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Are Failing Bees a Warning Sign to Human Health?

August 20, 2014 12:14 pm | News | Comments

A researcher believes that the potential human health implications of bee colony collapse disorder extend beyond the drop in pollination to the impact on humans of long exposure to low-level poisons, like neonicotinoid pesticides.     

Did Lower Testosterone Help Civilize Humanity?

August 4, 2014 11:46 am | News | Comments

A study of 1,400 ancient and modern human skulls suggests that a reduction in testosterone...

Toledo Mayor Lifts Water Ban

August 4, 2014 10:22 am | by John Seewer - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

A water ban that had hundreds of thousands of people in Ohio and Michigan scrambling for...

Bioscience Technology This Week #4: Gold Nanoparticles Show Promise for Drug Delivery

July 30, 2014 2:02 pm | Videos | Comments

On this episode of Bioscience Technology This Week, Editor-in-Chief Rob Fee reports on gold...

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Deadly Melanoma Cases Jump 200%, Report Says

July 30, 2014 8:22 am | by Anne Flaherty - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

Stop sunbathing and using indoor tanning beds, the acting U.S. surgeon general warned in a report released Tuesday that cites an alarming 200 percent jump in deadly melanoma cases since 1973.                 

Cooler Bedroom Temperatures May Boost Metabolic Activity

July 28, 2014 11:17 am | News | Comments

A new study has found that turning the thermostat down a few notches at night may expand brown fat tissue mass and activity, which could lead to metabolic benefits such as more effective disposal of glucose.             

Managing Ecosystems via Genomics

July 18, 2014 2:11 pm | News | Comments

A cross-disciplinary team is calling for public discussion about a potential new way to solve longstanding global ecological problems by using an emerging technology called “gene drives.” The advance could potentially lead to powerful new ways of combating malaria and other insect-borne diseases.

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Climate Change May Bring More Kidney Stones

July 11, 2014 1:57 pm | Videos | Comments

As daily temperatures increase, so does the number of patients seeking treatment for kidney stones. In a study that may both reflect and foretell a warming planet’s impact on human health, a research team found a link between hot days and kidney stones in 60,000 patients in several U.S. cities with varying climates.

Vitamin D Ups Bowel Cancer Survival

July 9, 2014 4:31 pm | News | Comments

Bowel cancer patients with high levels of vitamin D in their blood are more likely to survive the disease, a new study shows. Patients with the highest levels of vitamin D have half the risk of dying compared with those with the lowest levels, the findings reveal.

Neandertal Trait Found in Ancient Skull Raises New Evolution Questions

July 8, 2014 12:02 pm | News | Comments

Re-examination of a circa 100,000-year-old archaic early human skull found 35 years ago in Northern China has revealed the surprising presence of an inner-ear formation long thought to occur only in Neandertals.           

Low Doses of Arsenic Cause Cancer in Mice

July 8, 2014 11:50 am | News | Comments

Mice exposed to low doses of arsenic in drinking water, similar to what some people might consume, developed lung cancer, researchers have found. Arsenic is present in the environment as a naturally occurring substance or due to contamination from human activity.

Genetically Driven Gut Feelings Help Female Flies Choose Mates

July 3, 2014 8:30 am | News | Comments

The elaborate courtship dance done by flies combines multiple motor skills with advanced sensory cues. Remarkably, this behavior is entirely innate. Now, researchers have determined that the Abdominal-B (Abd-B) gene is important for this complex behavior.

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Lead in Kids’ Blood Linked to Behavioral, Emotional Issues

July 2, 2014 9:17 am | News | Comments

Emotional and behavioral problems show up even with low exposure to lead, and as blood lead levels increase in children, so do the problems, according to new research.                       

Using DNA to Monitor Environments

June 27, 2014 12:52 pm | News | Comments

Environmental policy must respond to ever-changing conditions on the ground and in the water, but doing so requires a constant flow of information about the living world. Now, scientists propose employing emerging environmental DNA sampling techniques that could make assessing the biodiversity of marine ecosystems as easy as taking a water sample.

Insect Diet Helped Early Humans Build Bigger Brains

June 26, 2014 11:25 am | News | Comments

Figuring out how to survive on a lean-season diet of hard-to-reach ants, slugs and other bugs may have spurred the development of bigger brains and higher-level cognitive functions in the ancestors of humans and other primates, suggests new research.

