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The Lead

Tuberculosis Research Takes Off

March 25, 2015 10:53 am | by Max Planck Institute | News | Comments

Scientists call for a global strategy for the development of new tuberculosis vaccines.

British DNA Gives Window into Ancient Past

March 19, 2015 3:38 pm | by Malcolm Ritter, AP Science Writer | News | Comments

Genetic samples collected from across the United Kingdom are shedding light on the ancient past...

Scientists Grow 'Mini-Lungs' to Aid the Study of Cystic Fibrosis

March 19, 2015 10:40 am | by University of Cambridge | News | Comments

Scientists at the University of Cambridge have successfully created ‘mini-lungs’ using stem...

Obese Women 40 percent More Likely to Get Cancer

March 18, 2015 12:00 pm | by Cancer Research UK | News | Comments

Obese women have around a 40 percent greater risk of developing a weight-related cancer in their...

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Researchers Report New Gene Associated With Thyroid Levels

March 9, 2015 10:01 am | by University of Bristol | News | Comments

Thyroid hormones have important and diverse roles in human health and regulate metabolic rate. Thyroid disease is common (affecting 5-10 per cent of the population) and synthetic thyroid hormones are one of the commonest drug therapies prescribed worldwide.

Million Man Study Examines Long-term Effects of Blocking Inflammation

February 27, 2015 10:07 am | by University of Cambridge | News | Comments

Inflammation - the body's response to damaging stimuli - may have a protective effect against cardiovascular disease, according to a study published in the journal Lancet Diabetes and Endocrinology.          

UK First Country to Allow Creation of Embryos from Three People

February 25, 2015 10:21 am | by Maria Cheng, AP Medical Writer | News | Comments

The bill granting the controversial techniques was passed Tuesday by the House of Lords, after being approved earlier this month by the House of Commons.                  

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Scientists Report Bionic Hand Resconstruction in Three Austrian Men

February 25, 2015 9:20 am | by Maria Cheng, AP Medical Writer | News | Comments

Three Austrians have replaced injured hands with bionic ones that they can control using nerves and muscles transplanted into their arms from their legs.                              

Cancer Risk Linked to DNA 'Wormholes'

February 19, 2015 11:59 am | by Institute of Cancer Research | News | Comments

Single-letter genetic variations within parts of the genome once dismissed as ‘junk DNA’ can increase cancer risk through 'wormhole-like' effects on far-off genes, new research shows.             

Disruption in Brain Signals Shed New Light on Melancholic Depression

February 19, 2015 11:54 am | by University of New South Wales | News | Comments

Researchers have identified a distinctive brain signature in people with melancholic depression, supporting calls for its classification as a unique mood disorder type.               

Protein Clue to Sudden Cardiac Death

February 17, 2015 3:56 pm | by Oxford University | News | Comments

A protein has been shown to have a surprising role in regulating the 'glue' that holds heart cells together, a finding that may explain how a gene defect could cause sudden cardiac death.            

Impact of Obesity on Fertility Can be Reversed

February 10, 2015 8:56 am | by University of Adelaide | News | Comments

Researchers have revealed how damage from obesity is passed from a mother to her children, and also how that damage can be reversed.                      

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Hydrogen Sulfide Could Help Lower Blood Pressure

January 29, 2015 3:00 pm | by University of Exeter | News | Comments

Research has indicated that a new compound, called AP39, which generates minute quantities of the gas hydrogen sulfide inside cells.                      

New Information on Relatively Unknown Blood Borne Bacteria

January 20, 2015 3:39 pm | by University of Bristol | News | Comments

Haemoplasmas are a group of blood borne bacteria found in a wide range of mammals, including domestic and wild cats, and can cause severe anaemia. The findings of a new study have significantly advanced researchers’ knowledge of immunity for these pathogens.

Ebola Patient in Britain Transferred to London

December 30, 2014 3:52 pm | by Associated Press | News | Comments

A British health care worker who contracted the Ebola virus in West Africa has been transferred from Scotland to an isolation unit in London for specialist treatment.                          

Researchers: IMF Policies Hindered Ebola Response

December 30, 2014 3:47 pm | by Michelle Faul - Associated Press | News | Comments

Professors from three leading British universities say International Monetary Fund policies favoring international debt repayment over social spending contributed to the Ebola crisis by hampering health care in the three worst-hit West African countries. 

