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Game Shows Mosquito's-eye View of Malaria

April 24, 2015 10:05 am | by University of Oxford | News | Comments

A new game about the life cycle of malaria that can be played on Android smartphones. Officially launched on World Malaria Day (April 25) The Life Cycle of Malaria is the first game of its kind which tries to visualize the life cycle of the disease in 3-D.

Link Discovery Points to Potential New Alzheimer's Treatment

April 24, 2015 9:50 am | by University of Cambridge | News | Comments

Researchers have identified how proteins that play a key role in Alzheimer’s disease are linked...

Technology Can Transfer Human Emotions to Your Palm Through Air, Say Scientists

April 23, 2015 9:22 am | by University of Sussex | News | Comments

Human emotion can be transferred by technology that stimulates different parts of the hand...

Listen to Your Heart: Why Your Brain May Give Away How Well You Know Yourself

April 22, 2015 11:11 am | by University of Cambridge | News | Comments

“Listen to your heart,” sang Swedish pop group Roxette in the late Eighties. But not everyone is...

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Oldest Ever DNA Sample from Calcified Neanderthal Man

April 17, 2015 1:52 pm | by Sean Alloca, Editor, Forensic Magazine | Articles | Comments

Bones found in an Italian cave over two decades ago might have provided the oldest Neanderthal DNA ever tested.

Mountain Gorilla Genome Study Provides Optimism About Population Numbers

April 14, 2015 10:41 am | by University of Cambridge | News | Comments

An international research project to sequence whole genomes from mountain gorillas has given scientists and conservationists new insight into the impact of population decline on these critically endangered apes. While mountain gorillas are extensively inbred and at risk of extinction, research published today in Science finds more to be optimistic about in their genomes than expected.

Genetic Screening Could Improve Breast Cancer Prevention

April 10, 2015 9:26 am | by The Institute of Cancer Research | News | Comments

A test for a wide range of genetic risk factors could improve doctors’ ability to work out which women are at increased risk of developing breast cancer, a major study of more than 65,000 women has shown.

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Distance Running May Be an Evolutionary ‘Signal’ for Desirable Male Genes

April 9, 2015 10:58 am | by University of Cambridge | News | Comments

New research shows that males with higher ‘reproductive potential’ are better distance runners. This may have been used by females as a reliable signal of high male genetic quality during our hunter-gatherer past, as good runners are more likely to have other traits of good hunters and providers, such as intelligence and generosity.

Playing Music By Professional Musicians Activates Genes For Learning and Memory

March 27, 2015 3:36 pm | by University of Helsinki | News | Comments

Playing music by professional musicians activates genes responsible for brain function and singing of songbirds.

Tuberculosis Research Takes Off

March 25, 2015 10:53 am | by Max Planck Institute | News | Comments

Scientists call for a global strategy for the development of new tuberculosis vaccines.

British DNA Gives Window into Ancient Past

March 19, 2015 3:38 pm | by Malcolm Ritter, AP Science Writer | News | Comments

Genetic samples collected from across the United Kingdom are shedding light on the ancient past, including Viking invasions and a mystery about the arrival of the Anglo-Saxons.

Scientists Grow 'Mini-Lungs' to Aid the Study of Cystic Fibrosis

March 19, 2015 10:40 am | by University of Cambridge | News | Comments

Scientists at the University of Cambridge have successfully created ‘mini-lungs’ using stem cells derived from skin cells of patients with cystic fibrosis, and have shown that these can be used to test potential new drugs for this debilitating lung disease.

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Obese Women 40 percent More Likely to Get Cancer

March 18, 2015 12:00 pm | by Cancer Research UK | News | Comments

Obese women have around a 40 percent greater risk of developing a weight-related cancer in their lifetime than women of a healthy weight, according to new figures* released by Cancer Research UK Tuesday.

Researchers Report New Gene Associated With Thyroid Levels

March 9, 2015 10:01 am | by University of Bristol | News | Comments

Thyroid hormones have important and diverse roles in human health and regulate metabolic rate. Thyroid disease is common (affecting 5-10 per cent of the population) and synthetic thyroid hormones are one of the commonest drug therapies prescribed worldwide.

