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Smart Bacteria Help Each Other Survive

August 5, 2014 1:47 pm | News | Comments

The body’s assailants are cleverer than previously thought. New research from Lund University in Sweden shows for the first time how bacteria in the airways can help each other replenish vital iron. The bacteria thereby increase their chances of survival, which can happen at the expense of the person’s health.

Clues to the Aging of Tendons Unlocked

August 5, 2014 1:33 pm | News | Comments

University of Liverpool scientists have examined the mechanisms that cause ageing in the tendons...

Is Europe Putting Cancer Research at Risk?

July 25, 2014 1:53 pm | News | Comments

The European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO) has expressed concern that the proposed EU...

A-maize-ing Double Life of a Genome

July 15, 2014 12:06 pm | News | Comments

Early maize farmers selected for genes that improved the harvesting of sunlight, a new detailed...

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Cancer Risk: Aspirin and Smoking Affect Aging of Genes

July 1, 2014 11:23 am | News | Comments

The risk of developing cancer increases with age. Factors like smoking and regular aspirin use also affect the risk of cancer—although in the opposite sense. Researchers from the University of Basel were now able to show that aspirin use and smoking both influence aging processes of the female genome that are connected to colorectal cancer.

Scientists Break the Genetic Code for Diabetes in Greenland

June 19, 2014 3:35 pm | Videos | Comments

A piece of detective work has mapped a special gene variant among Greenlanders that plays a particularly important role in the development of type 2 diabetes. The results can be used to improve prevention and treatment options for those genetically at-risk.

One Chip, One Dream: The Pursuit of a DNA-powered Lab-on-a-chip

June 4, 2014 1:38 pm | by Christina Jakubowski, News Editor | Articles | Comments

Christofer Toumazou believes he can change the world with his “one chip, one bug – one chip, one drug,” slogan. Nominated for the European Patent Office’s 2014 European Inventor award, he holds a patent for the technology behind a microchip that can analyze DNA within 30 minutes and without a laboratory.

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Making Your Brain Social

February 3, 2014 11:48 am | News | Comments

In many people with autism and other neurodevelopmental disorders, different parts of the brain don’t talk to each other very well. Scientists have now identified, for the first time, a way in which this decreased functional connectivity can come about.

Parkinson Gene: Nerve Growth Factor Halts Mitochondrial Degeneration

January 31, 2014 1:20 pm | News | Comments

Neurodegenerative diseases like Parkinson’s disease involve the death of thousands of neurons in the brain. Nerve growth factors produced by the body, such as GDNF, promote the survival of the neurons; however, clinical tests with GDNF have not yielded in any clear improvements.

Systematic, Genomic Study of Cervical Cancer Completed

December 26, 2013 11:19 am | News | Comments

Researchers from the Boston area, Mexico and Norway have completed a comprehensive genomic analysis of cervical cancer in two patient populations. The study identified recurrent genetic mutations not previously found in cervical cancer, including at least one for which targeted treatments have been approved for other forms of cancer.

Cure or Drug for Dementia Possible by 2025

December 12, 2013 8:30 am | by MARIA CHENG - AP Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

British Prime Minister David Cameron says he hopes to kick-start an international effort to find a cure or effective treatment for dementia by 2025.                              

Princeton to Give Students Unapproved Meningitis Vaccine

November 18, 2013 4:55 pm | by GEOFF MULVIHILL - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

Princeton University officials decided Monday to make available a meningitis vaccine that hasn't been approved in the U.S. to stop the spread of the sometimes deadly disease on campus.                    

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DNA Links Mysterious Yeti to Ancient Polar Bear

October 17, 2013 3:26 pm | by JILL LAWLESS - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

DNA analysis conducted by a British genetics professor suggests that he has solved the mystery of the Abominable Snowman— the elusive ape-like creature of the Himalayas. He thinks it's a bear.               

Computer Models Win Chemistry Nobel

October 9, 2013 11:07 am | by Karl Ritter and Malin Rising, Associated Press | News | Comments

Three U.S.-based scientists won this year's Nobel Prize in chemistry on Wednesday for developing powerful computer models that researchers use to understand complex chemical interactions and create new drugs.           

Shining Stem Cells Reveals How Our Skin is Maintained

August 15, 2013 2:33 pm | News | Comments

All organs in our body rely on stem cells in order to maintain their function. The skin is our largest organ and forms a shield against the environment. New research results from BRIC, University of Copenhagen and Cambridge University, challenge current stem cell models and explains how the skin is maintained throughout life.

Who Benefits from Vitamin D?