In the Face of Stress, Flies Unite

December 26, 2014 9:29 am | by Ecole Polytechnique Federale De Lausanne | News | Comments

Fruit flies respond more effectively to danger when in a group.                                 

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Meet The Newest Surgeon General

December 22, 2014 10:15 am | by Ryan Bushey, Associate Editor | Articles | Comments

President Obama's pick for the position turned out to be controversial.                                

3 Win Chemistry Nobel for Super-zoom Microscopes

October 8, 2014 10:36 am | by Karl Ritter and Malin Rising – Associated Press – Associated Press | News | Comments

Two Americans and a German scientist won the Nobel Prize in chemistry Wednesday for finding ways to make microscopes more powerful than previously thought possible, allowing scientists to see how diseases develop inside the tiniest cells.   

How Well Do You Know Nobel Prizes?

October 5, 2014 4:36 am | by Karl Ritter - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

Nobel season is upon us. On Monday, the Nobel Prize judges began a series of daily announcements revealing this year's winners. To help avoid any embarrassing water-cooler faux pas, here's a true-or-false guide to the prizes.       

Smart Bacteria Help Each Other Survive

August 5, 2014 1:47 pm | News | Comments

The body’s assailants are cleverer than previously thought. New research from Lund University in Sweden shows for the first time how bacteria in the airways can help each other replenish vital iron. The bacteria thereby increase their chances of survival, which can happen at the expense of the person’s health.

Clues to the Aging of Tendons Unlocked

August 5, 2014 1:33 pm | News | Comments

University of Liverpool scientists have examined the mechanisms that cause ageing in the tendons of horses, opening up the possibility of better treatment for humans. It has been understood for many years that tendons are highly prone to injury and that this likelihood increases as they age.  Why this happens, is currently poorly understood.

Is Europe Putting Cancer Research at Risk?

July 25, 2014 1:53 pm | News | Comments

The European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO) has expressed concern that the proposed EU General Data Protection Regulation could make cancer research impossible and add a significant burden to both doctors and cancer patients.         

A-maize-ing Double Life of a Genome

July 15, 2014 12:06 pm | News | Comments

Early maize farmers selected for genes that improved the harvesting of sunlight, a new detailed study of how plants use 'doubles' of their genomes reveals. The findings could help current efforts to improve existing crop varieties. Oxford University researchers captured a 'genetic snapshot' of maize as it existed 10 million years ago when the plant made a double of its genome—a 'whole genome duplication' event.

Cancer Risk: Aspirin and Smoking Affect Aging of Genes

July 1, 2014 11:23 am | News | Comments

The risk of developing cancer increases with age. Factors like smoking and regular aspirin use also affect the risk of cancer—although in the opposite sense. Researchers from the University of Basel were now able to show that aspirin use and smoking both influence aging processes of the female genome that are connected to colorectal cancer.

Scientists Break the Genetic Code for Diabetes in Greenland

June 19, 2014 3:35 pm | Videos | Comments

A piece of detective work has mapped a special gene variant among Greenlanders that plays a particularly important role in the development of type 2 diabetes. The results can be used to improve prevention and treatment options for those genetically at-risk.

One Chip, One Dream: The Pursuit of a DNA-powered Lab-on-a-chip

June 4, 2014 1:38 pm | by Christina Jakubowski, Managing Editor | Articles | Comments

Christofer Toumazou believes he can change the world with his “one chip, one bug – one chip, one drug,” slogan. Nominated for the European Patent Office’s 2014 European Inventor award, he holds a patent for the technology behind a microchip that can analyze DNA within 30 minutes and without a laboratory.

Making Your Brain Social

February 3, 2014 11:48 am | News | Comments

In many people with autism and other neurodevelopmental disorders, different parts of the brain don’t talk to each other very well. Scientists have now identified, for the first time, a way in which this decreased functional connectivity can come about.

Parkinson Gene: Nerve Growth Factor Halts Mitochondrial Degeneration

January 31, 2014 1:20 pm | News | Comments

Neurodegenerative diseases like Parkinson’s disease involve the death of thousands of neurons in the brain. Nerve growth factors produced by the body, such as GDNF, promote the survival of the neurons; however, clinical tests with GDNF have not yielded in any clear improvements.

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