Advertisement
Genomics
Subscribe to Genomics
View Sample

FREE Email Newsletter

Mice and Men Share a Diabetes Gene

September 11, 2014 3:31 pm | News | Comments

A new study has identified a pathological process that takes place in both mice and humans towards one of the most common diseases that people face in the industrialized world: type 2 diabetes.                 

23andMe Navigates Health Regulation

September 11, 2014 10:35 am | by Matthew Perrone - AP Health Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

Last November, the Food and Drug Administration ordered the company to stop marketing its personalized health reports, which purported to tell customers if they were genetically predisposed to more than 250 diseases and medical conditions. Now, 23andMe is working to win FDA clearance for its health tests one at a time.

Team Finds Ovarian Cancer Oncogene in 'Junk DNA'

September 9, 2014 3:43 pm | News | Comments

Over the years researchers have made tremendous strides in the understanding and treatment of cancer by searching genomes for links between genetic alterations and disease. Now, a team of researchers has mined "junk DNA" sequences to identify a non-protein-coding RNA whose expression is linked to ovarian cancer.

Advertisement

Intelligence Inheritance: 3 Genes That Add to IQ Score

September 9, 2014 1:43 pm | News | Comments

New research published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science (PNAS) shows three genetic variants in humans that can account for a couple of IQ points– but before you get excited, these are only three variants out of likely thousands.

Single Cell Smashes, Rebuilds Its Own Genome

September 8, 2014 3:52 pm | News | Comments

Life can be so intricate and novel that even a single cell can pack a few surprises, according to a new study. The pond-dwelling, single-celled organism Oxytricha trifallax has the remarkable ability to break its own DNA into nearly a quarter-million pieces and rapidly reassemble those pieces when it's time to mate, the study says.

Aging Process Delayed by ‘Remote Control’

September 8, 2014 3:45 pm | News | Comments

Biologists have identified a gene that can slow the aging process throughout the entire body when activated remotely in key organ systems.                                 

Nature or Nurture? It’s All About the Message

September 5, 2014 1:53 pm | News | Comments

Were Albert Einstein and Leonardo da Vinci born brilliant or did they acquire their intelligence through effort? No one knows for sure, but telling people the latter– that hard work trumps genes– causes instant changes in the brain and may make them more willing to strive for success, indicates a new study.

Messenger Molecules a Part of Arthritis Puzzle

September 4, 2014 2:05 pm | News | Comments

The way in which some cells alter their behavior at the onset of osteoarthritis has been identified for the first time. Researchers found that changes in the rate at which molecules in joint cartilage called mRNA are created and destroyed are fundamental to causing this change in behavior.

Advertisement

Researchers ID New, Rare Neuromuscular Disease

September 4, 2014 1:20 pm | News | Comments

An international team of researchers has identified a new inherited neuromuscular disorder. The rare condition is the result of a genetic mutation that interferes with the communication between nerves and muscles, resulting in impaired muscle control.

From Nose to Knee: Engineered Cartilage Regenerates Joints

August 29, 2014 8:30 am | News | Comments

Researchers report that cells taken from the nasal septum are able to adapt to the environment of the knee joint and can thus repair articular cartilage defects. Read more...                     

Genomic Sequencing Reveals Insights into Ebola Outbreak

August 29, 2014 8:30 am | News | Comments

In response to an ongoing, unprecedented outbreak of Ebola virus disease (EVD) in West Africa, a team of researchers has rapidly sequenced and analyzed more than 99 Ebola virus genomes.                   

Scientists Link Alcohol-dependence Gene to Neurotransmitter

August 28, 2014 8:30 am | News | Comments

Scientists have solved the mystery of why a specific signaling pathway can be associated with alcohol dependence. This signaling pathway is regulated by a gene, called neurofibromatosis type 1 (Nf1), which is linked with excessive drinking in mice.

