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Trying for Test-Tube Baby? Risks to Mom Are Rare

January 7, 2015 4:01 pm | by Lindsey Tanner - AP Medical Writer | News | Comments

A new 12-year U.S. study shows the most frequent involve drugs used to stimulate ovaries, but it suggests problems are rarely fatal.                      

Genetic Clue Points to Most Vulnerable Children

January 7, 2015 9:32 am | by Duke University | News | Comments

Some children are more sensitive to their environments, for better and for worse. Now Duke University researchers have identified a gene variant that may serve as a marker for these children, who are among society’s most vulnerable.  

Pacific Coast Sea Bird Die-Off Puzzles Scientists

January 5, 2015 10:42 am | by Associated Press | News | Comments

Scientists are trying to figure out what's behind the deaths of seabirds that have been found by the hundreds along the Pacific Coast since October.                                                 

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Lyme Disease Enhances Spread of Emerging Tick Infection

December 30, 2014 3:02 pm | by Michael Greenwood, Yale University | News | Comments

Mice that are already infected with the pathogen that causes Lyme disease appear to facilitate the spread of a lesser-known but emerging disease, babesiosis, into new areas.               

Culture Influences Incidence of Depression

December 24, 2014 9:45 am | News | Comments

Culture influences the link between emotion and depression, according to new research into depression in developing countries.                                                                   

Surrogate Sushi: Japan Biotech for Bluefin Tuna

November 20, 2014 2:57 am | by Elaine Kurtenbach - AP Business Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

Of all the overfished fish in the seas, luscious, fatty bluefin tuna are among the most threatened. Marine scientist Goro Yamazaki, who is known in this seaside community as "Young Mr. Fish," is working to ensure the species survives.     

How Adult Fly Testes Keep from Changing Into Ovaries

November 14, 2014 11:08 am | News | Comments

New research in flies shows how cells in adult reproductive organs maintain their sexual identity. The study also identified a mutation that can switch the cells’ sexual identity.                     

Insights on Hummingbird Travel, Life Span Revealed

November 10, 2014 10:57 am | by Keith Ridler - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

Hummingbirds are giving up some of their secrets. The perfecting of placing tiny numbered bands on their legs in the last decade has led researchers to discover hummingbirds can live longer than 10 years as opposed to the two or three once thought likely.

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DNA Study Dates Eurasian Split from East Asians

November 6, 2014 9:55 pm | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

The human populations now predominant in Eurasia and East Asia probably split between 36,200 and 45,000 years ago, according to a study released Thursday.                           

Environmental Carcinogens Leave Distinctive Genetic Imprints in Tumors

November 5, 2014 10:45 am | News | Comments

Genetically engineering tumors in mice, a technique that has dominated cancer research for decades, may not replicate important features of cancers caused by exposure to environmental carcinogens, according to a new study.        

Childhood Autism Linked to Air Toxics

October 22, 2014 2:13 pm | News | Comments

Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) were more likely to have been exposed to higher levels of certain air toxics during their mothers’ pregnancies and the first two years of life compared to children without the condition, according to a new study.

New Approach to Boosting Biofuel Production

October 3, 2014 1:49 pm | News | Comments

Yeast are commonly used to transform corn and other plant materials into biofuels such as ethanol. However, large concentrations of ethanol can be toxic to yeast, which has limited the production capacity of many yeast strains used in industry. Now, researchers have identified a new way to boost yeast tolerance to ethanol by simply altering the composition of the medium in which the yeast are grown.

Study Examines Cancer Risk from First Atom-bomb Test

September 30, 2014 8:30 am | by Susan Montoya Bryan - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

Researchers from the National Cancer Institute want to know how many past and present cancer cases in New Mexico may be related to the U.S. government's test of the world's first atomic bomb over a remote stretch of desert nearly 70 years ago.  

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FDA Revises Food Safety Rules Due Next Year

September 19, 2014 5:35 pm | by Mary Clare Jalonick - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

The Food and Drug Administration on Friday revised sweeping food safety rules proposed last year after farmers complained that the regulations could hurt business.                         

Modern Europeans Descended from 3 Groups of Ancestors

September 18, 2014 1:56 pm | News | Comments

By comparing nine ancient genomes to those of modern humans, scientists have shown that previously unrecognized groups contributed to the genetic mix now present in most modern-day Europeans.                 

BST This Week #15: Bees May be Key to Antibiotic Alternatives

September 12, 2014 8:30 am | Videos | Comments

On this episode of Bioscience Technology This Week, Christina Jakubowski explores the role that bees may play in the search for antibiotic alternatives. Our second story focuses on how increased carbon dioxide levels in water can rob sharks of their ability to sense the smell of food.

Scientists Say the Ozone Layer is Recovering

September 11, 2014 8:37 am | by Seth Borenstein - AP Science Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

Earth's protective ozone layer is beginning to recover, largely because of the phase-out since the 1980s of certain chemicals used in refrigerants and aerosol cans, a U.N. scientific panel reported Wednesday.            

Single Cell Smashes, Rebuilds Its Own Genome

September 8, 2014 3:52 pm | News | Comments

Life can be so intricate and novel that even a single cell can pack a few surprises, according to a new study. The pond-dwelling, single-celled organism Oxytricha trifallax has the remarkable ability to break its own DNA into nearly a quarter-million pieces and rapidly reassemble those pieces when it's time to mate, the study says.

More Than 8 in 10 U.S. Homes Forbid Smoking

September 4, 2014 1:25 pm | by Mike Stobbe - AP Medical Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

Smoking is banned in more than eight out of 10 U.S. homes— nearly twice as many as two decades ago, according to a new government study. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found smoking is even forbidden in nearly half of homes where an adult smoker resides.

Making Bones from Beer Waste

August 28, 2014 8:30 am | by Skip Derra | Articles | Comments

At first blush it is a bit disingenuous, using beer waste as a base material for new bone. But that is exactly what a multidisciplinary team of researchers in Spain has come up with in a process for making the substrate material on which bone can be regenerated.

Fossil Provides Earliest Evidence of Animals with Muscles

August 28, 2014 8:30 am | News | Comments

An unusual new fossil discovery of one of the earliest animals on earth may also provide the oldest evidence of muscle tissue– the bundles of cells that make movement in animals possible.                  

Are Failing Bees a Warning Sign to Human Health?

August 20, 2014 12:14 pm | News | Comments

A researcher believes that the potential human health implications of bee colony collapse disorder extend beyond the drop in pollination to the impact on humans of long exposure to low-level poisons, like neonicotinoid pesticides.     

Did Lower Testosterone Help Civilize Humanity?

August 4, 2014 11:46 am | News | Comments

A study of 1,400 ancient and modern human skulls suggests that a reduction in testosterone hormone levels accompanied the development of cooperation, complex communication and modern culture some 50,000 years ago.           

Toledo Mayor Lifts Water Ban

August 4, 2014 10:22 am | by John Seewer - Associated Press - Associated Press | News | Comments

A water ban that had hundreds of thousands of people in Ohio and Michigan scrambling for drinking water has been lifted, Toledo's mayor announced Monday.                           

Bioscience Technology This Week #4: Gold Nanoparticles Show Promise for Drug Delivery

July 30, 2014 2:02 pm | Videos | Comments

On this episode of Bioscience Technology This Week, Editor-in-Chief Rob Fee reports on gold nanoparticles' promise in drug delivery. Our second story examines the work being done to decipher the wheat genome and the implications of this work.

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