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Millions of GMO Insects Could Be Released in Florida Keys

January 26, 2015 9:26 am | by Jennifer Kay - Associated Press | News | Comments

Millions of genetically modified mosquitoes could be released in the Florida Keys if British researchers win approval to use the bugs against two extremely painful viral diseases.              

Magnificent Blue Glow of Hong Kong Seas Also Disturbing

January 23, 2015 4:30 pm | by Seth Borenstein - AP Science Writer | News | Comments

Eerie fluorescent blue patches of water glimmering off Hong Kong's seashore are magnificent,...

Estrogen-Producing Neurons Influence Aggression in Both Sexes

January 22, 2015 4:00 pm | by Pete Farley, UCSF | News | Comments

A miniscule cluster of estrogen-producing nerve cells in the mouse brain exerts highly specific...

Test Results Pending on Dead Birds in Northern California

January 22, 2015 3:54 pm | by Associated Press | News | Comments

Nearly a week after a mysterious gray gunk surfaced on shorelines in the San Francisco Bay Area...

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Building on Biocontainment

January 22, 2015 10:56 am | by Harvard Univ. | News | Comments

The creation of genetically modified and entirely synthetic organisms continues to generate excitement as well as worry.                                                                   

New Govt Standards Target Pathogens in Poultry Products

January 22, 2015 10:41 am | by Mary Clare Jalonick, Associated Press | News | Comments

Standards proposed by the Agriculture Department aim to reduce rates of salmonella and campylobacter, another pathogen that can cause symptoms similar to salmonella, in chicken parts, ground chicken and ground turkey. The standards would be voluntary but designed to pressure companies to take steps to reduce contamination.

“Sugar-Coated” Pill Helps The Medicine Go Down

January 22, 2015 10:22 am | by Cambridge Univ. | News | Comments

Cambridge scientists have discovered a solution for controlling one of the world’s biggest environmental and ecological pests – the zebra mussel.                                                                         

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Mysterious Goo Blamed in San Francisco Bay Area Bird Deaths

January 20, 2015 3:44 pm | by Kristin J. Bender - Associated Press | News | Comments

The death of 100 birds in the San Francisco Bay Area has baffled wildlife officials who say the feathers of the birds were coated with a mysterious substance that looks and feels like rubber cement.           

Tumor-Causing Virus Widespread in Wild Turkey

January 20, 2015 10:33 am | by Mary Esch, Associated Press | News | Comments

Wildlife biologists tracking a tumor-causing virus first diagnosed in eastern wild turkeys five years ago have found the virus is far more widespread - but less deadly - than expected.                             

Questions, Answers About Sri Lanka Mystery Kidney Disease

January 20, 2015 9:38 am | by Margie Mason, AP Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

A mystery kidney disease is killing Sri Lankan farmers. The first cases surfaced some two decades ago in the country's North Central province, the main rice-producing area. Since then, the disease has killed up to an estimated 20,000 people on the Indian Ocean island nation.

Human Mode of Responding to HIV Vaccine Conserved from Monkeys

January 16, 2015 2:25 pm | by Duke Medicine | News | Comments

The antibody response from an HIV vaccine trial in Thailand was made possible by a genetic trait carried over in humans from an ancient ancestry with monkeys and apes.                

Measles Pops Up in Outbreak Linked to Disney Parks

January 16, 2015 1:57 pm | by Alicia Chang - AP Science Writer | News | Comments

The highly contagious respiratory illness was declared eliminated in the U.S. in 2000, but health officials have seen a surge of measles infections in the country in recent years.              

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Sampling Finds More Asian Carp DNA Near Lake Michigan

January 16, 2015 1:52 pm | by Associated Press | News | Comments

A federal report says genetic markers of Asian carp are still showing up in Chicago-area waterways.                           