‘Editing Marks’ Mapped on Fly, Worm, Human Genomes

August 28, 2014 8:30 am | News | Comments

A multi-institution research network has published three major papers that map and compare the genomes and epigenomes of humans and two model organisms, the fly, Drosophila melanogaster, and the worm, Caenorhabditis elegans, in unprecedented detail.

Advertisement

Attacking a Rare Disease at its Source with Gene Therapy

August 28, 2014 8:30 am | News | Comments

Using an animal model, a research team has proven the efficacy of a more elegant way to treat the rare disease MPS I through direct gene transfer.                              

BST This Week #11: Obesity Linked to Heightened Dementia Risk

August 27, 2014 11:29 am | Videos | Comments

On this episode of Bioscience Technology This Week, Christina Jakubowski highlights the link between mid-life obesity and an increased dementia risk later in life. Our second story focuses on researchers who are sequencing salamander genomes.   

Cancer Leaves a Common Fingerprint on DNA

August 26, 2014 1:45 pm | News | Comments

Regardless of their stage or type, cancers appear to share a telltale signature of widespread changes to the so-called epigenome, according to a team of researchers. In a study of a broad variety of cancers the investigators say they have found widespread and distinctive changes to chemical marks known as methyl groups attached to DNA.

Crohn's Gene Discovery May Lead to Better Screening

August 26, 2014 1:23 pm | News | Comments

Scientists have identified chemical changes in the DNA of patients with Crohn’s disease that could help to screen people for the disease. These changes can be detected in blood samples, opening the door to a simple test for Crohn’s disease.    

New Approach Helps to Identify Cancer 'Drivers'

August 25, 2014 1:13 pm | News | Comments

Researchers have developed a new integrated approach to pinpoint the genetic “drivers” of cancer, uncovering eight genes that could be viable for targeted breast cancer therapy.                     

BST This Week #10: Gene Mutation Key to High-Altitude Living

August 22, 2014 1:38 pm | Videos | Comments

On this episode of Bioscience Technology This Week, Christina Jakubowski covers a genetic mutation that allows high-altitude-dwelling Tibetans to survive in the peaks of the Tibetan Plateau. Our second story looks at how minor infections increase stroke risk in children.

Skin Cells Reprogrammed to Mimic Rare Disease

August 22, 2014 11:38 am | News | Comments

Stem cell biologists have found a way to reprogram a patient’s skin cells into cells that mimic and display many biological features of a rare genetic disorder called familial dysautonomia.                  

Test Reliably Detects Inherited Immune Deficiency

August 21, 2014 10:24 am | News | Comments

A newborn screening test for severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) reliably identifies infants with this life-threatening inherited condition, leading to prompt treatment and high survival rates, according to a new study.        

BST This Week #9: Can Sweat Power Your Smartphone?

August 20, 2014 2:48 pm | Videos | Comments

On this episode of Bioscience Technology This Week, Christina Jakubowski highlights the possibility of using small sensors as biobatteries that can harvest power from sweat. Our second story covers a newly discovered plant “language."     

Gene Predicts Breast Cancer Relapse, Response to Chemo

August 20, 2014 12:29 pm | News | Comments

Scientists have made it easier to predict both breast cancer relapses and responses to chemotherapy, through the identification of a unique gene, a new study shows.                         

DNA Sequencing Spots Genetic Key to Lupus

August 19, 2014 12:30 pm | News | Comments

Medical researchers have used DNA sequencing to identify a gene variant responsible for causing lupus in a young patient. The development shows that, for the first time, it is feasible for researchers to identify the individual causes of lupus in patients by using DNA sequencing.

Reactivated Gene Sets Immune System Back 500M Years

August 19, 2014 11:37 am | News | Comments

A single factor can reset the immune system of mice to a state likely similar to what it was 500 million years ago. Scientists reactivated expression of an ancient gene in mice, which is not normally expressed in the mammalian immune system, and found that the animals developed a fish-like thymus.

X
You may login with either your assigned username or your e-mail address.
The password field is case sensitive.
Loading