Million Man Study Examines Long-term Effects of Blocking Inflammation

February 27, 2015 10:07 am | by University of Cambridge | News | Comments

Inflammation - the body's response to damaging stimuli - may have a protective effect against cardiovascular disease, according to a study published in the journal Lancet Diabetes and Endocrinology.          

UK First Country to Allow Creation of Embryos from Three People

February 25, 2015 10:21 am | by Maria Cheng, AP Medical Writer | News | Comments

The bill granting the controversial techniques was passed Tuesday by the House of Lords, after being approved earlier this month by the House of Commons.                  

Scientists Report Bionic Hand Resconstruction in Three Austrian Men

February 25, 2015 9:20 am | by Maria Cheng, AP Medical Writer | News | Comments

Three Austrians have replaced injured hands with bionic ones that they can control using nerves and muscles transplanted into their arms from their legs.                              

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Cancer Risk Linked to DNA 'Wormholes'

February 19, 2015 11:59 am | by Institute of Cancer Research | News | Comments

Single-letter genetic variations within parts of the genome once dismissed as ‘junk DNA’ can increase cancer risk through 'wormhole-like' effects on far-off genes, new research shows.             

Disruption in Brain Signals Shed New Light on Melancholic Depression

February 19, 2015 11:54 am | by University of New South Wales | News | Comments

Researchers have identified a distinctive brain signature in people with melancholic depression, supporting calls for its classification as a unique mood disorder type.               

Protein Clue to Sudden Cardiac Death

February 17, 2015 3:56 pm | by Oxford University | News | Comments

A protein has been shown to have a surprising role in regulating the 'glue' that holds heart cells together, a finding that may explain how a gene defect could cause sudden cardiac death.            

Impact of Obesity on Fertility Can be Reversed

February 10, 2015 8:56 am | by University of Adelaide | News | Comments

Researchers have revealed how damage from obesity is passed from a mother to her children, and also how that damage can be reversed.                      

Hydrogen Sulfide Could Help Lower Blood Pressure

January 29, 2015 3:00 pm | by University of Exeter | News | Comments

Research has indicated that a new compound, called AP39, which generates minute quantities of the gas hydrogen sulfide inside cells.                      

New Information on Relatively Unknown Blood Borne Bacteria

January 20, 2015 3:39 pm | by University of Bristol | News | Comments

Haemoplasmas are a group of blood borne bacteria found in a wide range of mammals, including domestic and wild cats, and can cause severe anaemia. The findings of a new study have significantly advanced researchers’ knowledge of immunity for these pathogens.

Ebola Patient in Britain Transferred to London

December 30, 2014 3:52 pm | by Associated Press | News | Comments

A British health care worker who contracted the Ebola virus in West Africa has been transferred from Scotland to an isolation unit in London for specialist treatment.                          

Researchers: IMF Policies Hindered Ebola Response

December 30, 2014 3:47 pm | by Michelle Faul - Associated Press | News | Comments

Professors from three leading British universities say International Monetary Fund policies favoring international debt repayment over social spending contributed to the Ebola crisis by hampering health care in the three worst-hit West African countries. 

In the Face of Stress, Flies Unite

December 26, 2014 9:29 am | by Ecole Polytechnique Federale De Lausanne | News | Comments

Fruit flies respond more effectively to danger when in a group.                                 

Meet The Newest Surgeon General

December 22, 2014 10:15 am | by Ryan Bushey, Associate Editor | Articles | Comments

President Obama's pick for the position turned out to be controversial.                                

3 Win Chemistry Nobel for Super-zoom Microscopes

October 8, 2014 10:36 am | by Karl Ritter and Malin Rising – Associated Press – Associated Press | News | Comments

Two Americans and a German scientist won the Nobel Prize in chemistry Wednesday for finding ways to make microscopes more powerful than previously thought possible, allowing scientists to see how diseases develop inside the tiniest cells.   

How Well Do You Know Nobel Prizes?

October 5, 2014 4:36 am | by Karl Ritter - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

Nobel season is upon us. On Monday, the Nobel Prize judges began a series of daily announcements revealing this year's winners. To help avoid any embarrassing water-cooler faux pas, here's a true-or-false guide to the prizes.       

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