the billions of bacteria living in the gut.                      

Search Engine Helps Predict Gene Function

February 13, 2015 3:27 pm | by Kimberlee D'Ardenne, Stanford University | News | Comments

The Human Genome Project wrapped up over a decade ago, yet around a third of the genome remains mysterious, its function unknown.                      

Aggressive Form of HIV Uncovered in Cuba

February 12, 2015 2:42 pm | by University of Leuven | News | Comments

Engaging in unprotected sex with multiple partners increases the risk of contracting multiple strains of HIV, the virus that causes AIDS. Once inside a host, these strains can recombine into a new variant of the virus.       

Microbes Prevent Malnutrition in Fruit Flies - Maybe Humans, too

February 12, 2015 2:33 pm | by The Scripps Research Institute | News | Comments

Microbes, small and ancient life forms, play a key role in maintaining life on Earth. As has often been pointed out, without microbes, we’d die—without us, most microbes would get along just fine.           

Tiny Fish Makes Big Splash in Aging Research

February 12, 2015 2:21 pm | by Krista Conger, Stanford School of Medicine | News | Comments

This accelerated life cycle is a necessity when one makes one’s home in seasonal ponds that regularly evaporate, and the fact that the fish shares many biological characteristics with humans makes it a promising candidate for the study of aging and longevity. But until now, scientists didn’t have the necessary tools and information with which to conduct genetic studies.

Sequence of Genetic Mutations Determines How Cancer Behaves

February 12, 2015 10:15 am | News | Comments

Most of the genetic mutations that cause cancer result from environmental ‘damage’ (for example, through smoking or as a result of over-exposure to sunlight) or from spontaneous errors as cells divide. 

Serotonin-Deficient Brains More Vulnerable to Social Stress

February 10, 2015 5:17 pm | by Duke University | News | Comments

Mice genetically deficient in serotonin—a crucial brain chemical implicated in clinical depression—are more vulnerable than their normal littermates to social stressors, according to a Duke study appearing this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

New Cellular Pathway Defect in Cystinosis

February 10, 2015 4:41 pm | by Scripps Research Institute | News | Comments

Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have identified a new cellular pathway that is affected in cystinosis, a rare genetic disorder that can result in eye and kidney damage.                                 

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