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Upending Alzheimer's Theory

March 4, 2015 4:48 pm | by Sue McGreevy, Harvard University | News | Comments

A study reveals for the first time exactly how mutations associated with the most common form of inherited Alzheimer’s disease produce the disorder’s devastating effects.              

Mouse Study Finds Extra Oxygen May Spur Tumor-Fighting Cells

March 4, 2015 4:35 pm | by Lauran Neergaard, AP Medical Writer | News | Comments

A provocative study in mice suggests something as simple as breathing in extra oxygen might give immune cells a boost in attacking cancer.                    

Automated Next Generation Sequencing Applications

March 4, 2015 4:30 pm | Product Releases | Comments

Beckman Coulter Life Sciences, through a partnership with Illumina, offers automated methods to improve processes and throughput in next generation sequencing (NGS) sample preparation. Under the agreement, Beckman Coulter will use its experience in automated NGS sample preparation to develop, distribute and support automation for Illumina’s TruSeq and Nextera sample preparation kits and Illumina will provide technical expertise on chemistry and protocols.

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Protein May Be Key to Cancer's Deadly Resurgences

March 3, 2015 4:29 pm | by Pete Farley, University of California San Francisco | News | Comments

Tumor recurrence following a period of remission is the main cause of death in cancer. The ability of cancer cells to remain dormant during and following therapy, only to be reactivated at a later time, frequently with greater aggressiveness, is one of the least-understood aspects of the disease.

New Nanodevice Defeats Drug Resistance

March 3, 2015 10:33 am | by Anne Trafton, MIT | News | Comments

Tiny particles embedded in gel can turn off drug-resistance genes, then release cancer drugs.                            

Neurons Controlling Appetite Made from Skin Cells

March 3, 2015 9:59 am | by Columbia University Medical Center | News | Comments

Cells  provide individualized model for studying obesity and testing treatments.                             

Genetically Speaking, Mammals are More Like Dad

March 3, 2015 9:14 am | by UNC | News | Comments

You might resemble or act more like your mother, but a novel research study from UNC School of Medicine researchers reveals that mammals are genetically more like their dads.              

A Gene for Brain Size - Only Found in Humans

March 2, 2015 9:56 am | by Max Planck Institute | News | Comments

Following the traces of evolution: researches find a key to the reproduction of brain stem cells                           

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New Target Identified in Fight Against Alzheimer's, Multiple Sclerosis

March 2, 2015 9:24 am | by Michael C. Purdy, Washington University in St. Louis | News | Comments

Highlighting a potential target in the treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS) and Alzheimer’s disease, new research suggests that triggering a protein found on the surface of brain cells may help slow the progression of these and other neurological diseases.

Newly-Found T Memory Stem Cells May Be Key to Gene Therapy

February 27, 2015 10:41 am | by Cynthia Fox, Science Writer | Articles | Comments

Genetically engineered T memory stem cells (Tscm) can last more than 12 years in patients’ bodies, and can continually generate appropriate T cell armies for them, says an innovative study looking at two historic clinical trials.     

New Molecule Could Slow Progression of Parkinson's

February 26, 2015 10:22 am | by University of Bath | News | Comments

Researchers have designed a molecule that, if developed into a drug, could slow the progression of Parkinson's Disease.                       

Unique Tags Identify Individual Yeast Families

February 26, 2015 10:05 am | by Krista Conger, Stanford School of Medicine | News | Comments

A technique developed by researchers has implications for understanding how cancer cells evolve as a tumor grows or how a virus spreads and changes during an infection.                  

A New Understanding of Alzheimer's

February 26, 2015 9:46 am | by Peter Reuell, Harvard Gazette | News | Comments

Findings point to role of natural selection in disease.                                  

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UK First Country to Allow Creation of Embryos from Three People

February 25, 2015 10:21 am | by Maria Cheng, AP Medical Writer | News | Comments

The bill granting the controversial techniques was passed Tuesday by the House of Lords, after being approved earlier this month by the House of Commons.                  

Researchers Discover New Clues for Treatment of Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria

February 25, 2015 10:08 am | by James Hataway, UGA | News | Comments

Researchers have identified a previously unknown process that many bacteria, including those that cause disease in humans, use to survive. Their discovery could lead to new therapies for bacterial infections like MRSA and tuberculosis that are resistant to current antibiotic treatments.

DNA Transcription Sheds Light on Cancer Pathogenesis

February 24, 2015 12:35 pm | by Nora Dunne, Northwestern University | News | Comments

Transcription, the process in which genetic information from DNA is copied into RNA to produce proteins, requires many pieces coming together.                    

Nano-Spies Force Tumors to Reveal Themselves

February 24, 2015 9:57 am | by Bruce Goldman, Stanford University | News | Comments

Investigators administered a customized genetic construct consisting of tiny rings of DNA, called DNA minicircles, to mice.                       

Obesity Genes Identified by Worldwide Research Team

February 24, 2015 9:43 am | by Queensland University of Technology | News | Comments

A massive worldwide analysis of genetic data from almost 340,000 people around the world has brought understanding of the genetic basis of obesity a step closer.                

Study Shows Destroying Material That Cloaks Cancer Cells Could Benefit Patients

February 24, 2015 9:31 am | by Translational Genomics Research Institute | News | Comments

Like a stealth jet cloaks itself from radar, cancer cells cloak themselves within tumors by hiding behind a dense layer of cellular material known as stroma.                 

Evolving a Bigger Brain With Human DNA

February 20, 2015 4:40 pm | by Duke Univ. | News | Comments

The size of the human brain expanded dramatically during the course of evolution, imparting us with unique capabilities to use abstract language and do complex math. But how did the human brain get larger than that of our closest living relative, the chimpanzee, if almost all of our genes are the same?

New ALS Gene and Signaling Pathways Identified

February 20, 2015 4:37 pm | News | Comments

Using advanced DNA sequencing methods, researchers have identified a new gene that is associated with sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), or Lou Gehrig’s disease.                       

FDA Grants 23andMe to Market First Direct-to-Consumer Genetic Test

February 20, 2015 4:33 pm | by 23andMe | News | Comments

23andMe, Inc., the leading personal genetics company, today announced that it has been granted authority by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to market the first direct-to-consumer genetic test under a regulatory classification for novel devices.

Cancer Risk Linked to DNA 'Wormholes'

February 19, 2015 11:59 am | by Institute of Cancer Research | News | Comments

Single-letter genetic variations within parts of the genome once dismissed as ‘junk DNA’ can increase cancer risk through 'wormhole-like' effects on far-off genes, new research shows.             

Camel, Alpaca Antibodies Target Anticancer Viruses Directly to Tumors

February 19, 2015 11:49 am | by Julia Evangelou Strait, WUSTL | News | Comments

Using antibodies from camels and alpacas, scientists have found a way to deliver anticancer viruses directly to tumor cells, leaving other types of cells uninfected.                

Keeping Atherosclerosis in Check with Novel Targeted Nanomedicines

February 19, 2015 11:42 am | by Columbia University | News | Comments

Nanometer-sized “drones” that deliver a special type of healing molecule to fat deposits in arteries could become a new way to prevent heart attacks caused by atherosclerosis.              

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