How Keeping Cool Could Spur Metabolic Benefits

June 23, 2014 2:37 pm | News | Comments

A new study being presented at ICE/ENDO 2014, the joint meeting of the International Society of Endocrinology and the Endocrine Society in Chicago, demonstrates that ambient temperatures can influence the growth or loss of brown fat in people. Cool environments stimulate growth, warm environments loss.

Livestock Gut Microbes Contributing to Greenhouse Gas Emissions

June 18, 2014 11:51 am | News | Comments

Ruminant livestock are the single largest source of methane emissions, and in a country like New Zealand, where the sheep outnumber people 7 to 1, that’s a big deal. However, not all ruminants are equal when it comes to greenhouse gas emissions.  It turns out that the amount of methane produced varies substantially across individual animals of the same ruminant species.

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Female Hormones May Contribute to Male Obesity

June 13, 2014 12:45 pm | News | Comments

An imbalance of female sex hormones among men in Western nations may be contributing to high levels of male obesity, according to new research. The study suggest that obesity among Western men could be linked with exposure to substances containing the female sex hormone estrogen.

Newborns Exposed to Allergens May Have Lower Allergy, Asthma Risk

June 9, 2014 12:57 pm | News | Comments

Infants exposed to rodent and pet dander, roach allergens and a wide variety of household bacteria in the first year of life appear less likely to suffer from allergies, wheezing and asthma, according to a new study.          

Breaking News: Air Pollution Linked to Autism, Schizophrenia

June 5, 2014 3:00 pm | News | Comments

A new study shows how exposure to air pollution early in life produces harmful changes in the brains of mice, including an enlargement of part of the brain that is seen in humans who have autism and schizophrenia.           

Sperm Size, Shape Affected by Cannabis Use

June 5, 2014 11:53 am | News | Comments

Young men who use cannabis may be putting their fertility at risk by inadvertently affecting the size and shape of their sperm, according to recently published research.                        

Did Standing Up Change Our Brains?

May 27, 2014 2:50 pm | News | Comments

As humans, how, and why, do we think and act so differently from other species? A new study suggests that the big difference between humans and other species may lie in how we use our brains for routine tasks.            

Mixed Signals

May 27, 2014 1:42 pm | by Skip Derra | Articles | Comments

The intimate interaction between a plant and its environment has sent some puzzling cues to scientists trying to determine how, at the molecular level, a plant becomes infected by bacteria. At this level, researchers have found that plants sometimes beckon the bacteria in a seemingly counterintuitive action to its health.

Fossil-fuel-free Process Makes Biodiesel Sustainable

May 22, 2014 2:02 pm | News | Comments

A newly developed fuel-cell concept will allow biodiesel plants to eliminate the creation of hazardous wastes while removing their dependence on fossil fuel from their production process.                  

Martian Mineral Could be Linked to Microbes

May 20, 2014 1:53 pm | News | Comments

Scientists have discovered that the earliest living organisms on Earth were capable of making a mineral that may be found on Mars. The clay-mineral stevensite has been used since ancient times, but scientists had believed deposits could only be formed in harsh conditions. Researchers found living microbes create an environment that allows stevensite to form, raising new questions about the stevensite found on Mars.

Breaking News: Genes May Verify Earliest American Inhabitants

May 15, 2014 2:12 pm | News | Comments

A new study uses genetic information extracted from the remains of an adolescent girl to help resolve the longstanding debate about the origins of the first people to inhabit the Americas.                  

Hazardous Flame Retardants Found in Child Care Settings

May 15, 2014 11:17 am | News | Comments

A new study of preschools and day care centers finds that flame retardants are prevalent indoors, potentially exposing young children to chemicals known to be hazardous.                       

Teenage Concussions Linked to Higher Rates of Suicide Attempts

April 16, 2014 2:04 pm | News | Comments

Teenagers who have suffered a traumatic brain injury such as a concussion are at “significantly greater odds” of attempting suicide, being bullied and engaging in a variety of high risk behaviors, a new study has found.          

Cholesterol Levels Vary by Season, Worsen in Colder Months

March 27, 2014 12:15 pm | News | Comments

Cholesterol levels fluctuate based on the time of year with more unfavorable lipid profiles seen in the colder months, a trend that may be driven by related behavior changes, according to new research.               

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