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Genetic Clue Points to Most Vulnerable Children

January 7, 2015 9:32 am | by Duke University | News | Comments

Some children are more sensitive to their environments, for better and for worse. Now Duke University researchers have identified a gene variant that may serve as a marker for these children, who are among society’s most vulnerable.  

How Bacteria Control Their Size

January 7, 2015 9:21 am | by WUSTL | News | Comments

Scientists have traditionally studied bacteria in large numbers, not individually. Working with tens of millions of cells in a culture flask, they tracked their growth by looking at how much the cells dimmed light passing through a tube.

Genome Editing Tool Shows Promise in Engineering Human Stem Cells

January 5, 2015 4:21 pm | by Johns Hopkins University | News | Comments

Scientists discovered that a genome editing tool can precisely and efficiently alter human stem cells.                        

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Researchers Study Potential Blood Test for Prostate Cancer

January 5, 2015 4:11 pm | by Vanderbilt University | News | Comments

Vanderbilt University researcher William Mitchell, M.D., Ph.D., and colleagues in Germany and Canada have demonstrated a method for detecting “cell-free” tumor DNA in the bloodstream.                            

New Clues Why Older Women Are More Susceptible to Breast Cancer

January 5, 2015 3:48 pm | by Skip Derra, Contributing Writer | Articles | Comments

The idea that breast cancer becomes more prevalent with age is fairly well established, but the reasons why are still uncertain. Now, scientists from the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have new insights into why older women are more susceptible to breast cancer.

Connecting Cellular Aging to Human Aging

January 2, 2015 1:59 pm | by Nora Dunne, Northwestern University | News | Comments

A study has linked aging at the cellular level to overall human aging through a molecular interaction involving two proteins and chromosome ends called telomeres.                 

Enzyme's Alter Ego Helps Activate Helps Activate the Immune System

December 29, 2014 5:08 pm | by Johns Hopkins University | News | Comments

These findings could shed light on related Alzheimer's protein.                                 

Optogenetics Captures Neuronal Transmission in Live Mammalian Brain

December 26, 2014 10:04 am | News | Comments

Swiss scientists have used a cutting-edge method to stimulate neurons with light. They have successfully recorded synaptic transmission between neurons in a live animal for the first time.                                         

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Scientists Create Precursor to Human Egg and Sperm

December 26, 2014 9:24 am | by University of Cambridge | News | Comments

Scientists have created primordial germ cells – cells that will go on to become egg and sperm – using human embryonic stem cells.                      

Locking Mechanism Found for 'Scissors' That Cut DNA

December 26, 2014 9:16 am | by Johns Hopkins University | News | Comments

Researchers discovered what keeps an enzyme from becoming overzealous in its clipping of DNA.                            

Bacteria 'Factories' Churn Out Valuable Chemicals

December 26, 2014 9:12 am | by Kat J. McAlpine, Harvard Gazette | News | Comments

A team of researchers has made big strides toward a future in which the predominant chemical factories of the world are colonies of genetically engineered bacteria.                

Researchers Shed Light on How 'Microbial Dark Matter' May Cause Disease

December 24, 2014 9:20 am | by UCLA | News | Comments

One of the great recent discoveries in modern biology was that the human body contains 10 times more bacterial cells than human cells. But much of that bacteria is still a puzzle to scientists.           

New Cell Marking Technique to Help Understand How Our Brain Works

December 22, 2014 4:23 pm | by University of Southampton | News | Comments

Scientists have color marked individual brain cells to help improve our understanding of how the brain works.                         

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Scientists Discover Gene Critical for Proper Brain Development

December 22, 2014 10:36 am | News | Comments

  Scientists at A*STAR's Institute of Medical Biology (IMB) and Institute of Molecular and Cellular Biology (IMCB) have identified a genetic pathway that accounts for the extraordinary size of the human brain.                                         

Considering Whole Genome Sequencing for Newborns

December 18, 2014 5:16 pm | by Nora Dunne, Northwestern University | News | Comments

A recent exploratory study asked genetics experts to consider genome sequencing for newborn populations, revealing varying opinions about the future of genomics.                  

Healthy Brain Development Balanced on Edge of Cellular 'Sword'

December 18, 2014 5:09 pm | by Bill Hathaway, Yale University | News | Comments

A new Yale-led study of children with neurodevelopmental abnormalities of the brain identifies a “cutting” enzyme crucial to the shaping and division of brain cells as well as the replenishment of neural stem cells.        

Serotonin Neuron Subtypes

December 18, 2014 4:37 pm | by Stephanie Dutchen, Harvard Medical School | News | Comments

Neuroscientists have proposed that brain cells come in different subtypes that have different properties and responsibilities.                     

New Findings Demonstrate Effective Treatment for Diabetes Patients

December 18, 2014 4:23 pm | by University of Pennsylvania | News | Comments

Scientists have found a new way to help Type 1 diabetes patients defend themselves against life-threatening low blood sugar.                       

'Master Regulator' Gene Can Stimulate Other Genes in Early Brain Development

December 18, 2014 4:10 pm | by NYU | News | Comments

Chemical modifications to DNA’s packaging — known as epigenetic changes — can activate or repress genes involved in autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) and early brain development.              

'Hairclip' Protein Mechanism Explained

December 18, 2014 3:57 pm | by University of Cambridge | News | Comments

New research has identified a fundamental mechanism for controlling protein function.                              

Team Creates Method for Probing How Molecules Fold

December 18, 2014 3:46 pm | News | Comments

Scientists have developed a powerful new system for studying how proteins and other biological molecules form and lose their natural folded structures.                  

Gene-Editing Guide

December 17, 2014 4:42 pm | by Sue McGreevy, Harvard University | News | Comments

Investigators have developed a method for detecting unwanted DNA breaks—across the entire genome of human cells—induced by the popular gene-editing tools called CRISPR-Cas RNA-guided nucleases (RGNs).          

New Lens-Free Microscope Detects Cancer At Cellular Level

December 17, 2014 4:27 pm | by UCLA | News | Comments

Researchers have developed a lens-free microscope that can be used to detect the presence of cancer or other cell-level abnormalities with the same accuracy as larger and more expensive optical microscopes.         

UK Proposes Rules for Embryos Made From 3 People

December 17, 2014 2:53 pm | by Maria Cheng - AP Chief Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

New rules proposed in Britain would make it the first country to allow embryos to be made from the DNA of three people in order to prevent mothers from passing on potentially fatal genetic diseases to their babies.        

DNA Sheds Light on Why Largest Lemurs Disappeared

December 17, 2014 10:25 am | by Duke University | News | Comments

Ancient DNA extracted from the bones and teeth of giant lemurs that lived thousands of years ago in Madagascar may help explain why the giant lemurs went extinct. It also explains what factors make some surviving species more at risk today, says a study in the Journal of Human Evolution.

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