Iron Overload Disease Causes Rapid Bacteria Growth

January 15, 2015 9:40 am | by UCLA | News | Comments

Every summer, the news reports on a bacterium called Vibrio vulnificus found in warm saltwater that causes people to get sick, or die, after they eat raw tainted shellfish or when an open wound comes in contact with seawater.                                      

California Unveils Strictest Rules on Pesticide

January 14, 2015 3:53 pm | by Scott Smith-Associated Press | News | Comments

The new regulations surpass standards required by U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.                             

Five Biotech Startups to Watch in 2015

January 13, 2015 5:02 pm | by Ryan Bushey, Associate Editor | Articles | Comments

These companies have an interesting year ahead of them.                                   

Ancient Fossils Reveal Risk of Parasitic Infections Due to Climate Change

January 13, 2015 4:00 pm | by University of Missouri | News | Comments

Biologists found indications of a greater risk of parasitic infection due to climate change in ancient mollusk fossils.                        

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New Information on Chemicals Insects Use to Communicate and Survive

January 13, 2015 3:34 pm | by UC Riverside | News | Comments

Most insects are covered with a thin layer of hydrocarbon molecules as a waterproofing barrier.                            

The Divergent Skull

January 7, 2015 4:38 pm | by Peter Reuell. Harvard Gazette | News | Comments

New study provides a detailed look at how frog and salamander skulls develop, and shows that the pattern for frogs is different than that of other vertebrates.                 

Trying for Test-Tube Baby? Risks to Mom Are Rare

January 7, 2015 4:01 pm | by Lindsey Tanner - AP Medical Writer | News | Comments

A new 12-year U.S. study shows the most frequent involve drugs used to stimulate ovaries, but it suggests problems are rarely fatal.                      

Genetic Clue Points to Most Vulnerable Children

January 7, 2015 9:32 am | by Duke University | News | Comments

Some children are more sensitive to their environments, for better and for worse. Now Duke University researchers have identified a gene variant that may serve as a marker for these children, who are among society’s most vulnerable.  

Pacific Coast Sea Bird Die-Off Puzzles Scientists

January 5, 2015 10:42 am | by Associated Press | News | Comments

Scientists are trying to figure out what's behind the deaths of seabirds that have been found by the hundreds along the Pacific Coast since October.                                                 

Lyme Disease Enhances Spread of Emerging Tick Infection

December 30, 2014 3:02 pm | by Michael Greenwood, Yale University | News | Comments

Mice that are already infected with the pathogen that causes Lyme disease appear to facilitate the spread of a lesser-known but emerging disease, babesiosis, into new areas.               

Culture Influences Incidence of Depression

December 24, 2014 9:45 am | News | Comments

Culture influences the link between emotion and depression, according to new research into depression in developing countries.                                                                   

Surrogate Sushi: Japan Biotech for Bluefin Tuna

November 20, 2014 2:57 am | by Elaine Kurtenbach - AP Business Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

Of all the overfished fish in the seas, luscious, fatty bluefin tuna are among the most threatened. Marine scientist Goro Yamazaki, who is known in this seaside community as "Young Mr. Fish," is working to ensure the species survives.     

How Adult Fly Testes Keep from Changing Into Ovaries

November 14, 2014 11:08 am | News | Comments

New research in flies shows how cells in adult reproductive organs maintain their sexual identity. The study also identified a mutation that can switch the cells’ sexual identity.                     

Insights on Hummingbird Travel, Life Span Revealed

November 10, 2014 10:57 am | by Keith Ridler - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

Hummingbirds are giving up some of their secrets. The perfecting of placing tiny numbered bands on their legs in the last decade has led researchers to discover hummingbirds can live longer than 10 years as opposed to the two or three once thought likely.

DNA Study Dates Eurasian Split from East Asians

November 6, 2014 9:55 pm | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

The human populations now predominant in Eurasia and East Asia probably split between 36,200 and 45,000 years ago, according to a study released Thursday.                           

Environmental Carcinogens Leave Distinctive Genetic Imprints in Tumors

November 5, 2014 10:45 am | News | Comments

Genetically engineering tumors in mice, a technique that has dominated cancer research for decades, may not replicate important features of cancers caused by exposure to environmental carcinogens, according to a new study.        

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