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Molecular Inhibitor Breaks Cycle That Leads to Alzheimer's

February 17, 2015 10:15 am | by University of Cambridge | News | Comments

A molecule that can block the progress of Alzheimer’s disease at a crucial stage in its development has been identified by researchers in a new study, raising the prospect that more such molecules may now be found.        

Taking Technology from the Lab to the Patient

February 17, 2015 10:06 am | by Anne Trafton, MIT | News | Comments

A MIT researcher wants to bring advances in drug delivery and biomaterials to the clinic.                            

Researchers Discover Molecular Trigger of IBD

February 17, 2015 10:00 am | by Duke University | News | Comments

Cells lining the intestinal tract form a critical barrier, protecting our bodies from the billions of bacteria living in the gut.                      

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Search Engine Helps Predict Gene Function

February 13, 2015 3:27 pm | by Kimberlee D'Ardenne, Stanford University | News | Comments

The Human Genome Project wrapped up over a decade ago, yet around a third of the genome remains mysterious, its function unknown.                      

Aggressive Form of HIV Uncovered in Cuba

February 12, 2015 2:42 pm | by University of Leuven | News | Comments

Engaging in unprotected sex with multiple partners increases the risk of contracting multiple strains of HIV, the virus that causes AIDS. Once inside a host, these strains can recombine into a new variant of the virus.       

Microbes Prevent Malnutrition in Fruit Flies - Maybe Humans, too

February 12, 2015 2:33 pm | by The Scripps Research Institute | News | Comments

Microbes, small and ancient life forms, play a key role in maintaining life on Earth. As has often been pointed out, without microbes, we’d die—without us, most microbes would get along just fine.           

Tiny Fish Makes Big Splash in Aging Research

February 12, 2015 2:21 pm | by Krista Conger, Stanford School of Medicine | News | Comments

This accelerated life cycle is a necessity when one makes one’s home in seasonal ponds that regularly evaporate, and the fact that the fish shares many biological characteristics with humans makes it a promising candidate for the study of aging and longevity. But until now, scientists didn’t have the necessary tools and information with which to conduct genetic studies.

Sequence of Genetic Mutations Determines How Cancer Behaves

February 12, 2015 10:15 am | News | Comments

Most of the genetic mutations that cause cancer result from environmental ‘damage’ (for example, through smoking or as a result of over-exposure to sunlight) or from spontaneous errors as cells divide. 

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Serotonin-Deficient Brains More Vulnerable to Social Stress

February 10, 2015 5:17 pm | by Duke University | News | Comments

Mice genetically deficient in serotonin—a crucial brain chemical implicated in clinical depression—are more vulnerable than their normal littermates to social stressors, according to a Duke study appearing this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

New Cellular Pathway Defect in Cystinosis

February 10, 2015 4:41 pm | by Scripps Research Institute | News | Comments

Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have identified a new cellular pathway that is affected in cystinosis, a rare genetic disorder that can result in eye and kidney damage.                                 

Coral Snake Venom Reveals Unique Route to Lethality

February 10, 2015 9:34 am | by Johns Hopkins University | News | Comments

A vial of rare snake venom refused to give up its secret formula for lethality; its toxins had no effect on the proteins that most venoms target.                   

Persevering Past Roadblocks to Build Promising Ebola Vaccine

February 10, 2015 9:08 am | by Lauran Neergard - AP Medical Writer | News | Comments

Ebola has claimed nearly 9,000 lives in West Africa over the past year, although new infections have dropped dramatically in recent months.                    

Next-Gen Sequencing Maps 'Highly Degraded' DNA

February 6, 2015 12:46 pm | by Sean Alloca, Editor, Forensic Magazine | Articles | Comments

Next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology can now profile highly damaged DNA samples that contain 75 percent less base-pair information, compared with previous systems. This is a significant improvement for law enforcement in cases involving missing persons or unidentified human remains.

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Key Process Identified in Brain Development

February 6, 2015 12:29 pm | by Ziba Kashef, Yale University | News | Comments

MicroRNA are the tiny non-coding RNA molecules that help determine whether genes are expressed or silenced.                           

Cow Immune System Inspires Potential New Therapies

February 6, 2015 12:19 pm | by The Scripps Research Institute | News | Comments

Scientists have developed a potential new therapy based on an unlikely model: immune molecules from cows.                          

Evaluating Strategies for HIV Vaccinations

February 6, 2015 12:08 pm | by Anne Trafton, MIT | News | Comments

Researchers have revealed new insights into possible ways to vaccinate people to generate potent antibodies of the type that are predicted to offer protection against diverse strains of the highly mutable HIV.         

A Look at Some Vaccine-Related Legislation in Several States

February 6, 2015 11:50 am | by Associated Press | News | Comments

Several state legislatures are debating vaccine-related measures as dozens of people have fallen ill from a measles outbreak that started at Disneyland in December and spread beyond the theme park.           

Paper Test for Ebola

February 4, 2015 3:19 pm | by Elizabeth Cooney, Harvard Medical School | News | Comments

A team of researchers are working on a diagnostic machine that can detect Ebola virus and other dangerous microbes.                        

Brain Marker Hints at Depression, Anxiety Years Later

February 4, 2015 3:08 pm | by Duke University | News | Comments

Researchers said they can tell who will become depressed or anxious in response to stressful life events, as far as four years down the road.                    

Scientists Find More DNA and Extra Copies of Disease Gene in Alzheimer's Brain Cells

February 4, 2015 3:02 pm | by The Scripps Research Institute | News | Comments

Scientists have found diverse genomic changes in single neurons from the brains of Alzheimer’s patients, pointing to an unexpected factor that may underpin the most common form of the disease.            

Stem Cell Therapy Shows Promise for MS Patients

February 4, 2015 2:41 pm | by Nora Dunne, Northwestern University | News | Comments

A preliminary study suggests stem cell transplantation may reverse disability and improve quality of life for patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis.                

Fewer Viral Relics May Be Due to a Less Bloody Evolutionary History

February 4, 2015 2:36 pm | by University of Oxford | News | Comments

Humans have fewer remnants of viral DNA in their genes compared to other mammals.                              

Nanoparticle Gene Therapy Treats Brain Cancer in Rats

February 4, 2015 10:01 am | by Johns Hopkins | News | Comments

Despite improvements in the past few decades with surgery, chemotherapy and radiation therapy, a predictably curative treatment for glioma does not yet exist. New insights into specific gene mutations that arise in this often deadly form of brain cancer have pointed to the potential of gene therapy, but it’s very difficult to effectively deliver toxic or missing genes to cancer cells in the brain.

Cancer-focused Array for Malignancies, Tumors

February 3, 2015 1:50 pm | Product Releases | Comments

Oxford Gene Technology (OGT) offers the CytoSure Consortium Cancer +SNP array (4x180k). The array allows the simultaneous detection of copy number variation (CNV) and loss of heterozygosity (LOH), with a SNP resolution that enables reporting of LOH at 10Mb.

Two Genetic Mutations May Interact to Lower Heart Attack Risk

February 3, 2015 1:24 pm | by Ohio State Univ. | News | Comments

Researchers have determined that two mutations on a single gene can interact in a way that lowers the carrier's risk for a heart attack.  The variants are found in a gene called DBH, which regulates an enzyme involved in the conversion of dopamine to norepinephrine - both of which are important chemical messengers and hormones.

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