August 13, 2013 1:27 pm | News | Comments

Studying the expression of genes that are dependent on vitamin D makes it possible to identify individuals who will benefit from vitamin D supplementation. Population-based studies have shown that vitamin D deficiency may increase the risk for chronic diseases and weaken the body's immune system.

J&J Recalls 32M Contraceptive Packages

June 4, 2013 1:28 pm | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

Johnson & Johnson is conducting a voluntary recall of millions of oral contraceptive packages in 43 countries outside the U.S., but says there's a "very low" risk that the flawed tablets could cause unplanned pregnancies. It's the latest in a series of about 40 product recalls announced by the U.S.-based company since 2009.

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New Respiratory Virus Spreads to Italy

June 1, 2013 2:10 pm | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

Three people were being treated Saturday for a new respiratory virus that is alarming global health officials, in the first cases in Italy, says the country's health ministry. A 45-year-old man who had recently returned from a 40-day visit to Jordan was hospitalized in Tuscany with a high fever, cough and respiratory problems, says the ministry.

Frozen Mammoth Carcass Contains Liquid Blood

May 30, 2013 2:04 pm | by BY VLADIMIR ISACHENKOV - ASSOCIATED PRESS | News | Comments

A perfectly preserved woolly mammoth carcass with liquid blood has been found on a remote Arctic island, fueling hopes of cloning the Ice Age animal, Russian scientists say. The carcass was in such good shape because its lower part was stuck in pure ice, said Semyon Grigoryev, the head of the Mammoth Museum, who led the expedition into the Lyakhovsky Islands off the Siberian coast.

France Confirms Initial Case of SARS-related Virus

May 8, 2013 6:17 am | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

A 65-year-old Frenchman is hospitalized after contracting France's first case of a deadly new respiratory virus related to SARS, and French health authorities say they are trying to find anyone who might have been in contact with him to prevent it from spreading.

Endogenous Antibiotic Exists in the Brain

May 6, 2013 3:39 pm | News | Comments

Scientists have discovered that immune cells in the brain can produce a substance that prevents bacterial growth: Namely, itaconic acid. Until now, biologists had assumed that only certain fungi produced itaconic acid. A team has now shown that even so-called microglial cells in mammals are also capable of producing this acid.

Bacterial Defense System Has Valuable Genes

May 1, 2013 9:45 am | News | Comments

Even bacteria have a kind of “immune system” they use to defend themselves against unwanted intruders– in their case, viruses. Scientists are now able to show that this defense system is much more diverse than previously thought and that it comes in multiple versions.

Ancient DNA Reveals Europe's Genetic History

April 24, 2013 11:56 am | News | Comments

Ancient DNA recovered from a series of skeletons in central Germany up to 7,500 years old has been used to reconstruct the first detailed genetic history of modern Europe. The study reveals a dramatic series of events including major migrations from both Western Europe and Eurasia, and signs of an unexplained genetic turnover about 4000-5000 years ago.

Newly Discovered Genes Can Treat Childhood Arthritis

April 23, 2013 12:03 pm | News | Comments

Scientists have identified 14 new genes which could have important consequences for future treatments of childhood arthritis. Researchers looked at DNA extracted from blood and saliva samples of 2,000 children with childhood arthritis and compared these to healthy people.

Man Dies as UK Measles Epidemic Spreads

April 19, 2013 5:16 pm | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

U.K. authorities say a 25-year-old man is suspected to have died from measles as an epidemic continues to sweep across south Wales. The outbreak has led to more than 800 infections and renewed discussions over the failure of some parents to vaccinate their children against the potentially fatal virus.

Researchers Publish Improved Neanderthal Genome

March 19, 2013 6:32 pm | by FRANK JORDANS - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

Researchers in Germany said Tuesday they have completed the first high-quality sequencing of a Neanderthal genome and are making it freely available online for other scientists to study. The genome produced from remains of a toe bone found in a Siberian cave is far more detailed than a previous Neanderthal genome sequenced three years ago by the same team.

Protein Creation Rate Mystery Solved

March 14, 2013 10:51 am | News | Comments

Scientists have solved a problem that has frustrated biologists for years: Why different parts of proteins are made at different rates.

New Methods Can Prevent Prosthesis Detachment

March 13, 2013 10:43 am | News | Comments

A usual reason for the need to change a prosthesis is its becoming detached from bone. A recent doctoral dissertation has come across several methods with which the adhesion of implants to bone can be improved.

Evolution in the Antibody Factory

March 12, 2013 11:06 am | News | Comments

Immune system B cells play a crucial role in the defence of pathogens: When they detect such an intruder, they produce antibodies that help to combat the enemy. They concurrently and continuously improve these molecules to more precisely recognize the pathogens.

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